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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Bona, I have a habit of keeping paper clutter, too — craft projects I think I'll do one day, recipes I keep meaning to try, but know I never will — even my mother's recipe collections of stuff pulled from magazine. I know I need to toss most of it — and I will. I *ought* to toss it all unseen and unsorted — I'm sure it would make no difference to me, because I haven't used any of them in ages. Just have to bite the bullet. I wonder whether the "one year" rule could work for paperwork as well. A friend of mine once shared an office with a woman who at the end of every year went right through her filing cabinet and emptied out almost everything from it. She started each year with a pile of empty files.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Oh, then that does complicate the matter. Curses! Home-made relish is not to be sneezed at. *g*
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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LOL Donna. Read the reviews of this book on amazon and it will give you a head start.
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Those are good questions to ask yourself, Donna. Lucky you to be trained in purging young. I am envious of people who seem to come by it naturally -- which means having a parent who taught the skill and passed on the attitude.
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Lynne, I has the exact same experience, only I was delighted. A friend emailed me for a box of jam jars, because I always save them too. Only this time I didn't have any. Pooh to them I say — save your own jam jars.*g*
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Shannon, I also add shelves to cheap bookcases to squeeze in more books. And moving is a huge help in forcing you to get rid of excess stuff. That's my problem — i've been in the same house for ages. Love your attitude. It's taken me forever to get to that point, but now I'm here, it's a great feeling.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Isobel, but I don't need Paulette *g* — I have a friend who offered to help (ie. make) me throw stuff out, but I don't need her either. This book has helped me change my attitude to so many things. I had a major purge, which made a huge difference, but it's still going on — I look at things and think — I don't need that. And into the charity box it goes. I suspect a lot of writers are hoarders — it's the stories in things that make you want to keep them.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Sharlene, I didn't get rid of all my books — I still have um, thousands :) -- but in the past I'd never been able to get rid of *any* books. This time i got rid of all the ones I hadn't finished and never would, or ones i hated, or books I knew I'd never pick up again. I kept all my faves, and the series, and many many more. Can I suggest you get your kids to pack one box of stuff they want to keep and let them choose what stays and what goes. You never know what other people find precious — private little memories, etc.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Yes, regular moving is a compulsory clear-out, isn't it? And I haven't moved for ages, which is part of the problem. But part of my hoarding I think comes from the fact that we moved every year or two when I was a kid, and being the youngest, most of my stuff just disappeared with every move. It made me want to hang onto things more, I suspect.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Sounds good. This book I'm talking about wasn't so much about how to organize your stuff, as about how to unstick your thinking. For me, it was the unsticking the thoughts that was the really valuable part — the reasons I was keeping some things which, when examined, were really dumb reasons. And once I unstuck my thoughts, I was able to toss clutter.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Gram, me too — in fact I have double copies of a few books that are almost falling apart from all the times I've read them. I could still make room by getting rid of more books, I know — and not books I particularly care about, but books that make me think of what I used to read when I was student, or the books I studied at Uni. The Clutter book really helped me to rationalize those thoughts and realize they were no reason to hang onto stuff I really didn't need or want and wasn't likely to again.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Keziah, I'd never get rid of books I'd enjoyed — the ones I gave away were books I hadn't ever finished and new I never would, or books I'd hated. I will always have a book problem — I want any book I like available in hard copy, with no technology needed to read it. I do read e-books these days, but any book that I think is a keeper, I'll order in hard copy to go on my bookshelves. But you're so right about the liberating feeling of getting rid of stuff. And giving it to raise money for a good cause makes you feel doubly good, I think.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Jo, that's it, exactly — my parents were raised by people who used everything to the last shred — and they were the same, and so am I. Recycling comes so naturally to me. :) It made it so hard to throw out things that I didn't want but still were "useful" — but I did. And the more I tossed the easier it became. But you need to be firm with your kids. My mother was the same — many years ago, when I was still a student, she told me she'd toss anything that wasn't gone by easter and she did. She needed to get rid of my clutter to make room for her own. *g*
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Oh, Karen, me too. In fact, being the only daughter in the city where mum and dad lived, my older sisters offloaded heaps of stuff to me. It was hard to get rid of some of these things, but you know, I didn't need all that crockery or the heaps of embroidered doilies or whatever to remember my mum and dad or my grandparents. The book really helped me to deal with this stuff. Here's an idea -- the tea towels are gorgeous, but they're not your memories, so why not choose half a dozen of your favorites, then have a bunch of friends around for a tea-towel party and let them each choose a tea towel — or three. It will be fun, there will be lots of lovely talk about your parents and the tea towels will go to your friends. It's a start, anyway.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Anne, I think part of the problem is that clothes shopping is a pastime, not a necessity. And temptation is everywhere. Great solution to donate two for one new item. I also have the problem — or I used to :) — of keeping clothes for when I'm fatter/slimmer than whatever I am now. I tossed everything that didn't fit me now, and then culled the pile again for things I didn't much like or didn't wear often. I now have spare coat hangers — even gave a pile to the charity shop -- a situation never before experienced in this house. ;)
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2014 on Clutter at Word Wenches
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Anne here, departing from the wenchly historical focus for a little. And having just completed a blog tour to launch The Winter Bride, I'm not going to say another word about it. Not a word! Today I want to talk about clutter. I have a long-running relationship with clutter — I come from a family of pack-rats and hoarders and I can tell you, a background in history only makes the problem worse. When I first studied history one of the things I loved, apart from all the stories, was poring over primary sources, and making inferences and judgements and... Continue reading
Posted Apr 14, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Waving to Alissa -- and to your mother. We were on the Georgette Heyer list together many moons ago, and I remember your first publications. Welcome to the word wench blog and congratulations on your publishing career. Fascinating interview, Mary Jo and Alissa.
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Thanks. I actually used to write multiple choice questions for real exams when I was a teacher, and I'd occasionally slip in a ridiculous answer choice, just to lighten the tension. Glad you enjoyed this.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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Thanks for trying. Well done.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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Thanks Linda. No, Freddy's valet appears for the first time in this book. He might have a continuing role — I haven't decided yet. Thanks for dropping by.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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LOL -- it's not a punishment, Malvina. "Read this book and copy it out 10 times!" *g* Thanks for having a try.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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That's great, Roseanna. Hope you enjoy the book as much.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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Alas, Lynne, the possible subplots can rarely be recycled into other books, as they generally arise out of the particular characters in the books. Each character throws up new possibilities. It's all fun, though.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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LOL Lenore -- No, ALL my Nth American friends are thoroughly fed up with the long, cold winter you've had. In fact I've been worrying that the wintry look of the cover of Winter Bride will make some people want to hurl it against a wall. I hope not. *g*
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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Well done, Sharon. Yes, some of the character stuff you can glean from Autumn Bride. Thanks for having a go. Hope you enjoy Freddy and Damaris.
Toggle Commented Mar 14, 2014 on A quiz with a difference at Word Wenches
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