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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Oh my -- this is all SO TRUE!!!! Susanna. So contemporary. I kept copying bits to put on writers' group pages, and then would find a paragraph down another even more relevant piece of advice, and then another few paragraphs down, yet another one. LOL. She's brilliant!
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Conduct to Literary Women at Word Wenches
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Teresa, I'm also one who generally uses full words and punctuation in texts. I think emails and texts have made communication so much easier and more immediate and everyday, which is great. It does bring family (and friends) closer, I think. But a proper hand-written letter was an event, and I think that's what I miss. Mind you there days, there's very little news left to share in a letter anyway, with Facebook etc. I know what you mean about obvious mistakes. Just last night I started a book fairly recently published and by an author I really admire, and yet she called one of her characters Sir Surname, which is so wrong and just basic if you're writing a historical containing aristocrats. It was odd as the rest of her research was so good. Luckily it was a minor character and the rest of the writing and the story was so good I was able to ignore it.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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What a wonderful thing for your aunt to have found, Mary -- and thank goodness she valued them and sent them to you. Too many people toss out old letters when doing that sort of clean out.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary -- the thing is, for probably 90% of readers getting the details right doesn't matter. But for the other 10% it does. Authors do their best to get things right, but we all slip up at some stage, despite best intentions. As for google -- there's a lot of great info on the web, but also some misinformation. All we can do is do our best to get as much right as we can. But in the long run, it's the story that counts.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Joy, your stationery sounds beautiful. Having really good quality writing paper is a luxury and makes for a wonderful writing experience.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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I think that's exactly it, Laura, and so it's never simply a piece of paper the heroines use, it's always foolscap! LOL
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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I'm a bit the same, Mary Jo -- and I have some really lovely journals that have never been written on for the same reason. But, you know, handwriting conveys the person so much better. One of my friends recently produced a dreadful scrawled letter of mine sent when we were teenagers, and containing some truly horrible stick-figure illustrations. She loved it and had kept it all this time.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Susan, how wonderful that that piece of paper survived so long. Small, seemingly insignificant and yet so powerful and poignant. When I hear that people have tossed away or burned a pile of old letters and documents, the woman-who-needs-to-declutter understands, but the packrat and historian in me winces.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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I remember those aerogram sheets -- I probably still have a few in my boxes of collected letters. My mum used them a lot -- and yes, she's squeeze in every word she could. Letters are important, especially in this age where people are often so far apart, but I think Skype and phone and email have replaced them.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Ah, I recognise another stationery junkie. I think that's part of what's behind the popularity of card-making -- people want to make something that's unique and personal. I wrote scads of letters in my teens, too, and that' only dropped off once I got started on email.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Shannon, how special to have that particular letter your father write you. That's the joy of having things in writing -- you can read them over and over. That postcard service sounds like a great service. I have a couple of cards that friend have sent me, using photos they took.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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"Thanks for talking about the size of foolscap. I always thought of it as "scrap" paper or what was used to write a draft of something." Yes, that's how it's been treated in some of the books I've read, and why I wanted to correct the misapprehension. Foolscap was in use in schools when I was a child -- my older brother and sisters used it in high school, so I have actual experience of how big it is. I think it's that 'foolscap" contains the word "fool" that makes people assume it's some scrap.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Sue, I think a lot of us do in fact adore email, while bemoaning the loss of real paper letters -- after all, what do we use every day? *g* Email is so immediate and easy that it fosters closeness, and as well, people are often less formal in email than they are in letters, which adds a different flavor. I think perhaps we get so much email that it's not as special as a real letter. I know I start most days with a stack of emails to answer and send, whereas in my letter writing days it was much less of a pile, so perhaps n=more of a pleasure to be anticipated.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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"When you know a lot about something it's so hard to overlook mistakes" That's very true, Sonya, and when a book is published it goes to such a wide range of experts. What a shame your postcards didn't arrive -- I always send lots of letters and cards when I'm travelling and I've never had any trouble. Then again, I don't exactly check. Have a great trip to Europe.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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I think it wasnt so much that paper was so costly (though it wasnt cheap) but that postage was expensive (unless you had a lord who could frank it for you for free) and the poat was charged per sheet of paper used. So you got the most you could out of the paper you had.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary -- yes I think letters were more thoughtfully written. Though possibly not as frequent as email. But I cant imagine anyone printing off and bundling up a collection of emails to keep, as people used to bundle up letters.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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That's a lovely idea, Mel. I think you're right about people enjoying on-line shopping because they get real mail. I love writing and receiving letters, but these days I tend to only write them when I'm away. And even then, email is easier.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Regency Notepaper at Word Wenches
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A gentle rant about Regency-era letters and notes, and how heroines don't grab a sheet of foolscap to dash off a quick note. The thing is, foolscap is a big sheet of paper. It's probably fine if you want to write a long letter, but it's not the paper you'd use to dash off a note — especially if you are a lady with pretensions to elegance, and what Regency heroine is not? Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Word Wenches
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Belated happy Christmas, Sonya. Don't worry about the double posting -- I get all kinds of glitches. And if I comment using the email reply facility, for some reason typepad leaves off all my apostrophes. So then I have to go in and edit each of my comments and put them back.
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Teresa, I don't know -- I've never used spelt flour. But I'd try it and see. I think I've used soy milk -- I know I've made it for a friend who doesn't eat cow-products. But it's a small and easy recipe to make, so it's not hard to try it out and experiment. Let us know how you went.
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Sue, the bread I mentioned is very easy to make -- no kneading required -- in fact I think kneading makes it heavier -- like scones (or US biscuits) It's a bit like Australian damper, or Irish soda bread. http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/international/european/british/potato-bread-with-goats-cheese-and-thyme
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Carolyn, that sounds like a lot of fun. I wish my local nursery did that. I'd be in it like a shot.
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2017 on Twelfth Night at Word Wenches
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I still have a copy of True Colours, Nicola. *g*
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2017 on Twelfth Night at Word Wenches
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The cheese and rocket bread sounds yummy, Nicola. I often make Delia Smith's goats cheese and thyme bread -- it's delish with soup. I have never been to a Christmas Panto and I know I'd love it if I did. If I'm ever in the UK at Christmas, I'll go to one.
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My mum used to say the same about cleaning, Suzanne. I think that's the tough thing about housework and cooking -- it's usually taken for granted — until you stop doing it. *g*
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2017 on The Holiday House at Word Wenches
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