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marc farley
San Jose, CA
Recent Activity
Only the marketing museum that is IBM would have waited this long to turn the lights out on Lotus. I'm not sure people really feel nostalgic about Notes, but they might miss the 123 days when they could run circles around their co-workers who didn't have a 286 system with 3.5" floppies. I joined this industry about 12 months too late to be one of them so I didn't have to drink this one off. Poor me. :(
Toggle Commented Nov 22, 2012 on Lotus: Killed by death. at Storagezilla
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My cat always thinks that scratching the furniture will make me like him. Unfortunately, that is not usually the case because his scratching drives me nuts most of the time. Then there is the problem that I sometimes engage him in human-cat interaction by dragging a string toy over the... Continue reading
Posted Jan 29, 2012 at testblog
Predictions of demise and failure of competitors like Netapp and 3PAR were not so accurate.
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2011 on HP Throws Down Its Cloud Hand at Chuck's Blog
Chuck, of course it's FUD unless you have a working crystal ball.
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2011 on HP Throws Down Its Cloud Hand at Chuck's Blog
Marc Farley from HP here. The following is my own opinion. There is no question that there will be competition in the markets for cloud services. There will be a lot of services, a lot of service providers and a lot of ways for companies like HP to establish partnerships with lots of cloud service providers. One of the main reasons for HP's successes over the years is the company's ability to share it's opportunities with its business partners all around the world. This next major stage in the evolution of information technology will create many, many partnership opportunities, something that plays very well to HP's strengths.
Toggle Commented Mar 15, 2011 on HP Throws Down Its Cloud Hand at Chuck's Blog
Hi Chuck, Nice piece that summarizes the changing market dynamics pretty well. But I'm less convinced that we are looking at a linear trend, but much more of a cycle. I can't speak for Sun, but HP is investing heavily in storage again and there is recent precedent to believe we (I work for HP now) can be very successful in storage. After all, who would have predicted thought that our networking products would have rebounded so well and would be gaining share so fast? But if EMC wants to believe we are fading away, that's fine with us.
Joseph, Thanks for the IBM link - yes I see they are still working on autonomic computing at their Almaden Research Center. This includes autonomic storage management. However, this is not nearly the same thing as actively marketing a real product that features autonomic processing. My Google search of "autonomic storage" shows a whole lot of 3PAR results and not much of anybody else. I guess I live in a storage-stilted world. Thomas, the email address you left with your comment was a gmail address. That's OK, but it leaves the question as to whether or not you work for a vendor or have some other vested interest in this industry. This blog is not a forum to discuss HP's product roadmaps, especially with commenters that are not transparent. dlove, the industry has matured and gone through an enormous consolidation, which means the barriers to entry for startups are much higher. Not that there won't be new small companies coming along, but not nearly at the same rate as there used to be. Unfortunately, I believe that is the way it is going to be for some time. Storagebod, thanks for the clarification on the broken records, I should have known from reading your blog a couple weeks ago. As for me, I wanted to see the EMC social team pile into the mini - maybe with Zilla's smiling mug pressed against the window screaming something about Chuck invading his personal space?
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Yes Chuck, I enjoyed it like I enjoyed the original Death Race 2000. Joseph, of course we did not invent the word autonomic, we borrowed it. However, we have been actively using it in our marketing and messaging continually for the past several years - unlike HP, IBM and anybody else I know of. The fact that EMC competes with us every day and is exposed to our messaging - because customers use the language vendors use with other vendors - is the reason I can say with certainty that EMC is borrowing our winning messages and using it to position their own products more effectively. It's a "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em" scenario. EMC is a smart company and they use all the resources available - including those that come from their competitors. It's smart of them to do it.
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Well, I did start working for HP recently. A change of perspective was inevitable! Of course, the fact that HP now owns the 3PAR technology makes a big difference in their overall storage portfolio. That said, I'm starting to see the larger picture of what is happening here under Dave Donatelli and David Scott's leadership and I'm liking it. There is a lot of focus on certain key products. Where NAS is concerned, the strategic technology platform for HP is the x9000 (Ibrix based scale out NAS). I'd agree with you Steve about Polyserve's technology being targeted at a specific market - SQL Server - but that isn't the case with Ibrix. (FWIW, Steve is an old friend of mine in the business who works for BlueArc these days) And CASA? Really? That is such old news. Lefthand? Not really NAS, is it. I mean, you can always front end block with file, but it doesn't necessarily mean that it is a strategic NAS play. I think there is a big difference in HP's single technology NAS strategy based on the x9000 platform and EMC's dual technology NAS strategy with both Celerra + Isilon. Converged Infrastructure is the primary strategic direction for HP's systems, storage and networking products. The strategic NAS solution for converged Infrastructure is the x9000 platform.
