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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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I'm so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We're Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they're not all funny.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Seasonal Reads and Viewings at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we're so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you've enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Seasonal Reads and Viewings at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Jana -- so glad you enjoyed Daisy's story. And I'm so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven't read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up. As for rereads, I'm giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship ;)
Toggle Commented yesterday on Seasonal Reads and Viewings at Word Wenches
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Annette, I also have Pat's book on my e-reader, though haven't read it yet. BTW she's in the air, flying at the moment, so she can't respond to any of these comments. But I'm sure she appreciates them.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Seasonal Reads and Viewings at Word Wenches
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Bay trees are very easy to grow here, mary Jo. Mine is in a pot, but a friend of mine recently cut hers down as it was getting too big.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Basil, sweet basil! at Word Wenches
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I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I'm not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here's a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/ I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes. I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Basil, sweet basil! at Word Wenches
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Susanna I had a very powerful experience in the ancient stadium at Delphi, too. Never forgotten it, even though I was only 21 at the time. Am so thrilled you've joined the word wenches. Wenchly readers, if you care to look back through our "what we're reading" recommendations, you'll see how often Susanna's books have come up.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Saying Hello... at Word Wenches
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The new Word Wench will be launching her first post tomorrow (Monday, US time.) Please make her welcome. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Word Wenches
Heres another article about it -- http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/life/463498/How-to-have-perfect-table-manners-and-etiquette-at-a-dinner-party And theres an image of a knife being held like a pen here. The handle of the knife protrudes between the thumb and forefinger. http://depositphotos.com/9089543/stock-illustration-position-of-the-knife-held.html A correctly held knife is braced under the palm. http://www.naijaloaded.com.ng/2015/08/04/share-your-experience-of-using-fork-and-knife-to-eat-for-the-first-time/
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The Story of a Fork at Word Wenches
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Karin, thanks -- Ive never read Robyn Carrs historicals. I must hunt them out. I really enjoy a good medieval.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Sue, I hear you on the needing to limit book purchases. My house is drowning in books.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Mary, its lovely when a friend wins, isnt it? I was thrilled to see Maisy Yates won her section, too. Shes friends with some of my friends and Ive met her at conferences. Thanks for joining in the discussion.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Janga, Im so sorry to hear youve been ill. I have been following YOUR recommendations for years. (For those who dont know, Janga also reviews on the site PJ runs — The Romance Dish—http://www.theromancedish.comand used to have her own blog as well.) Ive lost track of how many authors Ive discovered through your recommendations. You also deserve a VFA (Very Fine Award) for your services to readers.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Excellent choices, Stefanie — thanks.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Aw, thank you, PJ. :)
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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And their knives. I remember when I was about fifteen and came home from a sleepover at a friends house, and had picked up what I thought was her familys cool way of holding their knives — like a pen. My mother was utterly scathing! And I chuckled when I saw a reference to that in the UK article I linked to in my previous comment.
Toggle Commented Jul 22, 2016 on The Story of a Fork at Word Wenches
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The Romance Dish, Margaret — with lots of reviews and author interviews. http://www.theromancedish.com
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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There is an excellent, slightly tongue-in-cheek article about the decline of British table manners here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/11941132/Misusing-a-knife-and-fork-is-the-eighth-and-deadliest-sin.html
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The Story of a Fork at Word Wenches
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The English/European conventions — spoons and knives in the right hand, forks in the left — are the convention here, although like many other aspects of our culture, the American influence is seeping in, and you will see some people transferring their fork to the right hand. My parents and grandparents were very strict about table manners and on my last visit to the US I felt quite daring when I occasionally transferred my fork over. I could almost feel Nana's hand hovering, ready to smack me. She's also hovering when I use good Chinese and Japanese manners and drink from the bowl. And the way to eat peas off the rounded back of the fork is to have some other vegetable and maybe a little sauce or gravy on first and then add the peas. Honey would be no good. If the peas were hot, the honey would melt. *g*
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The Story of a Fork at Word Wenches
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Thanks Monique -- yes it's often not my fave of an authors work that wins, and its a good reminder of how readers' taste is so very subjective and variable. I mostly knew the books in the historical categories, and a few of the contemporary ones. A few of my friends were listed, too, so of course I'd read their books.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Ah, thanks Shannon. I haven't read many M/M romances — a few, mostly CS Pacat and Sarina Bowen when she wrote with Elle Kennedy.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Shannon — I haven't read her, but will now on your recommendation.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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PJ you OUGHT to be an award winner — your blog and the way you support the genre and authors is worthy of a VFA! (very fine award) I was a bit teary, too through Kristan's speech and Robyn's reply. And yes, the lists always entice me to buy more books, too.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Looks like you've read most of the historicals, Stefanie. Which ones would you have picked as your winners if you were a judge?
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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Annette, as someone who has finalled in the RITA five times and never won, Im sure it is a HUGE rush! And even Jo Beverley, who won five RITAs in her lifetime, never took it for granted.
Toggle Commented Jul 21, 2016 on The RITAs at Word Wenches
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