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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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" I hear bonk as in hitting but I don't remember when I last heard boink (or bonk, for that matter) for sex. They use the F word now." No, but that's what I'm saying. I think "bonk" in the sexual sense is commonly used and understood in the UK and Australia, though probably not in the USA. I'd never heard or seen "boink" until Mary Jo used it.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Marianne Nice that some of the books are available in e-form. It would be lovely if someone tracked down Maggie Osborne (or her publishers) and encouraged them to get them all put up in e.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Wonderful post, Susan. One of my most beloved books as a child — and I still have it — is a big old book called Fairy Tales from Other Lands, and it contains fairy tales from a wide range of cultures. One of my favorite illustrators of fairy tales is Arthur Rackham.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on On Fairy Tales at Word Wenches
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Thanks for this, Vicki. I'll keep an eye out for Elswyth Thane's Williamsburg series
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Kanch, that's very true. Tastes and attitudes change as you mature. I think I did try one Judith McNaught book, but I can't remember which one it was, and it mustn't have caught my fancy because I don't have any of her books on my shelves (and I have a lot of shelves.) Usually when I glom an author I buy and keep the books, because I like to reread. For me, favorite books are like old friends. There are a few authors from the 90's that I glommed when I first discovered US romance novels (and learned the word 'glommed') and I'm planning to reread some of them. We'll see how they look to me now.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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That's a great scene, isn't it, Constance? I do like that movie. Thank you for the Elswyth Thayne recommendation — what a lovely old-fashioned name that is. I haven't heard of her, but I'll certainly look her up.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Janice, I just googled boinking, to see where it's used and this came up: I do think it's one of those tomahto/tomayto things. bonk/bɒŋk/ verb hit (someone or something). have sexual intercourse. (of a cyclist or runner) reach a point of exhaustion that makes it impossible to go further.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Must be another aussie/US thing -- we say bonking meaning sex (not boinking) and we also use it for bonking someone over the head.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Sorry, Shannon -- "bonking" is a term that's quite commonly understood in the UK and Australia, so I assumed it would be familiar to North Americans, too. But we also say "She bonked him over the head," making the context clear. So, what should I say that's not rude? *g*
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Give me lords and ladies and indoor plumbing! You and a million lovers of regencies and similar settings. But for those of us who grew up in small towns and cities, the western is a joy.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Shannon, I love Carla Kelly's books. She's an honorary WordWench -- did you know? I interviewed her once. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/12/carla-kelly.html "Too many authors fail to capture how hard life is on a ranch or a farm. A great deal of time is spent cleaning up after animals and moving that waste to gardens and fields. Not romantic at all." LOL -- as someone whose first paid job involved picking up cat and dog poop in a boarding kennels, I do understand. And though I didn't grow up on a farm, my family background was on the land, and I remember some of my father's stories from when he was a boy. Backbreaking work and, in the end, for my paternal grandparents at least, heartbreaking. But the best writers still manage to convey the hard work and still spin the romance alive. It's always a balance between reality and fantasy. "And because stories need to move forward, there's little sense of how long it takes to get from one place to another. I cannot count how many hours of my life were spent in cars and pick-ups getting to things. We thought nothing about driving 2 hours to a football games and 2 hours back, doing the same thing for debate on Saturday, and then the obligatory trip to town for Sunday school and church. Life is slow in the country for the most part, but that doesn't make for exciting stories." Ah, but that's the joy of fiction -- we can skip those bits, saying, "The journey took ten days and by the end of it Shannon wondered if any of her bones were still attached, such was the incessant jolting of the wagon" or whatever.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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I'm also with Elaine--when a twit historial heroine in deep trouble refuses a husband who can and will support her because he doesn't "love" her, it's a real eye-roller for me. Yes, especially when it's pretty obvious he does love her -- it's only the words he hasn't said. Of course, the words ARE important, but not at the expense of a girl's reputation/ societal standing/future is at stake. We need to do a Maggie Osborne campaign to coax her books out into e-form! Yes indeed, Mary Jo. I think they'd do really well. Other readers, I'm sure, would do as I've done and hunt her books down -- and it would be SO much easier if it was a matter of a click on an e-reader.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Eileen, yes, that's so true. " I think real women were more realistic about their options or lack thereof than what we find in many romance novels." I also think a lot of people fell in love after marriage. It's one of the reasons I like the Marriage of Convenience trope. I actually know quite a few people who barely knew their husbands before they were married, but who have had long and happy marriages. Whether or not they ever had that intense falling in love experience though, I don't really know. As always, in writing historicals, there is the problem of respecting the mores of the day, and keeping the fantasy relevant to modern readers. They (we) do want that "I love you" declaration from the hero, don't we?
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Janga, I'm thinking we should start a campaign to have Maggie Osborne's books reissued in e-form. I have The Seduction of Samantha Kincade on order - from a used bookshop somewhere in the US -- but I didn't know she also wrote as Margaret St. George. Guess who'll be hunting for those books too, now? *g* I always find it interesting to compare an author's work when they write different kinds of books or under different names.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Maggie Osborne: A Romance Classic at Word Wenches
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Recently I've been discovering some of the older style historical romances. Some time back, on the wenches private loop, Jo Beverley mentioned Maggie Osborne's The Promise of Jenny Jones and out of curiosity I went looking for it. I bought it on line, read it and loved it. So fresh and original and good. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Word Wenches
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And then there was always the possibility of being shot by one of their own men. Great blog, Jo.
Toggle Commented Sep 6, 2014 on Buying a "pair of colours." at Word Wenches
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Thanks, I'll try them. Love that title, Agathat Rasin and The Quiche of Death. And you need to watch Hamish Macbeth from episode 1, too, I think. The quiet deadpan humor is delicious, and the Scottish accents lovely and not too hard (IMO) to understand.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2014 on What We're Reading in August at Word Wenches
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Have you seen the Hamish Macbeth TV series, Janice. Wonderfully funny. I haven't tried the Agatha Raisin books, but they're at my local library, I think, so I'll give them a go. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2014 on What We're Reading in August at Word Wenches
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I also enjoyed Marion Chesney's books many years ago. I tried her MC Beaton books, but because I'd already fallen in love with the TV series of Hamish Macbeth, I found it hard to bond with the original version. Perhaps it's time for another read of them.
Toggle Commented Aug 31, 2014 on What We're Reading in August at Word Wenches
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Anne here, interviewing Mary Jo Putney about NOT QUITE A WIFE, which goes on sale tomorrow. Library Journal called it, "another memorable masterpiece from one of the genre's best. Gorgeously done." Kirkus Reviews said: "Elegant and tender; a compelling sweep of romance and adventure with a gratifying undertone of social justice elements." Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2014 at Word Wenches
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It was a wonderful location, PJ -- and I had a great time with you, too. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2014 on Conference with pics at Word Wenches
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Vanessa, it was great that you could come. It was a lovely gathering, wasn't it?
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2014 on Conference with pics at Word Wenches
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Hi Bona -- I'm not sure if we'll publish anything about the debate — it was primarily an entertainment and there was a good deal of laughter and joshing around. But it has raised some thoughts — I really think we need better definitions of alpha and beta heroes. The wenches have been discussing it off line.
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2014 on Conference with pics at Word Wenches
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MJ I wandered all around the riverwalk area all on my own and found it very safe and comfortable and interesting. I ate some great food, drank one or two fine margaritas, heard some good music and honestly, I couldn't have been happier. I thought it was brilliant.
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2014 on Conference with pics at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Donna, I'm, back at work now, thanks, working hard on the next story.
Toggle Commented Aug 22, 2014 on Conference with pics at Word Wenches
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