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Cara Elliott/Andrea Penrose
historical romance author
Recent Activity
So glad you enjoyed the post, Sue. History has such endlessly fun arcane facts, doesn't it! Gardening is a rigorous as a sport—lots of physical skills required in the bending, carrying, digging! So you definitely can call yourself a summer athlete!
Toggle Commented 11 hours ago on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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HJ, Yes, I think in the E.M. Foster era, tennis became synonymous for aristocratic English country weekends . . . lazy days, beautiful people. It was one of the few sports ladies and gentlemen could play together, and I think that social aspect of it is part of its cachet.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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Anne, it's really worth a visit. There's a wonderful sense of history and tradition when you walk the grounds. And the museum gives a fascinating history of the game. It's very interesting and enjoyable, even if you aren't a player or sports fan
Toggle Commented yesterday on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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Linda, it's my favorite tournament to watch. I love that the players have to wear classic white—they look so much more elegant, IMO.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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Bona, lazing on the beach is a GREAT summer sport? I'll come join you for "doubles!" LOL!
Toggle Commented yesterday on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, ha! Anyone who can say it three times fast deserves a bottle of champagne to go along with the g and ts! Henry VIII was an avid player and his tennis court was at the end of St. Jame's Street, right where Berry Brother and Rudd wine shop is. There are also references to tennis in Shakespeare. Strawberries and cream are an iconic part of Wimbledon, along with the ivy and sound of the skidding balls across the grass. (I was VERY disappointed when they changed from white balls to the modern optic yellow, though.)
Toggle Commented yesterday on Tennis, Anyone? at Word Wenches
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Cara/Andrea here, and as I'm a little under the gun with deadlines and guest, I am invoking the Wench Panic Rule, which allows us to post an oldie but goodie . . . so without further ado . . . Wimbledon is in full swing this weekend on the verdant grass courts of the All England Club.. It’s one of the “Grand Slam” events, a quartet of tournaments that are the crown jewels of the sport’s elite competitions. (Remember, I warned you all that I am the resident “jock” of the Wenches.) As it’s one of the grand traditions of... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Word Wenches
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Jennie, I remember reading that when I was very young too—and still love that sort of gothic romantic suspense! And of course Mary Stewart! Seems we are all big fans of Nine Coaches waiting!
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Yes, you do!
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Love Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt's gothics. A governess works so well in romantic suspense.
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Wonderful list, Janga! Adore Nine Coaches Waiting too, and Jane Eyre was one of my first romance books, so has always been special to me! You will love The Mayfair Affair.
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Liette, I am sure you will love Tracy's books!
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If you like suspense and intrigue, you will love The Mayfair Affair, Juanita!
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Excellent trope plot, Connie! I look forward to your book!
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Laura, Jane Eyre was one of my first romance books, so it has a very special place in my heart. I think that's why I always love the governess trope. And love Heyer's The Nonesuch too!
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Cara/Andrea, Today I'm delighted to welcome back my good friend Tracy Grant, who has come to give us a little historical backstory to the latest book in her marvelous Susanna and Malcolm Rannoch historical mystery series. For those of you who have not yet read Tracy's books, well, you're in for a treat! Set in the late Regency, they feature wonderfully nuanced, complex stories involving the world of espionage—where personal and professional loyalties are often tangled, and moral choices test the concepts of love, family and friendship. Her characters are beautifully rendered and her research of all aspects of the... Continue reading
Posted Jun 21, 2015 at Word Wenches
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No, no--thank YOU! I'm an avid reader, and get such pleasure out of good books!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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I feel far busier than I was in my twenties, and not just because of the internet, etc. I just keep finding more and more things I want to do! How cool about the app! Thanks for the heads-up!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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You're an inspiration, Sue! I think curiosity and a love learning is a Fountain of Youth . . . or, more elementally, the secret to a full, engaged life. Yes, I know about van Gogh, so maybe eye problems are influential in art.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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Jo, I think it's very true that in some ways as we get older we feel freeer to explore.Maybe we are wiser and have learned to feel less constrained by convention! That's a VERY interesting point about eyesight. I hadn't heard anything about Turner suffering from visual problems . . .Perhaps. Buy the sheer abstractness to me seems very deliberate, and an evolution of his style of playing with light. I'd prefer to believe it was artistic choice, not medical necessity!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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Oh, I love this, too, Patricia. It's a wonderful way of viewing things—and so true.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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Thanks for sharing these, Artemisia! So VERY true!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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The movie has just come out on DVD, and though it may lose something on the small screen, it still will be wonderful. Sometimes, what with one's responsibilities, Life's path may take a little longer to get to where one can "throw the switch" on creative endeavors. So I totally agree—age makes no difference. One should just go for doing what one is passionate about (and BTW, your books are wonderful, so thank goodness you never let go of your dreams!)
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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So true, Madge. I think whne one is creative in any field, it keeps one thinking, exploring and challenging oneself. Which IMO is all good!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2015 on The Age of Creativity at Word Wenches
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Cara/Andrea here, musing on creativity . . . and, well, the A-word. Ah-ha! (No, it’s not Ah) now that I have your Attention, I shall explain. But first, a bit of backstory. I am excited about an upcoming lecture I’m going to attend in a week on the painter J. M. W. Turner. Mike Leigh, the director of the movie, Mr. Turner, will be discussing the making of the film and the artist, who is credited not only with being one of the great luminaries of the Romantic era, but also with being one of the pioneers of modern art.... Continue reading
Posted Jun 7, 2015 at Word Wenches
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