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Cara Elliott/Andrea Penrose
historical romance author
Recent Activity
Can't wait to read your mystery. S.K.! Love that you used the Tiger. And the theme of Luddite unrest sounds really intriguing! Have been toying with a mystery idea based on similar conflict. The advent of the Industrial Revolution/mechanization is a very interesting point in history.
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Interesting observation, Vicki. Yes, anyone who makes automata clearly has a mind that works in complex ways!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Jo, we do indeed do a lot of research, but for me that's really part of the fun of crafting an historical novel. I love learning about new things, so delving into a subject is a pleasure, not work.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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That's a great point about "The Nightingale." I had forgotten about that tale. Love that you used Tipoo's Tiger as a clue—sounds very intriguing. What's the name of your book with it in it? I think you will love 100 Things! Any person who loves history will find it a wonderful read.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Glenda. It was a lot of fun to write, and I hope readers enjoy both the scene and the whole book.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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So true, Nancy. The complexity is amazing. Many of these craftsmen were fabulous engineers.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Well, I'm a Nerd too, Annette, and couldn't agree more that curiosity about "weird" things does indeed make life interesting!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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The lace sounds lovely, Shannon. That sort of detail is exactly what I love to read about in historicals. Wasn't the Sotheby's guy right out of central casting It was such a fun video! The garden motif sounds perfect for a mystery, and I can imagine how weaving in certain plants to create atmosphere could have been very interesting research for the author. Lots of fascinating ways to create mood in a story!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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So glad to hear you enjoyed them, Gram!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Joanna, I have not yet seen the Silver Swan but have read about it. Must put it on the "To See" list!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Bona, thank you for such a thoughtful reply! Objects that have meaning or symbolism, like Kinsale's sword, add extra intrigue to a story, and their backstory is often very fascinating from a historical POV. Also, I, too, love learning about a craft or profession that no longer exists. Funny you should mention "100 Things"! I LOVE that book—in fact I did a blog on it here when it came out. It was absolutely wonderful—so many great stories behind the specific objects. To me, w it was history at its best, coming so alive through a visual detail from an era.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Glad you found it fun, Florence. Eloisa James did a funny weaving in of sewage and water closet details in one of her Desperate Duchesses books. You might enjoy that. And I'm not sure about when cuckoo clocks were invented, but I seem to recall it was very early—medieval automata were pretty advanced, and I think clocks were among the first mechanisms that attracted craftsmen.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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So glad you enjoyed,it, Cathy. And glad to know readers do like seeing arcane inventions.
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Karin, your music box sounds amazing! Love the three-tiered complexity. And love your mycology expertise. (Note to self: if you write a mushroom scene, be sure to research it VERY carefully.) It's fun to hear all the passions that readers have, and it reminds me to be extra vigilant in trying to get even small details right. But I like doing that, so it's all good!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Oh, Louisa, I want to read that book with the boiling villain! So glad you find the arcane little details of history as interesting as I do. Your music boxes sound amazing. They are a whole art unto themselves. The craftsmanship of this complicated mechanical works are truly astounding. I do have patience, but not the expertise. I have thought at times that I would enjoy watch making—the ones that have the moon phases and other "complications." But I have a feeling that's something that will remain merely a pleasant daydream!
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Interesting, Minna! I'm sure you're right about collectors being eager to scarf them up . . .not sure the quality would quite rival the singing bird pistol, but all those mechanical toys are pretty neat. We had a lovely, intricately carved cuckoo clock from my Swiss grandmother in our house when I was growing up, and that is an example of an automaton too. (Hmmm, I wonder where that went!)
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Isobel. The pistols were simply too good a discovery to pass up. It took a little thinking to come up with a plot device to fit them in, but I was determined! I really had a fun time writing Sinfully Yours.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2014 on Historical High Tech at Word Wenches
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Cara/Andrea here, For me part of the fun of writing Regency-set novels is discovering some arcane little fact to weave into the storyline. I confess it—I’m a total history nerd, and love reading reference books, visiting specialty museums, looking at art and architecture—anything that takes me back to a different world! I soak up the ambiance like a sponge. Now, inspiration can come from unexpected sources. I somehow stumbled over a small video on an item up for auction at Sotheby’s. I hit play and well, just knew the item had to be in one of my books. (you can... Continue reading
Posted Apr 3, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Janga, I am SO ready to see flowers and unfurling leaves. It snowed and hailed here this morning. I wanted to crawl back beneath the covers.
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Maria, I'm starting to carry my Kindle everywhere too, so I never get caught having to wait somewhere without something to read. It's really a very handy thing to tuck in a purse!
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Thanks so much, Shannon! So glad you enjoyed Passionately Yours! I'm a big Meljean Brooks fan too. Must remember to read more Steampunk, which I really enjoy.
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The Brecht/Weill opera production sounds wonderful, Karin—I do love the music. Will have to check out tickets.
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Wonderful interview, Anne and Mary Jo. And having recently read The Winter Bride (lucky me for getting an ARC) I can assure all readers that they are in for a beyond wonderful, heartwarming story!
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Ha, ha, ha. That could make quite a fun scene in a book . . .
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2014 on The Return of the Codpiece at Word Wenches
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Such a fun post,, Nicola! Did men really carry money in teir codpieces . ..along with the family jewels > Fetching it out to pay for something must have been, um, interesting to watch.
Toggle Commented Mar 27, 2014 on The Return of the Codpiece at Word Wenches
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