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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Delighted to see you here at the WordWenches, Marie. Mary Jo gushed to few of us a while back and forced (well, convinced) me to buy the first book in the series -- A Natural History of Dragons.I read it, loved it and have bought the next two.
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Thanks, Annette. I think the characters being open to each other, and having to work and compromise and learn in order to achieve their HEA -- as opposed to it happening with magical ease, is one of the things I enjoy in a romance.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Teresa -- I recently reread Persuasion, and each time I do, I like it more. I think being able to repair the mistakes of the past is such an appealing idea.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Kathy, that's so true -- whenever a non-romance person says to me, "But what's the point? You know from the first chapter that these two people are going to end up together." And I always say, it's the journey they take to reach that HEA that's the real story.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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You're right, Sue -- a lot of the early romances depended heavily on the hero being in the toils of an overly sophisticated, possibly mean, woman who clearly didn't deserve him. And the younger, more unsophisticated heroine who did. I think that's dropped out of favor these days -- maybe because it was overused for a while, and also maybe because it's an easy conflict -- blame it all on the other woman. I must say I sometimes got impatient with those heroes who were so clearly being led by the nose. *g* It's a very popular trope, still, I think.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Janga, I think you were one of the people who made me aware, early in my career, that though I wasn't deliberately writing to a theme, there were strong themes in my books, regardless. I love discussions of themes and tropes now -- I'm like a kid in a candy shop -- I want to write that one -- and that one, and ....
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Faith -- yes, I think that knee-jerk reaction is a good indication of the themes that speak to you most clearly. I can't resist a mail-order bride story, but have never written one because I don't write westerns. There might, I suppose be a possibility for Regency England -- I'll give it some thought. As for the childhood sweetheart/ one that got away theme, I have that for a book -in-waiting -- Maruc's sstory (from the Devil Riders series)
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Natalija, the May/December marriage used to be more popular, didn't it, but it seems to have fallen out of favor. I wouldn't be surprised, though, if it came back in, though with a different slant on it. I'm thinking of the French President, Emmanuel Macron, reversing the traditional May/December pairing. As for married couples working through their difficulties, I think that's a perennially popular theme, as well as a useful one. Very few marriages succeed by accident.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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I like that theme, too, Patricia -- there's an element of that in the book I'm writing at the moment. The hero actually says something like "Nobody is who they seem to be--nobody." (He's trying to warn the heroine off himself.) I think that was why Rothgar was such a hugely popular hero in the end -- all through the previous books, where he was all grim and autocratic and seemingly cold to the bone -- and all the while romance readers everywhere were aching for his redemption, for him to find the woman who would release the inner hero in him.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Laura, I also enjoy finding the turning point in character's lives. I can trace back several turning points in my own life, where I *know* with absolute certainty that my life changed in significant ways, and had that not moment not come, I would have been a different person. As well, it's a common fantasy isn't it, to be able to make a whole new start and live the kind of life you want to live. I never thought of it like that before I started writing — for me, the story and characters come first and the themes emerge.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Mary -- I think the books we keep and reread probably do contain themes that resonate deeply within us. I'm glad you reread my Nell and Harry -- it was a story that grabbed me by the throat and wouldn't let go. Thanks, too for the Marjorie Farrel recommendation -- I'll check it out.
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2017 on AAW — favorite themes at Word Wenches
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Anne here, and this month's "Ask-a-Wench" question is: Are there any particular subjects or themes that you often return to in your novels? We start with Mary Jo: Themes I return to over and over are reconciliation and second chances. I like characters who have faced great adversity, maybe even broken under the strain, yet manage to heal and become "stronger in the mended places." This covers my many tortured heroes, and a goodly number of tortured heroines as well. I suppose the most intense version that I've written is Kenzie Scott, the hero of my recently re-released contemporary novel,... Continue reading
Posted Jun 14, 2017 at Word Wenches
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I love my pots of peppermint. They provide me with delicious and refreshing mint tea -- dried or fresh, the leaves are better than anything you can buy. Mine sit on the front porch, and grow slowly through winter, but flourish best in the warmth, of course. I grow quite a few culinary herbs. And Joanna, I love the scent of lemon verbena, too
Toggle Commented Jun 13, 2017 on My Herbage at Word Wenches
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You mean that when two people kiss their clothes don't automatically start falling off them? And here was I thinking I must have been doing it alllll wrong. *g* I love the fact that authors can rerelease their old books, and that readers can get their hot little hands on them. (Mine especially.) In fact there are some authors whose earlier books are well out of print and who I occasionally wistfully think of stalking and persuading them to e-publish those titles. I'm currently rereading some old Elizabeth Cadell books that have been republished by her heirs. They're old fashioned-- written in the 60's-- but still retain some of the charm I found when I first came across my mother's copies as a teen.
Toggle Commented Jun 8, 2017 on Behind the E-Pubbing Curtain at Word Wenches
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When I was a kid, I never had a space to call my own -- it was always a shared bedroom, or a bedroom that belonged to an older sibling. For me, the outdoors provided my private space, under a big pine tree, where I built a "fort" of pine-needles, and the dog and I would hide there, or up in a tree — I was very fond of sitting in a tree -- the dog, not so much. Eventually I learned to build a private space inside my head. These days, of course, I have plenty of private space, but still, I can work almost anywhere. But, like Theo (above) I need my alone time.
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2017 on Personal Space at Word Wenches
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I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince -- and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig -- when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true -- maybe more so-- today. Here's his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons
Toggle Commented Jun 4, 2017 on The Fine Art of Regency Satire at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Karin. It sounds interesting. History has turned up a number of women who successfully passed themselves off as men for years at a time.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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Karin, have you read Julie Anne Long's recent contemporary books? I really enjoyed them. Now I want to go back and reread her historicals to compare the voice. I haven't yet read Elizabeth Essex -- might be time to try her. And CS Harris is always an excellent read. Have you read her historical romances that she wrote as Candice Proctor? Very good, too.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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Good luck in organizing your files and ebooks, Sue. A huge job, I suspect. I'm trying to cull a few books - soooo hard.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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Well done, Suzanne, for persisting! And how nice that they gave you a gift card.
Toggle Commented Jun 2, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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too, not to (sigh)
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Janice, so pleased you enjoyed my book. Thanks to for those other recommendations. I'm not up to date with the Reacher books, though I do enjoy them.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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I think youll really enjoy Michelles books, Emily -- and BTW, congratulations on your Desert Island Keeper Review from All About Romance. Also, your books keep popping up in readers comments on our Wenchly end-of-the-month What Were reading posts. *g*
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2017 on Meet Michelle Diener at Word Wenches
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Minna, the Bec McMaster "London Steampunk" books are so good, aren't they? I love the way she's reinterpreted "the ton" and linked it to vampirism -- so clever. Confession -- she's a friend of mine, BUT I was a fan of hers before I met her.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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Thanks for those recommendations, Vicki. I'm a fan of Jennifer Ashley, too -- I think my fave of hers is The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. And I haven't read that Joan Smith book, or the Jean Merrill -- muct chase them up.
Toggle Commented Jun 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in May at Word Wenches
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