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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Oh, Marion Chesney -- of course. I was thinking of regencies under the name of MC Beaton, and completely forgot that she wrote as Marion Chesney. And I have read some of them and they're lovely. Sorry. But Haven't read them all, so that's a good reminder to chase them up. Thanks, Janice.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on What We Are Reading at Word Wenches
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Thanks for that Karin — I'm glad you found and enjoyed those old books of mine. They're still favorites for many readers (and me), and some of them are now for sale as e-books, though not in all countries. The ways of amazon and Harlequin can be strange. Thanks too for those other recommendations. I did try one of MC Beaton's Hamish Macbeth books, but I'd already viewed and bonded with the Hamish of the TV series and found I wanted the books to be the same. Might be time to try her regencies.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on What We Are Reading at Word Wenches
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Put me down as one who loves reading makeover scenes — writing them too, though I haven't done many. But it's that fantasy, isn't it, where the plain Jane becomes a swan (she says, mixing metaphors horribly) and of course the hero sees her in a new way -- but best of all, the heroine sees herself in a new way as well, and so we get double the fantasy - the actual change of appearance, and the metaphorical change as well.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Makeover Magic at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those recommendations, Sue — I’ve recently started reading Madeleine L’Engle too. And wouldn’t it be lovely if Mary Balogh was a word wench? She is an honorary Word Wench, though, which is nearly as good. :)
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Hope, I think that's very true. I did refer to that phenomenon briefly, but I was really talking about reviewers, who often don't get a choice in what they read, and have to read and review a lot, so don't get a chance to refresh their palate. But you're right about a number of readers, too. If a book's not my cup of tea, I will put it aside or give it away, but I would never trash it. But some readers feel the need to put every little thought down where the world can read it. So I take all reviews with a grain of salt, and I don't let them influence my buying choice. Thanks for your comment.
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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This reminds me of some of the old Australian cookbooks — a fair bit about meat, a few slender pages on vegies — just peel and boil, except for potatoes which had a range of useful cooking methods— almost nothing on salads, fruit was eaten raw , stewed or bottled (In the US you call that 'canned" I think) and then pages and pages on puddings and desserts and cakes. By guess is they took fruit and vegies for granted — meat was the big deal, and desserts and cakes were the highlight. But I have a Georgian-era housewifery book and there are vegetables included as well as 'sallad', though not as featured dishes — meat and pies dominate the table. And they cooked lettuce! So again, I think this is focussing on what they considered the highlight food — and maybe the upper classes ate mostly that.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on Regency Diet at Word Wenches
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I haven't seen it, Janice. I don't have a TV at the moment and only occasionally watch i-view TV on my computer. If it's not on ABC TV (Australia's version of the BBC) I don't see it. Can't stand the ad's on the commercial stations. Can't turn them down on the computer like I could on the TV.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Oh, Linda, you have a gorrrgeous journey of discovery ahead of you. She's a beautiful write and her stories are lovely. I'm just sorry she only write a handful of the adult stories, but I suppose her children's stories did so well, it must have been a difficult choice to make.
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Cathy I rent a response to this yesterday, but it hasn't come through for some reason. I've never read the birds, but I do understand what you're saying. I don't think movies can ever replicate the experience of books — it's the nature of the medium — movies are visual, whereas books happen inside the imagination, and are therefore only limited by that. We can read character's thoughts, sense their emotions etc, whereas movies can't go there. But after your description, I'm going to have to read the story -- thank you.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Thanks for these recommendations, Karin — I've chased them up and for anyone who's interested here is the Rose Lerner interview on Smart Bitches: http://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/podcast/121-talking-historicals-with-rose-lerner/ And the mutual interviews with Rose Lerner and Theresa Roman are here: http://theresaromain.com/2015/01/09/a-chat-with-rose-lerner/ and here http://roselerner.com/blog/2015/01/09/welcome-theresa-romain-and-her-awesome-books/
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Karin, I didn't know he was witty either — these quotes (or references to them) that my friend gave me have made me think I might have to read him now. My mother was a huge reader of travel books. I've read that Laurie Lee one, though I've never really thought of it as a travel book (though it is.) I have yet to read Bill Bryson, who many people have recommended. Eastern Approaches sounds like something I might look up, too -- thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Shannon, you're the first person I've heard of who loves their first pair of multi-focals! Most people take a while to get used to them, I believe. Lovely that you love yours. I have the hunger games books but haven't started on them yet. Am a bit of a wimp about violence and not sure I'll enjoy them. Love Margaret Atwood, but don't know the Maddaddam series — will chase them up.. Enjoy the long weekend and your excellent new glasses!
