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David Brock
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David Brock is now following Mills & Reeve
Jun 1, 2010
Thanks Denis. I have sent you an email about this. David
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I have found the answer to the question when do comments have to be in on the Ports NPS for the Select Committee to take them into account. It is 15th January as for the Energy NPSs. The NPS will be considered by the Transport Select Committee which issued a call for evidence on 10th November - there's a link below to the press release. http://www.parliament.uk/parliamentary_committees/transport_committee/transpn091110.cfm
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I agree. This one of a number of very good arguments for transitional provisions. Another is the position where a planning application has been appealed, a section 106 agreement signed but the applicant is waiting the grant of permission. The planning package will be based on current viability and circular 5/05. But once permission is granted the permission will be subject to CIL if it has reserved matters and a chargng schedule is brought into effect before development commences. That also applies where a planning authority grants permission, but at least there you know what the timeframe is - you have your permission. In the appeal scenario, there will have been a huge investment with no guarantee of when the permission wil emerge.
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The longlist of architects chosen to redesign the Chelsea Barracks Scheme was announced yesterday and this article in the Guardian today www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/aug/12/chelsea-architecture-qatar-london makes interesting reading. Five of the ten firms are said to be closely allied to the Prince's approach, and they include the designers of Seaside, the town which was the setting for The Truman Show movie and two firms which have worked on the Princes's development at Poundbury. This is the problem with the Prince's public statements on architecture. Who can blame a developer for seeking firms who are less likely to cause the Prince to criticise the development and prejudice the grant of planning permission? After all a developer is quite properly trying to make a profit. So why make your life more difficult with a scheme which is being criticised by the Prince? It will be interesting to see what sort of architects make it to the short list. Two allied to the Prince's approach and one of the rest? Any other suggestions?
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