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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Anne here, and today I'm pondering the power of scent to stimulate memory. Scent is so powerful, isn't it, and yet we have so few words to describe scents, except to say "like a lemon" or "like new mown grass." It's always struck me as an oddity in the language. I suppose we all experience our own individual version of "scent of lemon" or "scent of fresh-cut grass" so we don't need a special word for it. Maybe. It's something I do sometimes in my books — draw on my own scent-memories to create similar-yet-different experiences for my characters. Imagining... Continue reading
Posted 4 hours ago at Word Wenches
A lot of fruits and vegetables have changed names as well as appearances. Purple carrots are making a comeback here -- that dark colour was bred out of them. And when I was a kid we ate "Chinese gooseberries" -- until the NZers started a huge and clever marketing campaign and now half the world calls them Kiwi fruit. So I can't say whether or not I have eaten a skirret. A skirret by any other name would, I presume, taste as sweet :)
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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Susanna I'm so glad you shared this story. I love the idea of escaping to another country and holing up in a little cottage to research and write. I'd love to do that one day.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on That Winter in Wales at Word Wenches
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Barbara, it sounds like we have quite a few early books in common. I can quote chunks of AAM Milne poetry — particularly from When We Were Very Young -- no doubt dating from when my parents and older siblings (they were a lot older) read it aloud to me. And I adored the Finn Family Moomintroll — still have a couple of those books on my shelves. But I havent read them for ages, so might pull them down and have a catch up. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Kathy, I just googled Hank the Cowdog and I think Id better grab a copy, just to know. I do like dog stories and my nephew has a baby boy who is growing up with dogs and I could pass it on to him afterwards. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Sue, I know theres a school of thought that says scary/gory fairytales are good for children, but give me the sanitized ones every time. I *still* fret about why nobody helped the poor little match girl, and I hated the story of the red shoes, where a little girl was subjected to a dreadful punishment, simply for wanting pretty shoes. That Arrow Rock story rings a slight bell with me -- the occasional American (and canadian) story crossed the Pacific. And I didnt know there was an American Winston Churchill. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Faith — glad you enjoyed it.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Im so glad, Teresa. I hope you get well soon. In the meantime, watch out for that sudsy water coming your way and treat yourself to a pop-toffee.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary Jo. Yes it was pretty special recognizing my own environment and knowing there was/could be tiny beings living among the most ordinary plants and flowers. Not just insects and other bugs, but little people. *g*
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Teresa, I loved Enid Blytons stories -- they were a godsend for a bookworm like me who was always running out of books to read. The faraway Tree series was a favourite -- I loved the saucepan-man who kept mistaking things, and Dame Washalot whose suds soaked everyone, and the worlds that came and went at the top of the tree. And I yearned to go on the slippery side inside the tree. My older sister owns a lot of my beloved childhood books, but i bought a set of the Faraway Tree (and others) for myself as an adult.
Toggle Commented Nov 26, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Annette. I do love our pink cockatoos -- they're called galahs, and they are funny as well as lovely. Natural clowns. In summer I often see them grazing the ovals where I walk my dog.
Toggle Commented Nov 25, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Yes, Sonya, it's almost impossible to grow up in Australia and not be touched by Snugglepot and Cuddlepie. I also remember that John Marsden book -- Tomorrow When the World Began -- grim stuff, but thought provoking. I never did see the movie
Toggle Commented Nov 25, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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They look lovely, Oana-Maria. May Gibbs also had some underwater babies, too. A magical imaginary world.
Toggle Commented Nov 25, 2016 on Snugglepot and Cuddlepie at Word Wenches
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Anne here, and no, you can relax — I'm not talking about a particularly mushy romance. While a lot of readers are recovering from Thanksgiving celebrations, I'm thinking about beloved children's books — specifically books set in nature. When I was a child growing up in Australia, most of the children's stories I knew came from other countries — from England and Europe and other lands — particularly English classics. I've blogged before about my love of AA Milne's tales of Winne the Pooh. And I loved Enid Blyton's tales of Cherry Tree Farm (and others) where I learned about... Continue reading
Posted Nov 25, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Wishing everyone, no matter where you live, a Happy Thanksgiving — because we all have something to be thankful for. Here's the famous Norman Rockwell painting in the Freedom from Want series -- better known as "the Thanksgiving Painting." With best wishes from all the Word Wenches. Continue reading
Posted Nov 24, 2016 at Word Wenches
Mary, I laughed at "I've never shoveled any sunshine yet." As for driving -- that's what most people here do with snow -- drive somewhere to see it, because we only really get it in the mountains.
Toggle Commented Nov 16, 2016 on Winter Delights at Word Wenches
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Welcome back to the WordWenches, Amanda. I did know most of this history, and am looking forward to reading your book. But I am sad to learn that the "black Irish/Armarda survivors tales are myth -- I've been told that all my life, too. I think I might choose to keep believing. :)
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I hadnt even heard of it, Kareni -- the movie, that is. Might have a look for it -- John Cleeses voice is used for one of the characters.
Toggle Commented Nov 8, 2016 on Meet Emily Larkin at Word Wenches
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Kareni, when I was a kid, we had this book called The Magic Pudding, which was a bit like your soup pot -- it was a magically renewing pudding -- pudding in the broadest sense, which savory meat pudding and sweet puddings when you were finished. Nobody who had a magic pudding would ever go hungry. But bad people kept trying to steal it because it was a potential fortune on legs . . . And he (Albert, the pudding) did have legs, too -- google it and youll see a picture.
Toggle Commented Nov 7, 2016 on Meet Emily Larkin at Word Wenches
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Shannon, Im so glad you enjoyed Emilys Fey Quartet. Those What Were Reading monthly posts are addictive, arent they? I always end up buying several books from Wenchly recommendations.
Toggle Commented Nov 7, 2016 on Meet Emily Larkin at Word Wenches
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Anne here, and today it's my pleasure to welcome Emily Larkin to the Word Wenches. I first met Emily at a romance writers' conference in Australia — she's a New Zealander, and she was writing Regency Historical romance (under the name of Emily May for Harlequin Historicals) so of course, because I'm always interested in new Regency writers, I read her first book. And immediately bought the next two. She's the kind of Regency writer who Gets Things Right — I suspect she was raised on Georgette Heyer. She also writes darker fantasy novels as Emily Gee — in fact... Continue reading
Posted Nov 6, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Suzanne, I sometimes make a big trifle to take to a summertime party or barbecue and it always disappears in a flash!
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I'm very fond of Mary Stewart's TOUCH NOT THE CAT, Vicki. I think my faves are still MADAM WILL YOU TALK and NINCE COACHES WAITING -- but they are not Hallowe'en reads.
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2016 on What We're Reading: Ghostly Tales at Word Wenches
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There are vampires in the Bec McMaster books I recommended, Susan -- they're the rules of the ton.
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2016 on What We're Reading: Ghostly Tales at Word Wenches
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Deb, in this house buying jewelry is like bringing coals to Newcastle -- though sadly, Im always tempted to buy new stuff. And yesterday I headed out to my fave jewelry supplies place and bought me some gorgeous dark-green pearls, which I will turn into a necklace. Which is, I admit, likebringing coals to Newcastle, because I have so many pearls already. But not big fat dark greeny-blue ones. *g*
Toggle Commented Nov 1, 2016 on Finishing a book at Word Wenches
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