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Cara Elliott/Andrea Penrose
historical romance author
Recent Activity
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Cara/Andrea here, apologizing for still moaning and groaning about the stresses of my impending move. it's been a rough couple of months as I have been both selling my old place and buying a new one. The purchase went smooth a a Regency silk gown (and it fits just as nicely—I love it and can't wait to get my stuff—much culled down— settled there later this week. Alas, the seling part hashad more than enough stresses for both transactions. The buyer is, to be polite, the Buyer from Hell. And so, I am invoking the Wench Rule of posting an... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
Yes, I am. Not easy at times—especially at conferences, when people start calling multiple names. I have enough trouble remembering my REAL name. LOL.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Interview with Emma Campion! at Word Wenches
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Wonderful interview, Emma/Candace and Susan. Emma, I'm very unfamiliar with this period of history but you make it sound so fascinating! Can't wait to read A Triple Knot! And as a huge fan of historical mysteries, your Candace Robb titles have just gone on the TBR pile too. Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches!
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Interview with Emma Campion! at Word Wenches
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Butter and regional raw honey, AJ! How divine that sounds on fresh baked biscuits! May I come over?
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Karim I've recently switched to loose tea, and have found a wonderful Earl Grey mix that is very nice. But your addition of spearmint leaves sounds wonderful. Will have to experiment. And the book . . . yes. A good book is just as good as chocolate!
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Glenda. This is the most stressful thing I've EVER done. Not planning on moving again anytime soon!Borwnies with walnuts sounds really good about now, Have spent the last five hours sorting through clothe that were stored in the attic. What was I thinking!!!!
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Donna, that sounds fab. And yes, I know logically that sugar is NOT a good choice, But for me, sometimes it works
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Janice, I so miss browsing in a bookstore too. I made so many wonderful discoveries just walking by tables and picking up interesting-looking books (especially in esoteric history topics.) The internet just isn't the same.
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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You're right, Janice—rationally (and medically) sugar isn't the best choice for stress. And usually I'm very sensible about my food choices. But there are times when a good nosh of sweets does seem a comfort, no matter what the medical research shows. That said, I totally agree that the best medicine of all is a good book, I have a number of comfort reads when I'm feeling really blue—for example, the Amelia Peabody series by the lat Elizabeth Peters never fails to make me laugh.
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Ha—well, that's definitely a comfort food when you're feeling under the weather, Liz. But somehow, chocolate does seem an even more surefire cure for ANY ill.
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, ha, Sonya. Yes, I think it's VERY important that you go bake some ANZAC cookies right now!
Toggle Commented Jul 11, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Oooooo, banana pudding. That sound lovely! I'm am slapping my hand right now to keep me from reaching for too many sweets!It's amazing how stress triggers VERY bad thoughts!
Toggle Commented Jul 11, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Anne! Squidgy chocolate brownies are a huge favorite too, as are oatmeal cookies with lots of raisins and walnuts. Am a big fan of Welsh cakes, though I've never made then either. The list could go on . . .I'm VERY fond of sweets!
Toggle Commented Jul 11, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Oh, those pudding cookies sound divine. I tend to like gooey treats, so they would be perfect. (But myst contain my sweet tooth or I won't fit through the door of the new place!)
Toggle Commented Jul 11, 2014 on Something to Munch On! at Word Wenches
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Cara/Andrea here, On occasion, rather than wax poetic about some bit of historical research or intriguing person who has caught our fancy, one of us Wenches will invoke the “Life Is Hitting Me Between the Eyes” rule offer up some lighter fare for you to munch on. Well, it’s my turn. I am in the midst of selling my house and buying a new place—the closing take place at the end of this month, and I am in a state of mild—well, more than mild panic. How did I accumulate so much STUFF to sort through. Not to speak of... Continue reading
Posted Jul 10, 2014 at Word Wenches
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So glad you enjoyed them, Donna. As I said, he was new to me as well, and I really enjoyed discovering his genius, so I'm happy that all of you my sharing them with you.
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Bona, thank you for the recommendation of Sorolla! He is a new-to-me artist, and I really like his paintings. Very summery indeed!
Toggle Commented Jun 29, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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You're welcome, Carolyn. So glad you enjoyed the. I believe the National Galley has some of his work, and the Tate, too—don't know about the Nelson Gallery.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Karin, Bonington is a fairly new discovery for me too. A friend of mine is a huge fan and showed me one of the paintings in a recent museum visit we made together, and I was hooked. Another wonderful artist whose life was too short was Thomas Girtin, who was a friend of Turner. He, too, died in his 20's, but the work he left is spectacular. Love Homer—his seascapes are some of my favorites!
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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So glad you enjoyed them, Elaine. For me, he really has a very unique artistic gift.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Oh, that swim sounds VERY cold. Hope they all had hot toddies waiting. Or they can look at some of Bonington's sunny scenes to warm the cockles! The solstice celebrations really are great fun, and something very elemental to our human nature, I think. It's good we stay in touch with our connection to the cycles of the natural world.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Ha, Sonya, apologies to our friends Down Under for talk of summer. But hopefully the pictures warmed and brightened the shortest day. I really love Bonington's sense of ethereal light and the way he seems to capture a fleeting moment. It feels so spontaneous and natural, just as one's eye sees a scene. That's an incredible artistic talent to have. Love the tourists painting themselves in the Sydney Harbor. It's a shame sketching skills have died away. Travelers used to record their impressions and I think it made them look at things more carefully, and really see their surroundings.
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Oh, Monet and the waterlilies! Perfect choice! Matisse is brilliant too—you are so right about his rendering of light, which is for me, what makes a painting sing.
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Glad you enjoyed his paintings, HJ. I really love his ethereal quality of light and water.
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2014 on Let There Be Light . . . at Word Wenches
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Cara/Andrea here, The summer equinox arrived this past weekend, which always puts me in a very travel frame of mind. Long days, glorious golden light, balmy nights—they seem to sing a siren’s song, beckoning one to set out and experience new sights, new settings. Now, those of us traveling today just whip out our i-phones and snap away merrily, recording our peregrinations with the mere flick of a finger. Regency travelers required far more skill to capture the essence of a place—and so in homage to the art of travel, thought I’d share a small sketch of one of my... Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2014 at Word Wenches
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