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Harriete Estel Berman
San Mateo, California
Harriete Estel Berman creates jewelry, sculpture, Judaica & installations from recycled materials [http://www.harriete-estel-berman.info] and author of the Professional Guidelines[http://www.harriete-estel-berman.info/profguidelines/profguide.html]
Interests: Professional Guidelines, Professional Development Seminar, ASK Harriete, recycled materials, thinking and acting green, environmental issues, composting, Sociology, marketing, 2.0 marketing,
Recent Activity
Thank you for your comments and requests, however do not leave comments with links to your website. The links will be removed if I perceive that your comment is spam rather than genuine. Harriete
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In the informative video, "Visual Acoustics", the architectural photography of Julius Shulman is given a context within the history of mid-20th century modernism architecture.The photographs of Shulman became the "signature images of California architecture." Continue reading
Posted Sep 23, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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Mid-century modernism is one of my design interests that only seems to intensify with more visibility of shows like this one at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco -"Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism". Nothing compares to seeing the actual objects, furniture, and graphics in person, all collected at one location for hours of study. And it seems that as this time period of mid 20th century grows more popular, more objects surface that I haven't seen before. Continue reading
Posted Sep 22, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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I recently discovered this video about art collecting and thought it was worth recommending. The movie is about the father of actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus who has donated his art collection to fund art education. As a collector he purchased work that was not "market driven", but art work that he loved. Continue reading
Posted Sep 15, 2014 at Ask Harriete
Thanks for your comment and sharing your experience. It is good to hear that "most sites comply within days, even hours" as I am struggling with getting my images removed from a pornography site. A shocking and disgusting experience. It appears they even moved their site to a new host rather than take down the images. I continue to pursue the issue and am very glad that I wrote this post, because I have used it as my guide for a DMCA take down. Harriete
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Thank you Cindy for leaving a comment. You are right, some of the enthusiasts are probably ignorant or uninformed about these issues. While this is no excuse, it just shows that it becomes the responsibility of everyone teaching workshops, or lessons to discuss ethical and legal boundaries surrounding copyright. Harriete
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Typepad HTML Email Thanks Alyson, I will add that to the post. Harriete
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Change an error into an opportunity.Beyond a great user experience what information should your 404 page include? Here are the six items that make a 404 error page a success along with some great examples of 404 error pages. Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2014 at Ask Harriete
CS brings forward Pinterest as an example. As I see it, Pinterest has both pros and cons, but it is not inherently "bad or ugly" in itself. It is "BAD and UGLY" use of the site that it is objectionable. Pinning an image without attribution, and link to the original source is really UGLY. Pinning from an artist's website without their permission is also objectionable. Re-Pinning an image that has no citation to the artist or maker is equally objectionable. Do not circulate previous BAD and UGLY practices. Pinning with the purpose to copy, duplicate the image, idea, content, or object is the "UGLY" of the UGLY. On the other hand, Pinterest is a great way to engage a new audience with art or craft. Can we inform this new audience about ethical or legal boundaries surrounding copyright? I hope so.
