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Cara Elliott/Andrea Pickens
historical romance author
Recent Activity
Ha, ha! I know what you mean—it's nice to have some reward for one's efforts! And fly fishing is work! I really enjoy hiking—and just walking and looking at all the interesting things around me.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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That's truly the beauty of reading—the world is infinitely large and infinitely intriguing. It's hard when physical limitations keep us from doing all that we'd like, but thank goodness that books can take us wherever we want to go.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha! I'll bet they are veen more delicious than you remember! Locally-sourced sea salt on hard-boiled eggs—you were a hip foodie before there were hip foodies!
Toggle Commented yesterday on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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I love watching surfcasting! I'll bet it was a wonderful experience to share with your grandfather. And LOVE the info about hard-boiled eggs. How fun! Will have to try that!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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Mary, T. I think love of reading is one of the greatest gifts anyone can have. It allows you travel to wondrous places and times, and explore so many facets of emotions and feelings. Losing yourself in a story is relaxing, it's inspiring . . .and so many more adjectives! I never got hooked on fishing w either, though I've enjoyed a few afternoons of casting. My brothers and I went backpacking in Wyoming and we caught trout high in the mountains (They cleaned them!)And yes, they were incredibly tasty grilled over the fire!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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Hiking is a great favorite of mine too. I find it very relaxing to walk and take in all the beauty of Nature.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Go Fish! at Word Wenches
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Andrea/Cara here, Where I live, the month of August is the epitome of the slow-paced languor of summer. It’s usually hot, which inspires outdoor thoughts of cool water, refreshing breezes and leafy shade, not to speak of lazy movements . . . or sitting and moving as little as possible! Which got me to thinking about Regency leisure pursuits. Along with hunting and riding, fly-fishing is one of the most popular pasttimes depicted in paintings of the era. And when I decided to do a little research into the subject, I quickly discovered that Great Britain has a long been... Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Word Wenches
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Pat, the book I mentioned in the last WWR (Eye of the Beholder) focuses (no pun intended!) on Leeuwenhoek and his microscopes. According to the author's research, they were pretty darn good! He made his own lenses, and experimented with optics, and made some revolutionary improvements. It might be worth a read! And BTW, I love the idea of a scientific hero! Far more interesting than a gambling lout!
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2016 on Scientific Magic at Word Wenches
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Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation. I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers. I'm sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it's usually men who write history. It's wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.
Toggle Commented Aug 10, 2016 on Woman of Mystery at Word Wenches
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LOL, Anne. I'm a horrible typist too, and early on wrote my manuscripts by hand. They look like Rube Goldberg diagrams, with crisscrossing arrows, elaborate letters—A goes here, B goes on the next page , , ,it needed a decoding ring to figure out! Computers area godsend. I, too, fiddle and fuss, constantly changing paragraphs. Which is why I'm a slow writer. I'm not big on re-reading my books either. I ALWAYS see why to do something better, and cringe, thinking, "why didn't I say it THIS way, not THAT way," Sigh.
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Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down. As for seafaring books, Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendship—and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O'Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2016 on Men and the Sea at Word Wenches
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Yes, a new day often brings new ways to solve aplot problem!
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Absolutely—you have to find a solution that works for you. There's always a way to solve a problem. Good luck with finding the way that resonates with you.
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Joanna, that' so wise. I sould do more of that, if only because it's interesting to go back and see earlier tries. I do save sections if I start to heavily rework them. But sometimes the small details are good to see. (My external drive in Time Machine does allow me to go back months and see earlier drafts, though I don't do it much.)
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Nancy, I think we all struggle with when to "stop". Every time I re-read a manuscript I see things that can be changed. It's not easy to decide when enough is enough—but sometimes the endless fiddling takes some of the initial life and energy a out of the story. So you do have to train yourself to say, "okay, time to go on to the next project." Keep in mind nothing is ever perfect. And that's okay.
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Oana-Maria, As you are discovering, online resources are not always the most accurate. But also, remember you are writing fiction! You need not try to be exactly accurate unless you are trying to write an accurate story about a specific person. Many of us are inspired by real life stories, but then use them to write fiction, making up our own characters. That way you can write the story you want!
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Hmm, this sounds like it's going to be a VERY interesting book!
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Ha, ha, ha! You're very au courant in knowing how to draw it!
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So true, Lillian. In graphic design at grad school, they made use draw letterforms by hand—and they had to be perfect! I swear, I worked on the letter "a" for a month. But it does teach you to appreciate the nuances of form. It's a very good exercise.
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Oooo, very intriguing!
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Wonderful! Sounds fascinating.
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Oana-Maria, I don't think any projects are too ambitious if you're writing from the heart. Writing is challenging, but I understand exactly what you mean about giving you an inner equilibrium. I think all of us write because . . .well, because we can't imagine not writing! All your projects sound fascinating. I have to stay, I'm very intrigued by the Wallachian princess. The time and setting sound fascinating. Good luck with all of them!
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Sue, with your copy editor training, I'll bet your pages are way cleaner than mine! I swear, one sentence takes me a notebook page to get right. It's not a pretty sight! Your genealogy project sounds wonderful, and I'm sure you'll do a fabulous job. And I don't buy for a second that you can't write fiction! Your posts are always beautifully written, and you're such a avid reader that I can't imagine you don't have story ideas swirling inside your head. It's never too late to try!
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Oh, LOL on reading one's own handwriting. That's another reason I'm reluctant to trust myself with pen and paper. And yes, isn't it fun to see even Jane crossed out and reworked her prose. I'd really love to see the original of P&P—but as you say, sitting down to a cup of tea and talking writing would be far more amazing. Perhaps there is a Gunter's somewhere in the cosmos reserved for writers and readers!
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LOL on the family packrats. How fortunate, and fun to have! I love the idea of writing by hand, but like you, I do so much fussing with paragraphs as I write that a computer is a godsend. However, I do think the studies are right, and the brain processes things a little different when one actually uses a pen, so am trying to experiment by doing short sections with paper and pen.
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