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Thanks, I hope you had an excellent Thanksgiving.
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Hi Martin, For a guy who likes to give Netapp such grief, it seems you have borrowed a page from their "Dummies Guide to HP Storage" pamphlet in this post! EVA will co-exist with 3PAR in HP's product line for several years for two big reasons: 1) There are a lot of EVA customers that have been promised an updated EVA. 2) HP has put a lot of effort into fulfilling that promise. Does it mean that HP will produce EVA systems forever? (No) Does it mean HP won't have upgrade paths from EVA to 3PAR? (of course they will) There is no rush for EVA customers to panic about their storage futures. HP intends to give them plenty of time to plot their own storage strategies. Let's change the perspective on this just a little. Should HP force their loyal EVA customers to make a change just because the company has a new storage strategy? That wouldn't be very nice! But what about new customers that don't have any HP storage? It turns out there are a lot of THOSE in the world. The acquisition of 3PAR was not done to grow HP's storage business organically through its EVA install base, but to take market share away from HP's competitors. Of course, the competitors are all very much aware of that and so they would rather frame the 3PAR acquisition as an EVA versus 3PAR sort of thing. Rest assured, this is not a soap opera starring EVA and 3PAR - its a campaign to get as many people as possible on HP storage. So - in that vein Martin - here's a question for you: what is your opinion of HP's X9000 scale out NAS storage platform? As a newbie to HP storage, I'm impressed with what I've seen so far, but - you know - I also have the paycheck bias.
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2010 on Has HP Got the 'X Factor'? at Storagebod's Blog
Glad you liked it.
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Thanks Devang!
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Chuck, this post got top reviews in Twitter from @SteveDupe and @Valb00. I concur. Nice piece of writing here.
Toggle Commented Oct 22, 2010 on That's (Information) Logistics at Chuck's Blog
OK, here's the scoop: The X9000 is all Ibrix technology - none from Polyserve. The appliance products (9320 + 9720) with integrated disk drives are not supported as gateway systems. However both gateway systems and appliances can be mixed within a cluster under a single name space up to 16 PB in size and you can tier across those different systems. Hope that helps.
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The ESG report talks about the X9300 as an Ibrix gateway and I trust them to get it right. I don't know about the mix and match capabilities of the various models. I'll try to find out.
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JR is a pretty relaxed guy and tends to be thoughtful and not inclined to rush. But if you didn't notice, maybe the scrunchifying technique should be used more often to "condense the experience"?
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Comfortably numb?
Toggle Commented Sep 28, 2010 on It's all fine.... at Storagebod's Blog
Thanks everybody for your comments and encouragement. Here's to ever more opportunities to delight customers!
Toggle Commented Sep 28, 2010 on 3PAR is sucked into HP at StorageRap
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EqualLogic arrays support many more types of drives than XIV - heck I think all other arrays do.
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Hi Nate, It's probably a good thing that there is no single entity in charge of maintaining the system of our planet. Imagine how screwed up that could get! We have a problem because we lack the data and tools to understand the system's health. As much as some attempt to read the tea leaves, there are others who call "bull" on their efforts. The way I see it, the cost of not making adjustments could be much greater than the cost of making the adjustments. It's obvious that we are depleting a lot of energy resources that aren't being replenished and the by-products of those resource expenditures are being redistributed irretrievably, with some probability that they are adjusting system variables. FWIW, I'm not sure that sustainable necessarily requires organic production. Organic production seems like it is more likely to be sustainable, but there are many ways to get do things. It seems to me that local production without the hidden costs of transportation are a larger issue than organic. Anyway, I think its worth working on and trying to play whatever part I can. That's what the blog post was about, as well as changes I'm trying to make as a consumer. BTW, are you coming to the bay area any time soon? Input required for #storagebeers planning.
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Hey now! It might be time to schedule that #storagebeers! Moving this thread to Twitter.
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Dimitris, your comment is a slight misrepresentation of Netapp's business. There is a DR service at Terremark that uses Netapp storage. Customers like Terremark defintiely need second sources. I think there would be quite a scrum among all vendors over the title of "largest provider for the cloud". Beyond Cisco's stake in networking equipment, all such claims are up for grabs, subject to market and customer definitions for the cloud. As to acquisition opportunities for Netapp, who knows? It doesn't seem like any company can be counted out these days.
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Good post Chuck. There is no doubt that the industry is changing and this move by Dell clearly demonstrates that. Overall it means there will be fewer competitors figuring out how to partner and compete. Those that walk that fine line the best are likely to have the most success. Dell's position is to be open and to try to work with everybody (although the HP/Dell rivalry is bitter at times) and I believe they will figure it out, just as they did following the EqualLogic acquisition.
Toggle Commented Aug 16, 2010 on My Take -- Dell To Acquire 3PAR at Chuck's Blog