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Anne Gracie
http://www.annegracie.com
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Liz it was also made into a film with Fred Astaire and (I think) Leslie Caron.
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I hope you enjoy it, Teresa. Would love to hear what you thought of it. The Darkest Hour was one of the first films I saw with my little writers' film group, and I really enjoyed it, and agree with you about Gary Oldman. I did a bit of research afterwards, because there were a few things we had doubts about -- in one incident my friend Carol and I turned to each other, she whispered "do you think that's true?" and we both shook our heads. LOL So I wanted to check which bits were fact and which were story-telling -- and we were right. But we agreed the story-telling bits might not have been strictly true, but they worked in the story.
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Kareni, I'm normally not a big movie-goer either, but this year I got together with a small group of writers and we go to movies together and talk about them afterwards. I've seen more movies in the last few months than I did in the last two years, and I have to say I'm loving it. I also saw Three Billboards, and feel much the same as you. I didn't like the violence, but also I was really disturbed how in the world of the movie everyone took it for granted. That policeman wasn't even punished for the "window incident" even though it happened in the main street and in front of his chief. He was stood down, but not charged. I hated that. And the end, where they were heading off to commit . . . ?? Wrong on so many counts, IMO.
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Thanks, Jenny — I haven't seen that one. I'll look out for it.
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Lynda, someone on FB said they thought it wasn't going to be released as a movie in the USA -- that it would go straight to netflicks. I think if that's true, it would be a terrible shame. The beauty of it alone cries out for a big screen. But there's no gunfights or car chases, so maybe that's what the movie people thing you all want. I don't know. I hope I'm wrong.
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It's lovely, isn't it? When I was a teen, I used to wear a beautiful old black coat that I found at a charity store — it was from the 1940's. I loved that coat, but one day when I wasn't paying attention my mum threw it out. She *hated* my preference for old-fashioned clothes.
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Annette, that's pretty much how I felt when I left the cinema. And then I had a good dose of joy all over again when I reread the book. So many little things I'd forgotten.
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Shelagh, the film has only just been released. I think you and your mother and sister will love it, and can I suggest I think your husband would too.
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Oh Liz, I loved 84 Charing Cross Road, and before that, when I was a teen I read my mother's copy of Daddy Long Legs and loved that, too. I think with a book written in letters you get a real sense of the personalties of the writers. Certainly in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society the various characters writing the letters come beautifully to life. I might have to reread 84 Charing Cross Road and Daddy Long Legs.
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Laura, that's exactly how it was with me. And so after loving the movie, I reread the book and enjoyed it all over again, without those conflicting 'buts.' Watch it — I think you'll love it.
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Rosemary I'm so glad you and your husband enjoyed it. A couple of those (wrong) reviewers implied that the movie was of a sort that only women could enjoy (and I could *hear* the sneer between the lines!) but there were a number of men in the audience I was part of and they seemed to enjoy it just as much. At the very end (I always wait for the credits to finish before moving) I was leaving and there was a gentleman sitting up the back on his own, and he looked at me and smiled in a silent "wasn't that wonderful" exchange that strangers sometimes do.
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Misti, some of the characters weren't quite as I'd envisaged them either, particularly Isola, but she was played by Katherine Parkinson who I think is wonderful, and she made the movie character Isola all her own and I loved her. Katherine Parkinson has been in lots of TV productions , but I first fell for her when she was the original receptionist for Doc Martin, and also when she played Jen in The IT Crowd. In this movie she played a slightly hippy-ish Isola who was funny and vulnerable and touching.
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Beverley, what a wonderful experience. Even though the movie wasn't filmed on Guernsey (for reasons I explained), it made me more determined to visit Guernsey. I've always wanted to visit the Channel Islands.
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Keira, no, it's a British film — with half the cast (slight exaggeration) of Downton Abbey and other great British TV series. The heroine is played by Lily James (Downton) and the hero is Michiel Huisman (pronounced Mikeel Housman) from Game of Thrones.
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Anna-Lisa, guess what? I bought the first of that series last night. In preparation for this blog, I did a bit of research and came across the name and thought I'd have a look. It has lots of amazon reviews, which is usually a sign of a good book, so I bought book 1. *g*
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Thanks, Sharon, I hope you get to see the movie soon. It's a different-but-the-same experience.
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Malvina, I did exactly the same — it's one of those books, destined to be a classic. I'm so glad I didn't reread it beforehand — it leaves you free to enjoy the movie. Wasn't it wonderful? So lovely that you've seen it — so few have, yet, but I'm waiting for more to join in. I've already spoken to my little film/writers group about organizing a date to go. I'm very happy to see it again.
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Jay, I've had friends who lived up your way and when they hit the city it was a perfect feast of the senses — food, music, movies, the lot. I'm sure you'll enjoy the movie. Thanks for joining in the word wenches' conversation.
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Yesterday I went to see the movie of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. I'd read the book, and loved it, but that was quite a few years ago. The movie was sort of a preview, a special deal offered by my movie club, and since it was on in a cinema in the city, over the road from where I had an appointment with my dentist an hour later, I decided to take the morning off and watch it. I really enjoyed it. I came out of the cinema with a smile on my face, along with... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Word Wenches
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Janice, Australians are used to having to travel, and that year my first book was a RITA finalist, which was a pretty big deal for me, so I really wanted to go. These days so many of my friends are in the US that traveling to a conference is as much about catching up with friends as it is for my career. *g*
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2018 on So You Want to be a Writer? at Word Wenches
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And Janice, you've also supported many a writer with your reading and your encouragement and appreciation — I'm speaking personally here. I remember meeting you and a bunch of Georgette Heyer fans in LA when I was a brand new writer with one book just out in the UK. I was on my way to my first RWA conference (in Washington DC). You guys made me feel like an author even though my book hadn't been out yet in the US or Australia.
Toggle Commented Apr 14, 2018 on So You Want to be a Writer? at Word Wenches
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Hi Janet, thanks for commenting. I grew up on Heyer and love her books, but unfortunately it's a commercial necessity in romance publishing these days to open the bed room door. Some years back (before e-publishing became big) a number of my favorite historical romance authors lost their contracts, and most of the sweet (ie no sex) lines were closed. That's the reality. I try to ensure that any lovemaking scenes in my books are relevant to the particular characters and development of their romance. As a result, some books are more sensual than others. I know not all readers like to see sex on the page, but I also get complaints from some readers that some of my books are not sexy enough. We can't please everyone.
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2018 on An Impossible Quiz at Word Wenches
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Anne, I'm so glad your family is reuniting. Wills and inheritances can be so divisive and cause such bitterness. I'm so glad the next generation is healing the rift. Well done.
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Jane what a fabulous trio of aunts. My godmother/aunt put me on the handicraft track when I was a kid. Her hands were always busy, and she made wonderful things that she sold to raise money for charity.
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Le puff, le pant — I'm trying. But the stories percolate at their own pace. And truly, Andrea, action is so much easier to write. *g*
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