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Andrea Penrose/Andrea Pickens/Cara Elliott
historical romance author
Recent Activity
Wonderful post, Susan. I'm in awe you could answer your own questions. Don't make me choose between my books! But okay, the desert island. Here I'm going to cheat! The complete set of Harry Potter, the complete set of Mary Stewart romantic suspense (The Moonspinners is among my all time favorites, for the exact reasons you mentioned) the complete novels of Jane Austen. For nonfiction, The Birth of the Modern by Paul Johnson, all of Richard Holmes's delightful histories, and a whole bunch of art books—Turner, Delacroix, Cezanne, Picasso , . ..um, I may need two islands!
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Too Fond of Books at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, ha! As it happens, a good friend of mine wrote the screenplay for Mystic Pizza! It's a fun movie–but yes, put sleepy little Mystic, an old seaport town , on the tourist map. (It was also Julia Roberts's first movie!)
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on New England Islands at Word Wenches
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Well, as I said, you just have to come back soon. (Hint, hint: Connecticut has LOTS of wonderful history, and some charming coastlines and quaint New England towns! I'm just saying . . .)
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on New England Islands at Word Wenches
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A wonderful post, Mary Jo. This is my neck of the woods, and I can second your nice words on the charms and history of this part of New England. Block Island is a wonderful, low-key place, and mainland Rhode Island has so many historic places to explore. The nooks and crannies of the coat have many small charming towns that make poking around so much fun. So sorry you didn't get to Nantucket, which is amazingly beautiful—and the whaling museum there is fascinating, as you can imagine, as the island was one of the great whaling ports of of the country. I think you need to come back in better weather!
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on New England Islands at Word Wenches
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An absolutely fascinating post, Joanna! You now have me thinking of how to work in a porcelain element to my Regency mysteries!) Like Mary Jo, I'm more of a stoneware aficionado, though I do have my grandmother's lovely formal floral-painted china, which gets trotted out on special occasions.
Toggle Commented Sep 13, 2018 on Pretty, Pretty Porcelain at Word Wenches
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Oh, where is that, Annette? Yes, I admit you have some decent pizza there. But I'm not a big fan of deep dish. I love the New Haven crust, which is thin enough not to be doughy, still still chewy, rather than really crisp like a cracker, which I find to be the case with some very thin crust pizzas.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Oh, no on the tomato sensitivity!I have another friend to whom that happened in adulthood. Perhaps it has something to do with being in the nightshade family, which has plants toxic to humans within its family. In any case, so sorry you can't enjoy pizza anymore (anyone want to fight over the extra slice, ha, ha, ha!)
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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I am ALWAYS willing to try a new pizza place, and these sound great! Thanks for sharing, Patricia!
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Janice, Trenton is considered a pizza heaven so I'm sure your local spot is a worthy match for Peps's. Hmm, maybe we need to do some taste tastes!
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Ah!A non-pizza person! You should wear that badge proudly! I've never had a McDonald's hamburger(it's now became a point of honor not to try one.) People are always flabbergasted when I mention it. But I dislike fast food like that, and the idea of the burgers always made me queasy. So I just decided I wouldn't ever do it.
Toggle Commented Sep 11, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Chocolate and pizza—the two essential food groups, IMO! (Hey, tomatoes are healthy!) Like the purists, my favorite is a margherita topping, and maybe added mushrooms. I'm not a fan of sausage or pepperoni (I concede I'm in the minority.) And definitely no pineapple!
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Oh, Binnie—what a deprived early childhood! I'm glad you're making up for it, ha, ha, ha. I'm not sure what it is about pizza, but along with chocolate, it must be one of the most popular comfort foods in the world. (It's cold and rainy here, and I'm thinking of lunch . . . Hmmm.I wonder if I have mozzarella!)
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2018 on A tasty slice of culinary history at Word Wenches
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Andrea/Cara here, feeling in a pizza state of mind today. (There is a reason for this, but honestly, does one really have to a have a specific reason? I mean, who doesn’t like pizza?) I’ve been spending time in New Haven, Connecticut recently, as I mentor freshmen students as they arrive for their first semester at college. I find it really rewarding to help students navigate such a huge change in life as they begin to decide on courses, extracurricular activities, and just how to adjust to roommates and living away from home. And I love the intellectual energy and... Continue reading
Posted Sep 9, 2018 at Word Wenches
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STOP! (Ha, ha, ha—no, of course don't!) Your lists are always so interesting! Madly scribbling notes!
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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Oh, Vicki . . .this monthly column is always SUCH a danger to my TBR pile (as if it needs more!) What a fabulous list. I've read about the Bell book and it sounds fascinating. Will definitely put that high on the list.
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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The power of words . . . what a poignant story. Thank you for sharing.
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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Karin, so glad to hear you like Thomas Perry. I very much enjoyed The Burglar, and will definitely try more of his books. The ones you n mention sound very intriguing! The spy one and the pirate sound great as well! I love discovering new reads through our readers!
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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E-books for old, out-of-print books are so wonderful! I've found a number of titles for books I've lost over the years and it's great to have them back in my (digital) library.
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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What a fabulous list, Quantum! The classics like Sayers will be such fun to revisit. I've been meaning to read Wild, and now will nudge it up on my list, especially after just hiking in Switzerland. It s an activity very conducive to reflection. And your in for a treat with my fellow Wench titles! (And I'm very honored to be mentioned, too!)
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2018 on What We're Reading: August at Word Wenches
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Such a fun post, Pat. There's NEVER enough time to explore all the history in a city! Your pictures give such a great feeling of dark stone—intimidating, and probably even moreso in the dead of winter. Scottish winters were likely not filled with sweetness and light. I've been to Scotland several times, but never have made it to Edinburgh. It's also got a great art heritage, so I really want to get there soon.
Toggle Commented Aug 30, 2018 on Visiting Edinburgh at Word Wenches
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Thanks, for sharing, Karin. Walking is a wonderful way to look and see. It triggers all the good parts of our brain—it's calming and restorative, and the physical exercise adds to a sense of well-being.
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Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.
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So glad you enjoyed the post, Maryellen.There are days when I get so wrapped up in work that I almost forget to get outside. But I do think it's really important to take a walk and smell the orses!
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Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too. It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me. Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I've played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators. I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps. I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!
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Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you're never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it. Mark Twain called golf "a good walk spoiled"! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don't take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.
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