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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That's an interesting alternative, Lorraine. I often leaf through my cookbooks, and I know I read Elizabeth David for the writing, not just the recipes, but I don't do it widely. You're right though — it's the writing and the personalities that come through that make them interesting. I follow a couple of foodie/cooks blogs for that very reason — rarely do I use the recipes, but I enjoy the writing. David Lebovitz is a blog I read for that reason. I will have to read "The Disappearing Spoon" -- the idea of the periodic table being fascinating sounds . . . fascinating. *g* Thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Madge, Daughter of Time was my first Josephine Tey, too and started me reading her. I've read the Miles Vorkosian series, too, though not for ages. But I've never heard of Peter Robinson, so thanks for that recommendation. And i recently started a Dorothy Dunnett glom, having finally "clicked" with her. I tried reading her many years ago, and couldn't get into her at all, but this time I persisted past the first 50 pages of Game of Kings and suddenly I was in the book and unable to put it down. Finally I understand what others have been telling me all these years. *g* Thanks for dropping past.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Linda, I just read Tom Holt's addition to the E.F. Benson Mapp and Lucia books — Lucia in Wartime and Lucia Triumphant — not quite EF Benson, but still most enjoyable. I enjoy Barbara Pym, too, though it's been a while since I read her. Have you read Eva Ibbotson's books for adults, set more or less between the wars. Beautiful books. I did an interview with her a few years ago. http://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2009/06/meet-eva-ibbotson.html I acquired all her books as used editions and then to my delight, they reissues them, some with changed titles, and looking like YA books, but they are adult romances most definitely — though not in the sense of sexiness. They are, like Heyer, entirely non-explicit. If you haven't tried them, you have a treat in store.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Thanks for this, Karin — I'll definitely follow it up.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Karen, it's awful when you're feeling jaded, isn't it? For me it's like feeling off-color or ill — I've always had a book on the go, ever since I was able to read, and it feels so wrong when nothing seems to appeal. Fab that you found your cure. I might try it too. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Vicki, I think we have similar tastes in old favorites. I too reread many of the authors you mentioned — don't know how many times I've read Mackenzie's Mountain *g* and AQ, MJP, Kleypas, Heyer, Stewart etc — all in my keeper bookshelves. I have all of Dick Francis's books as well, though I've never heard him on audio book. Might check out my library to see if they have them. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Jana that's interesting. A publisher once told me about an author who sold very well because she was the kind of writer women read — and then handed to their husbands. I don't know many that work the other way around.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Janga, yes, I can see you really keep you brain constantly refreshed with that kind of variety. I don't read poetry nearly as often as I used to. I sometimes feel for reviewers, who have to read so many books for review, regardless of their mood or the state of their reading palate — it must be very difficult to keep up the openeness and keep the jadedness at bay. Rose Lerner is a writer I haven't read, but who I've heard recommended before. Another one for the list. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Sounds like I'd love your "prozac" shelf, Fiona. I, too have a complete set of Heyers and quite a lot of the 'golden age" detective story writers, not to mention my keeper bookcase and the one full of my childhood favorites — like old friends, familiar and beloved. But when I'm jaded I usually need to find something new-to-me and different. Thanks. See you at ARRC.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those recommendations, Anna -- I haven't come across either of those two before. I enjoy the retelling of classic fairytales placed into different settings.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Mary Jo, that's pretty much been my attitude to Chandler, but I was also drawn in by those quotes — I love a playful attitude to language. And my friend's husband was nicely enthusiastic. He said he'd become interested after a mention of something about Chandler's life in a newspaper, and he looked him up, found him interesting as a person, and started reading him. And enjoying him. So, we'll see if I feel the same. And I have earlier confessed that I've never read or seen the Princess Bride, and your post made me think I'll have to rectify that omission. Soon. *g*
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Interesting, Lillian. I mainly do my historical research reading in the context of a current manuscript, or else when I'm browsing for a future idea/inspiration. That said, I have a couple of history books here than are waiting for me, and calling to me for no particular purpose at all. But fiction has always been my escape.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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Kay, I agree with you about the way some male authors view/portray women — it's a real turn-off. But I've found some good ones lately. I haven't read the Anna Huber series, but it keeps getting recommended so it won't be long, I suspect. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on Jaded Readers at Word Wenches
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