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rose webb
Sydney
Trade unionist, historian, politics scholar, justice activist, optimist.
Recent Activity
An interim post while I finish reading Paul Preston's 'We saw Spain die' (what an extraordinary title). Preston offers yet another passionate perspective on the war, and one which, because of its narrative style drawing on the experiences of journalists who covered the war from inside Spain, will attract not... Continue reading
Posted Jun 21, 2014 at The world as a book
Hosted by friendly owners of the Meadows Cafe, at 235 Kentish Town Road, London NW5 2JT (it's next door to the Santander Bank), I have mounted a display of prints of some of my recent black and white landscape photographs. (Nothing to do with work - this is sheer fun!)... Continue reading
Reblogged Feb 1, 2014 at The world as a book
Yesterday I at last ended reading CJ Sansom's Winter in Madrid. It was a hard read. I'd expected a wartime detecting narrative - yes, set in the awfulness of Franco's Spain - but less cutting to the bone, less informed on Civil War dynamics than this. Even, perhaps, less perceptive... Continue reading
Posted Jan 28, 2014 at The world as a book
In Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August (1962): "In the month of August 1914 there was something looming, inescapable, universal that involved us all. Something in that awful gulf between perfect plans and fallible men that makes one tremble with a sense of 'There but for the Grace of God... Continue reading
Posted Aug 28, 2013 at The world as a book
Seaumus Milne in today's UK Guardian (28.8.13) quite rightly attacks the coming together of nations who formed Bush's coalition of the willing, this time ramping up their collusion to intervene in Syria. (Here's his article: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/27/attack-syria-chemical-weapon-escalate-backlash ). Milne reminds how we have all been here before, even down to the line on chemical weapons, the use of which is still denied by the regime (and inarguably a massive crime against civilians has taken place, with perpetrators). There's substance to this 'being here before' - even, we see the UN being sidelined as with the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The difference... Continue reading
The city; urban transport, a slight fug to the sky so that nothing takes a sharp edge. The park late afternoon crowded with dogs, their adult companions, all sitting in chat circles or circling, chasing. Not the ambling streaking ballthrowing beach wiggling of my northern sand-walking homes. That was February... Continue reading
Posted Apr 21, 2013 at The world as a book
Post bombardment reflections on Gaza, Israel, and displacement. [This post was written November 2012 pending the cease-fire and augmented early January.] The mid-November outrages. 80 died in Gaza, 3 in Israel. Did you see the photograph of the Dalou children, dead? It would stop your heart, if nothing else has. In Israel the glossy lively Tel Aviv, thought to be somehow immune, was battered. A friend visited there in 2011, partied in the bars. It was just after the release of Gilad Shilat. Like many liberal Jews, her hosts were outraged by oppression of Palestine. In Gaza - the territory's... Continue reading
A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century by Barbara W. Tuchman (1978) 1987 by Ballantine Books. Watching the crushing, increasingly terrible trauma being inflicted this week on the people of Palestine, Syria and yes, Israel, I've been thinking about its genesis in time and colonialism. And about how a 20thC... Continue reading
Posted Nov 24, 2012 at The world as a book
rose webb is now following Web Editor
Nov 23, 2012
rose webb is now following John F. Ptak
Nov 23, 2012
rose webb is now following Fammy Sorrester
Nov 23, 2012
Nov 23, 2012
The United Nations Audiovisual Library of International Law was first proposed by the Codification Division of the Office of Legal Affairs and approved by the General Assembly as an activity under the Programme of Assistance in the Teaching, Study, Dissemination and Wider Appreciation of International Law in 1997 (resolution 52/152). The Audiovisual Library was initially created to serve as a lending library of audio and video cassette tapes for educational and government institutions in developing countries. The Audiovisual Library, as originally conceived, encountered insurmountable practical difficulties. In response to the dramatic increase in requests for international law training beginning in... Continue reading
James Hathaway on the legality of offshore processing via www.abc.net.au Finalising my article about state's failures on asylum-seeking and refugee policy and I've just listened again to this interview. Geraldine Doogue interviewed James Hathaway in September this year on Labor's 'Pacific Solution Mark 2'. Intriguing and compassionate argument from Hathaway and a quite different take on people-smugglers. I think that take must be noted: extended, recall that the people-smuggler follows a long tradition of helping displaced persons escape persecution. Historically and in other contexts (WW2, Cold War Berlin for example) the role has been heroic. Sure the role is also... Continue reading
