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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Janga, what wonderful recommendations. I love Anne Tyler's writing, and will immediately order A Spool of Blue Thread (love that title). And I might have to try How to be a Heroine as well. It sounds delightful. Yes to not following Catherine Earnshaw. Might have to read Cold Comfort farm for the umpteenth time, too. And you can never go wrong with Mary Balogh. I'm so glad you pop in here sometimes with your recommendations — I miss your blog.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on What We're Reading in February at Word Wenches
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CS Harris is wonderful. Do you know she also used to write historical romance as Candace Proctor -- also highly recommended.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on What We're Reading in February at Word Wenches
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Quantum, three more wenches have joined you in buying Imperfect Chemistry, and one other has bought Lord of the Fading Lands, so you're in good company. We can compare notes. :) I haven't read Terry Goodkind — thank you for the recommendation. I, too used to read a lot of fantasy. Among others, I liked the Marion Zimmer Bradley Darkover series.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on What We're Reading in February at Word Wenches
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Prema, that's very true. Some romances are wonderfully deep and memorable, others are light and fun and forgettable. I enjoy both kinds -- it depends on my mood. And this is so true as well, I think: "t the stories when done well deal with relationships and the way they shape the individual and their journey in life. My life experience also tells me this. Women in particular pay more attention to how they relate to family, community and friends. " And that is probably one reason why romances appeal to women more than men.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Fi -- and it IS a word. :)
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Vicki, "angsty" is indeed a real word -- I just looked up the Oxford English Dictionary and though it was added in 2005, the first recorded written use of it was in 1956. So -- it's official. *g* " ˈangsty adj. characterized by angst. 1956 Oxf. Mag. 75 84/2 (heading) Angsty young men. 2003 A. Greenwald Nothing feels Good ii. 31 The kids in high school liked moshing to the angsty sounds of grunge, but it didn't make them feel any better when they were home alone in their bedrooms."
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Sue, I identify heavily with this comment of yours: ""If I escape tonight after the kids are in bed and come back to work refreshed tomorrow, why is that a bad thing?"" Before I was able to support myself as a writer, I was in a busy and stressful job, with lots of extra responsibilities, and reading for fun was a way to unwind. I'd dive into another world, another time, another person's life, and my own realities would settle. I pity anyone who's never read for joy and escapism.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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She's wonderful isn't she Linda? I devoured the books as a kid, and then tracked them down to own as an adult, because Eagle of the Ninth stayed with me. I learned a lot of history through Rosemary Sutcliff -- and never even realized I was learning. It was just a good story -- but I absorbed so much about the time. I think we should write to her publishers and urge them to make her books available as e-books. What a treat to be able to buy all our old favorites again.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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I completely agree, HJ -- It''s so short-sighted (and arrogant) to dismiss a whole genre -- especially one so popular -- by deciding it mustn't be worth reading. It's like saying you'll eat only green vegetables, or reading books with an orange cover. Or you'll only walk if it's a marathon -- not merely stroll for a pleasant walk —that everything worthy has to be serious. It's a very strange mindset.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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I agree, Merry -- I have a list of books I give to people who think romance is pure fluff. And romance novels have given me some characters who've lived in my head for years.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Bona, I so agree. "Some books are wonderful food for my brain, others are just for fun. There's a moment for everything in life." I don't understand the reading of book after book that you don't enjoy, especially if that's all you read. It's a bit too much like the old Victorian era habit of taking a dose of castor oil because "it does you good." Reading is for all kinds of reasons, including for fun and pleasure and to make you feel happy. And romance does that best, IMO.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Mary, yes, Wuthering Heights isn't what I call a romance though it is romantic in the broader sense. But there are plenty of books in which relationships that I consider abusive are portrayed as romances. A lot of people don't agree -- they love them and see them as a journey. It's a taste thing -- those books aren't my cup-of-tea, but if others enjoy them, fine. I love this: "Barbara Metzger's Miss Lockharte's Letters has to be my all-time favorite with its amazing opening line: "I'm dying, and I never even had a dog." Thanks for contributing to the discussion.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Greyfriars Bobby is a true story, Cate, of a little dog that visited his dead master's grave every day for years afterward. Here's the link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyfriars_Bobby
