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Cara Elliott/Andrea Pickens
historical romance author
Recent Activity
Such a lovely thought, and so true, PJ. Thank you for sharing it.
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Thank you, Mary Jo for the beautiful post. Andrea/Cara, waving to Jo wherever the next stop on the journey has taken her.
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Oh, I love that too!
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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Thank you, everyone for sharing your thoughts about Jo. I can't begin to express how much all of us Wenches will miss out dear friend. But a great source of solace is that she'll continue to give inspiration and joy to so many people through her wonderful books.
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on In Memoriam: Jo Beverley at Word Wenches
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Amen to the I love reading, Teresa! From early childhood on. I always had my nose in a book. And they are still a source of wonder and joy.
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I did too. And yes, one can learn wonderful history through novels. For example, Bernard Cornwell's Richard Sharpe book on the battle of Waterloo is extremely accurate.
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I agree. I like using real people as "color" but prefer the freedom of developing characters,which is much harder to do if you use real people. Too constricting !
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I very much enjoyed the early books in the Temerarie series too, and thought Novak did a very good job at blending real history with her fantasy world.
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Sue, you're in for a treat! Tracy's series really is wonderful. And the real life characters are done very well—they truly work within the story
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VERY cool! Metternich really was quite a character. So complex, but also a little endearing in how he wore his heart on his sleeve.
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Talleyrand and Metternich are fascinating people. Through research I did on the Congress of Vienna, I found so many fascinating real-life people that make perfect secondary characters in historical fiction. Tsar Alexander is another one. And yes—Tracy does a marvelous job of bringing the people and the era to life, doesn't she!
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A really good question, Lillian. I'm the same way, but I've learned it's better to give a basic background of the real people even if you think it's obvious. Not everyone is a history nerd like all of us! But then, of course, there's a fine line between doing an info dump and having the facts come out naturally. Writing is always a challenge!
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Andrea/Cara here, As most of our readers know, I'm a big fan of historical mysteries, and the Regency-set series by Tracy Grant featuring Malcolm and Suzanne Rannoch is one of my favorites. So I'm delighted to welcome Tracy back to the Word Wenches to tell us a little about her love of history and how she weaves it into her intricate plots. Like the Wenches, Tracy loves research and is an expert on the people and places that makes the Regency such a fascinating era. From the cloak and dagger spy intrigues of the Napoleonic Wars to the details of... Continue reading
Posted May 17, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Wonderful blog, Christina and Nicola—and on a fascinating topic that definitely needs explanation! Christina—can't wait to read the book! xoxo
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Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged! Love your historical examples, too. I think it's so true that writing down a "To Do" list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5" x&', and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.
Toggle Commented May 5, 2016 on Bullet Journals at Word Wenches
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Yes, just listened too. It was really terrific!
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Just listened to it, Shannon. Really wonderful! Thanks again!
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Thanks SO much for sharing,Shannon! Am dashing off to watch it right now!
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Ha—make it look effortless is right! It's a huge amount of work to maintain a garden. I know a lot of people find it relaxing, but I start getting antsy to be back at my desk writing. I love the results of gardening, but just don't have the temperament for it. LOL at your perfectionist friend! Nature is not made for perfection—or rather perfect symettry.
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I'll sign up for that! And yes, Shannon—please report back if there's a podcast!
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Oh,lucky you Shannon! I visited Stoke Park, outside of London, which has sections designed by Capability Brown.It was wonderful to see the vistas. What a great story about finding the sketches, and now having the chance to recreate the design. It makes you wonder about all the hidden treasures, like manuscripts and painting and prints, that are still in drawers and attics!
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Central Park has some lovely areas! And you're so right—gardening takes a LOT of time and work. I realized pretty quickly that it's a hard passion to have on top of writing, and besides, I just didn't have the patience for it. I have some nice planters . .. but that's the extent of my green thumb!
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Sue, the Romantic movement had a huge influence on English garden design. A return to Nature—or a carefully cultivated appearance of wildness—became the model. And less formal strictures appealed to the new individualism. I'm like you—I'd much rather spend time in a place that feels natural, even though it may have been created by an architect. That's not to say I don't admire formal layouts, but I just respond more emotionally to a less cultivated look.
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So true. I'm of the cozy and casual school. Parterres do not encourage you to take off your shoes and laze in the grass reading a good book. And that's my idea of a great way to hang out in a garden. I love the natural look, and a certain wildness, which I find relaxing.
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“With large sweeping expanses of lush green fields, groupings of trees, winding paths, and serpentine-shaped rivers and lakes, the English landscape appears as an ideal form of nature; it is, however, an expertly crafted construct.” —from the exhibit, "Moving Earth" Andrea/Cara here, Spring is bursting into bloom where I am, the colors and textures transforming the stark planes of winter into a whole new landscape. It got me to thinking about how trees and shrubs and flowers shape our perception of our surroundings. Modern life, with all its crowded cities and endless strip malls, has tended to dull that bond... Continue reading
Posted May 1, 2016 at Word Wenches
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