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Museums are well aware that ownership of an artwork or craft object does not automatically include ownership of the copyright to the image of the artwork. This is why museums and knowledgeable collectors typically ask the artist to agree to a contract for Non-Exclusive Copyright License. Continue reading
Posted Aug 25, 2014 at Ask Harriete
Thanks Cindy for your comments. Yes, when customers post images of their purchases, this becomes an endorsement and publicity for your work, so it is good momentum. On the other hand, the images are probably not so great shot with their phone camera, and without professional lighting, composition, or an attractive, no clutter background. What can you do? Not much, the good part is that the images are not good enough quality to facilitate copies. This topic takes us right to my next post. The topic will be working with museums and collectors using a non-exclusive license for photographic images. Stay tuned for more explanation. Harriete
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Early in the transaction is where information and advocacy can make all the difference. Make sure that your contracts, commission contract or transaction are clear that purchase of work does not include the copyright or unauthorized copies. Continue reading
Posted Aug 18, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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This window display would translate perfectly to a craft show display. Continue reading
Posted Aug 6, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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Does your website loose customers, clients or viewers if they discover a broken link or bad URL? What impact does this have on your website? How does this affect your web presence? This post begins the series on 404 errors, SEO and more. Continue reading
Posted Aug 4, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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The 404 Error Page is an opportunity to entertain and delight your website viewer with wit and insight. Here are examples of great 404 pages including the best museums use of art from 1872 Randolph Rogers, "The Lost Pleiad" to Edward Ruscha oil painting "OOF" from 1962. Think about how you can use your artwork for a great 404 page. Continue reading
Posted Aug 3, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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A lesson for everyone to try unexpected solutions for their art or craft. This risk started a whole new line of work for me that continues to this day. The ordinary tin boxes carry memories of ritual, and observation from another generation. It is odd that the boxes have no valuable, but they are too valuable to be thrown away. Continue reading
Posted Jul 24, 2014 at Ask Harriete
Terry, I appreciate that you took time to leave a comment on ASK Harriete. In regards to your cost of good sold...it is important to calculate your cost of materials for your Cost of Goods Sold. At the same time I understand that figuring out the cost of each piece of glass would be tedious and/or hard to manage. Perhaps you could figure out the average cost of your glass by the square foot. The double or triple the cost to account for waste when measuring the finished item. Perhaps you could calculate a surcharge when you use some very expensive special glass. Another way of going about it…might be to write the cost of the glass (per square foot)right on the glass when you buy it. AS you plan the project….and then cut the glass you put down price per square foot and how many square feet you used including waste. This goes on a tally sheet for that project. It’s a guestimate….but both methods would give you a fairly accurate Cost of Goods. The final issue is that you also have the problem of inventory of unused glass that you need to carry over into the next year. Harriete
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If your website SEO isn't working, your website isn't working for you. AND there are lots of issues that can affect your ranking in search results, but I have found a great SEO tool that is free with unlimited use. Continue reading
Posted Jul 21, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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During my tour behind the scenes in the storage area of The Magnes, Curator, Dr. Francesco Sagnolo, opened a drawer containing Tzedakah boxes. How did he know that these small tin boxes would be my favorite objects of the day. Did he know that these small tin boxes changed the direction of my work in 1997? Continue reading
Posted Jul 16, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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Saving and collecting objects representing former times can become extraordinary if they have survived to share their history. That is what The Magnes Collection is all about. This is also how your work can become part of a museum collection, but only if you understand the value of your work now and for the future. Continue reading
Posted Jul 15, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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Recently, I had the opportunity to see behind the scenes at the Magnes Collection with my daughter. The staff allowed us to see drawer after drawer of this extensive Judaica Collection. One practice that I observed right away was that all objects, whether ordinary to extraordinary, are stored and cared for with superb diligence. Continue reading
Posted Jul 9, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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The topic of how museum collections are stored has always fascinated me. What do the museum professionals do with artwork and artifacts during the indefinite periods of time until the next exhibition? How do museum's protect their collections for the long term? This post with special guide, Dr. Daniel Viragh, Post Doctoral Fellow at The Magnes, and Curator, Dr. Francesco Sagnolo will share some insight into museum storage. Continue reading
Posted Jul 7, 2014 at Ask Harriete
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Pick one page, just one page, and fix it up. Do Your Own SEO Test. Craft a better web page with these 10 tips for Artists and Makers to attract web traffic to your website. Continue reading
Posted Jul 1, 2014 at Ask Harriete
Anon, I don't believe all work is derivative, and consider this discussion important to bring forward for consideration so we are all more careful about respecting intellectual property. And, unfortunately, there is plenty of evidence that people do not think about the consequences of their actions. That makes this post, the comments and discussion all the more important. Thank you for sharing your point of view on the matter. Harriete
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Google considers "comments" from other people on your blog the same as your content. With this insight, as the publisher of your blog, you should edit comments for grammar at a minimum, correct punctuation or spelling, remove all links that are unrelated to the post content, and actually delete comments that do not add content to your post. Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2014 at Ask Harriete