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Shannon, how exciting to be ushering in a new little reader to a world of wonderful books. I can imagine the shoals, though -- I know when I sent a friend some of my childhood faves, I was later horrified when I reread them and found some underlying racism, etc. -- none of which I'd remembered. However my friend was fine with that -- she said it was a good point of discussion. The other lovely thing is that through your daughter you'll find some wonderful new authors. I know when I was teaching junior high school kids I found some fabulous new-to-me authors. I think a good children's book is readable and enjoyable to all age-groups.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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COMPETITION! Susan D/C got five out of six correct, so she wins the prize, which is a book from me. She correctly guessed the following: 1) The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Graham (I wasn't thinking of this, but it certainly fits the description. 2) Faraway Tree books by Enid Blyton 3) The Borrowers by Mary Norton 5) Lassie Come Home by Eric Knight ( Again not what I had in mind but it fits the description 6) Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff Where we differed was: 1) The stories I was particularly thinking of were the "Pookie" stories by Ivy Wallace — about a magical flying rabbit. http://www.amazon.com/Ivy-Wallace/e/B0034P8NFC/wordwenches0b-20 4) There were heaps of "kids foil crooks" stories — I was thinking of Enid Blyton's " of Adventure" novels, or the Famous Five or her "Mystery of" series or any number of boarding school stories - of which Harry Potter is a descendant. 5) Finn the Wolfhound by A.J. Dawson was the book I was thinking of -- a wonderful story of a wolfhound who is kidnapped and abused and managed to escape and find his way home. But there are lots of other stories of this kind — The Incredible Journey is another—all of which I devoured and wept through as a child. And as an adult I wept through Nop's Trials just the same and hugged by dog every 10 minutes while reading it. :)
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Very good answers, Cate — It wasn't the Narnia books I was thinking of, or Lassie — I didn't even know there were Lassie books, only the Lassie movies -- but they certainly fit the criteria, and I'm being flexible about the answers, so you're definitely in the lead now for the contest. I've been enjoying everyone's suggestions and, in fact, it's made me wonder if beloved childen's books might make a fun subject for one of my quizzes. Thanks so much for joining in. "I want the sparkling dialogue, with a sprinkle of peril that leaves me heaving a sigh of contentment, and wearing a smile when I finish the book." -- Have you read Eva Ibbotson? I've long been a devotee of her romantic novels for adults -- and I'm now working my way through her books for children. Delightful.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Linnea -- yes it was the Enid Blyton . . . of Adventure books I was thinking of—I have some here that I have collected over the years -- though I'm also willing to accept similar kind of stories, because I know not all readers in all countries have the same books. Even Harry Potter would --kind of-- fit that style. So far Susan/DC has got the most answers for my little off-the-cuff competition. Re Laura Inglass Wilder -- I saw somewhere there was a biography of her out recently — put out by local a historical society -- that contains all kinds of interesting revelations about her life and family. Google it and you'll find out more. Apparently the first edition sold out instantly. I don't mind books that make me cry in a good way — but I don't want to read books or watch movies that will haunt my imagination with awfulness for long afterward. Thanks for joining in the conversation.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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"" Say what?? Once??? Ohh myyy." Yes indeed. Because ALL romances are exactly alike, and written to a recipe/formula aren't they? And despite the fact that it's the biggest-selling genre in popular fiction -- that's not because there are so many wonderful books out there that satisfy readers, it's because the readers are lemmings...or something. <g> I find it quite amazing. People wouldn't judge the whole crime genre because they read an Agatha Christie once and didn't like it. Or expect all crime novels to be like Agatha Christies. But they do that with romance. I love the borrowers too, Artemisia -- wonderful books and I saw some of the TV adaptation they made of the books and they looked wonderful too. As for the old and yellowed copies, I have been known to buy tatty old copies of beloved books from second hand stalls just because I couldn't stand seeing them there -- they deserve better treatment. :) That habit occasionally proves useful because if I find out someone I know who loves reading hasn't read it, I have a spare copy to press on them.
Toggle Commented Feb 21, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Helen -- that is *exactly* why I think more people should read romance. Having fun! :)
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Mary Jo, Venetia is one of my favorite Heyers, but I think Friday's Child was a wonderful book to be recounting in dark and hopeless circumstances because there's nothing grim at all in the story, and there is all that delightful nonsense with that collection of frivolous young men. I still get a chuckle every time at the Nemesis thread.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Susan — your guesses were very close -- a few spot on, some others not quite, but you're definitely in the running for the prize. I'm so pleased you discovered Rosemary Sutcliff through your son's reading — the book I referred to at the end was indeed Eagle of the Ninth. Marvelous story.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Beautifully said, Lillian — I completely agree, and feel sorry for people who think themselves "above" romance novels. They miss out on some lovely books.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Thanks, John -- yes I think Heyer's Infamous Army has been given to soldiers at Sandhurst to learn from — the battle sections, rather than the romance, I'm guessing. :) Good luck with your book.
Toggle Commented Feb 20, 2015 on Celebrating Romance Novels at Word Wenches
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Anne here, cursing because my laptop has just died with today's blog locked in it. And since I am due to go out in less than an hour, I have decided to cheat slightly and expand on a piece I wrote for Bobbi Dumas's 2014 "celebrate romance" event. (As illustration I'm using the cover of my next book, coming in June. This blog isn't about that, but I couldn't resist sharing the lovely cover..) Why celebrate romance novels? 1) Because they're fun. When I was a kid almost all my reading was for fun. I would get lost in worlds,... Continue reading
Posted Feb 19, 2015 at Word Wenches
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I so envy you, Nicola having all these wonderful places to visit. I'm not terribly interested in fashion as such, but I do enjoy looking at costume displays, especially when they're given some kind of context. Probably my favorite era for fashion is the edwardian and leading into the early 1900's -- Paul Poiret kind of thing.
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