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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Shannon, friends the other night were talking about Boyhood and saying it was wonderful.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on What We're Watching in September at Word Wenches
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Ute, I've promised myself this series as soon as I've finished my current book. I loved Cross stitch and the first four or five of the series. Lost interest when they went to America, I confess. But I adored Jamie as a hero.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on What We're Watching in September at Word Wenches
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Oh, Kanch, I'm sorry we pinched your Darcy statue. It's a bit of fun, and fitted in with the theme and the setting here beautifully. But it's MUCH larger than I expected. It was a fun scene in that version of P&P, though I'm betting it's something a real Darcy would never have done -- and in fact I think I remember reading somewhere that Colin Firth didn't do it either, but had a stand in swim through the murky water and the weeds. But frivolous being that I am, I didn't mind the wet-short view at all. ;)
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Thanks, Andrea. I think the Darcy pool toy would be more attractive if it wasn't quite so large and staring. And yes, the dresses are gorgeous.
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"She said they used straight brass pins to hold it. I laughed and said I had never heard of a hero and heroine sea rching for pins to put a lady back together in a romance novel." Ah, but it does explain all those Georgette Heyer heroines who were able to produce a pin on the spot with which to defend themselves against some villain, doesn't it? Thanks, Shannon. Now I want more than ever to go there. I want to Plimoth Village (or whatever it's called) some 20 years ago and enjoyed that experience. It was relatively new at that stage. I'm sure it's developed a lot since.
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Thanks, Glenda. We're lucky to be able to share some places and sights on the internet, aren't we?
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Janga _ a belated comment on Johnny Horton's battle of new orleans. I was at a party last night where there were half a dozen fiddle players (and guitar and drums and whoever instruments were to hand — not an organized performance), playing traditional Irish tunes, and in one song I found myself humming "They ran through the biriars" etc — and then said, "Hey, this is a lot like The battle of new orleans. And a bunch of us started singing it (and trying to remember all the words of the verses), and it wasn't the whole song, but parts of it were spot on the same. And of course, that's the nature of folk music, isn't it? It spreads and is adapted and becomes something new. But I was thinking of this converation last night.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on O, say can you see…? at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary Jo, yes, I could just imagine my hero and heroine dancing out onto the terrace. Or slipping into the fernery. The house is not all that big, actually, not as big as many I've seen in the UK or USA but it's lovely, and the grounds are beautiful. It''s that's that's such a treat, really -- here it is, this large gracious estate, right in the middle of suburbia.
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Fab, Lil -- I will dig out whatever details I can find. The description of the dress in the catalogue lists one of the materials as nacre, so I'm guessing those pearls are real. Pretty amazing if they are.
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Sonya, yes it's an awful long way to get from Australia to most places in Europe. But we go, don't we? My two oldest friends are there right now, one in the UK, after a long leisurely trip through Italy, and the other is in Spain -- well, actually she just went to Paris for her birthday. Sigh. I have Spain envy. And Italy envy. And UK envy. And the south of France envy — and if you're going to be anywhere near Provence, make sure you read my contribution to our end of month "What we're Looking At." I have itchy feet.
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Shannon, that sounds wonderful. Williamsburg is a part of the US I do want to see — they have some wonderful historical sites, don't they? And a costume museum? Am I thinking of the right place? But yes, the UK and Europe is where I long for most. History and gorgeousness wherever you turn.
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It is amazing, isn't it, Angelina? We're lucky to be able to do it all so quickly, even though we moan about sitting on a plane for more than 20 hours. Better than a ship for six months, as they did in the days of sail, or a month as it took on modern cruise ships.
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Lucy I imagine Mr Darcy would be appalled at all the attention, not to mention the statue. I imagine Colin Firth doesn't much like it either. Such is the price of fame. Re the dress in the first photo, it's beautiful isn't it? It was my favorite. I'm not sure how much more I can tell you about it, but I'll include it and whatever details I can find in my next post. The one complaint I had about the exhibition was that the signs that gave all the information about each dress were dark red, and printed in small white print on a dark red background, and were posted behind the 'do not step across' borders, at least a metre (3-4 feet) away, and for the most part I couldn't read them to take notes. I had to use my camera and hope I could read them on my computer later. But I'll do my best.
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Lil, it's amazing. As well as all the pearls sewn on it, there are dozens of clusters that dangle from the dress as well. I'm sure it was amazing to watch in motion—they'd all swing and shimmer. I have a close-up of a section of the pearl embroidery, but there was no space to put it up on this blog. I'll pop it on my FB page so you can see it better. I'm curious as to what you'll use it for. A design? A story? What?
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Thanks, Fi — I think you'll love it. Next time you come to Melbourne, maybe -- though the wedding dress exhibition finishes early November. But the gardens and the house are lovely to visit anyway. Hope you like the Jane ballroom scene when it comes out. I did have fun with it.
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Anne here, talking about taking inspiration where you can find it. I have often envied Wench Nicola (and now Wench Jo since she's moved back to England) for their ability to pop in to various stately homes and use them for the settings of their stories. I can't do that. I'm a 26 hour plane ride from the UK, and a few thousand dollars, so I have to find my settings on line, and from memory, mostly. But sometimes, a setting can inspire, even though historically it's not authentic. In the last couple of months I've conducted a few writing... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Word Wenches
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" I hear bonk as in hitting but I don't remember when I last heard boink (or bonk, for that matter) for sex. They use the F word now." No, but that's what I'm saying. I think "bonk" in the sexual sense is commonly used and understood in the UK and Australia, though probably not in the USA. I'd never heard or seen "boink" until Mary Jo used it.
Toggle Commented Sep 14, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Marianne Nice that some of the books are available in e-form. It would be lovely if someone tracked down Maggie Osborne (or her publishers) and encouraged them to get them all put up in e.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Wonderful post, Susan. One of my most beloved books as a child — and I still have it — is a big old book called Fairy Tales from Other Lands, and it contains fairy tales from a wide range of cultures. One of my favorite illustrators of fairy tales is Arthur Rackham.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2014 on On Fairy Tales at Word Wenches
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Thanks for this, Vicki. I'll keep an eye out for Elswyth Thane's Williamsburg series
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Kanch, that's very true. Tastes and attitudes change as you mature. I think I did try one Judith McNaught book, but I can't remember which one it was, and it mustn't have caught my fancy because I don't have any of her books on my shelves (and I have a lot of shelves.) Usually when I glom an author I buy and keep the books, because I like to reread. For me, favorite books are like old friends. There are a few authors from the 90's that I glommed when I first discovered US romance novels (and learned the word 'glommed') and I'm planning to reread some of them. We'll see how they look to me now.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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That's a great scene, isn't it, Constance? I do like that movie. Thank you for the Elswyth Thayne recommendation — what a lovely old-fashioned name that is. I haven't heard of her, but I'll certainly look her up.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Janice, I just googled boinking, to see where it's used and this came up: I do think it's one of those tomahto/tomayto things. bonk/bɒŋk/ verb hit (someone or something). have sexual intercourse. (of a cyclist or runner) reach a point of exhaustion that makes it impossible to go further.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Must be another aussie/US thing -- we say bonking meaning sex (not boinking) and we also use it for bonking someone over the head.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Sorry, Shannon -- "bonking" is a term that's quite commonly understood in the UK and Australia, so I assumed it would be familiar to North Americans, too. But we also say "She bonked him over the head," making the context clear. So, what should I say that's not rude? *g*
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2014 on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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