Bernie was stubborn, passionate and a working-class hero. He was elevated to iconic status, but only because he was willing to take on corporate greed until his last breath. He was bold, funny, exciting and wasn’t afraid of a challenge. The media just happened to find someone that was lost in life, and Bernie found his calling and relished that. He was a man diagnosed with a horrible condition and who just didn’t want to go quietly. He wanted to rattle the cage; wanted everyone to know he was suffering and that others were suffering. via blogs.abc.net.au Trade unions, social... Continue reading
Turkish-Italian archaeological team explores site in the city of Karkemish on Syria-Turkey border. This link via John Hopper's wonderful The Textile Blog. Reminds me of William Dalrymple's description -in From Holy Mountain - of Turkish destruction in that eastern border region, over years, of Armenian churches: exquisite heritage plundered or... Continue reading
Posted Nov 9, 2012 at The world as a book
I was amused by this Tor piece: most citizens of the Star Wars galaxy are probably totally illiterate. And then life imitated art: Amazon ate Audible, that is. A while back, Amazon acquired Audible (the audiobook store) and now they have added a whispersync for voice service which, I confess,... Continue reading
Reblogged Oct 14, 2012 at The world as a book
rose webb is now following clare
Oct 12, 2012
Yesterday marked the 10th anniversary of the first Bali bombing; 202 people dying terribly while travelling, enjoying their tribes, or working - simply earning a living in the Kuta nightclubs. People of nations, including the people of Bali. I often think of the father who eventually found his 16 yr... Continue reading
Posted Oct 12, 2012 at The world as a book
'After the Cold War Eric Hobsbawm remembers Tony Judt' in London Review of Books LRB, 26 April 2012. An interesting long essay mainly on Judt; it illustrates the depths of Hobsbawm's critical insight and his extraordinary capacity for compassionate, uncompromised, analysis. http://www.lrb.co.uk/v34/n08/eric-hobsbawm/after-the-cold-war Clipping: "My relations with Tony Judt date back... Continue reading
Posted Oct 10, 2012 at The world as a book
Eric Hobsbawm, Marxist historian, died a week ago, on Monday 1 October in London. He was 95. Many, many words have been written since by a host of people, by no means all historians, who are made bereft by his passing. (This is The Guardian obituary from Martin Kettle and... Continue reading
Posted Oct 10, 2012 at The world as a book
A terrible massacre yesterday at the Lonmin Marikana platinum plant (and acknowledging that this comes after a week of utter violence at the plant, machetes, including between workers; is not unprecedented in global historical terms; and that police have also died): but am shocked speechless by this event, as must be trade unionists everywhere, and certainly as is South Africa, hurting again. Is it worth noting that Lonmin is a ftse100 company, with all that this implies in a country lacking leadership right now? Take a look at the Twitter feed hastag Lonmin for the local disbelief, grief, and the... Continue reading
London is a town on a series of visible ‘ups’ right now – the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations, the Olympics imminent, the annual tennis festival Wimbledon; the town bubbles away in a soup of international visitors and media hype. But less visible ‘downs’ lurk. Last year’s riots are still puzzled over,... Continue reading
Reblogged Jul 7, 2012 at The world as a book
London is a town on a series of visible ‘ups’ right now – the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations, the Olympics imminent, the annual tennis festival Wimbledon; the town bubbles away in an intriguing soup of international visitors and media hype. But less visible ‘downs’ lurk. Last year’s riots are still puzzled over, as though they were a puzzle and not an inexorable, rippling, shocking outcome of deep social frustration and fragmentation. The rest of the country observes the partying, unsure how to approach the shenanigans – to share vicariously, or to resent. London geographer, scholar and activist Doreen Massey (World City,... Continue reading
Am now back in the UK which has Council/ Borough elections next week, and am about to travel to Paris, serendipitously in the countdown week to final round Presidential election ballot. Last week I was in Scotland at the European Social Science History Conference in Glasgow: Scotland certainly seemed to be gearing up to a Labour resurgence in the election: am now in London where the real contest is Ken Livingstone and Boris Johnson. Johnson will doubtless win but it’s an intriguing match: was at a dinner party the other night where the debate was of Johnson cycling in his... Continue reading