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Cara Elliott/Andrea Pickens
historical romance author
Recent Activity
Oh, fluttery sigh. I LOVE Timothy Dalton in that role. He had just the right smoldering tension.
Toggle Commented yesterday on Books to TV at Word Wenches
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How fun, Robyn. I did a lot of rletterpress printing in college, and choosing handmade papers, then dampening them just right to take the ink, was something I loved. The feel of really good paper is really wonderful.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Glad to hear of the synchronocity! (BTW, the course sounds great!)
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Thanks for sharing these memories. (I missed the big pencils, but what a silly idea!) Love the question mark stationery—clearly he knew you well! And love the links to the dictionary art. Wonderfully imaginative!
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Couldn't agree more, Mary. I'm trying to be mindful of sending handwritten notes to friends and family. I know how good I feel when I get one!
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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SO true about the beauty in everyday things, Stephanie. That's one of the reasons I love the V&A Museum in London, which celebrates everyday items. However I do see a renewed interest in quality things. I live near New York City, and go in often. I'm pleased to say there are more and more shops featuring good cards and paper, and other items made of quality material and craftsmanship. It makes me smile!
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Oh, I have several drawers full of lovely paper. I don't write as many letters as I'd like, But I do enjoy taking the time to do it. (And love getting a handwritten letter too.) I even have a brass seal and sealing wax for the envelope! Yes, I am a Luddite at heart.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Thanks for sharing, Oana-Marie! Recycling is very important, but I've actually seen some lovely recycled papers, that have very nice feel, texture and color. I'm sure they don't last as long as rag paper, but they are a big improvement on what you describe.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Lillian, I too, hate to see good quality paper disappearing from common places. But one can get good stuff—it just takes some looking. Papyrus, a chain that seems to be in a lot of cities, offers some nice writing papers. And traditional stationery makers like Crance's still offer lovely rag papers. Fine editions of classics still are being made, but alas they are expensive. I see a small trend back to appreciating well-made books. But you have to have a fat wallet. I so agree about the cookbooks. If you really use them in a kitchen, which I do, they don't last very well. And as for opening a recent book and seeing the paper is already turning brown with acid . . . Sigh.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Sue, I'm like you—I hate to waste paper. I think some innate sense tells me it's precious! Which it is to me. As child, I loved having paper to draw on, and my mother was very encouraging. All societies seem to have found a way of making paper—the Eygptians with papyrus, the Polynesians with coconut fibers . . .the babylonians with clay! Writing, or some sort of storytelling, does seem to be part of the human DNA.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Jottings on Paper at Word Wenches
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Andrea/Cara here, In my current Regency-set mystery WIP (more on that in a month or two!) one of the protagonists makes her living putting words and images on paper. Which got me to thinking about what an incredibly important basic commodity it was in the era. Communication—whether it be art, personal letters, scholarly ideas, firebrand political tracts, music, etc.—was dependent on paper, from the fine deckled edged watercolor papers to a common sheet of foolscap (though none of it, however humble, was cheap.) So let’s take a quick look at some of the historical highlights of papermaking in Great Britain... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Word Wenches
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Wonderful blog, Susan! I've been fascinated by falconry since reading T.H. White's The Once and Future King, when the young King Arthur was turned into a hawk by Merlin. I've never flown them, but have seen falconers give demonstrations several times in Scotland and England Where I saw a peregrine fly. Quite amazing as they are silent flyers.) I recently read H is for Hawk and found it very interesting—-though a bit gloomy. I would really love to fly the birds myself sometime. There is a place in Vermont that offers falconry and I hope to get up there sometime. Can't wait for your new book!
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on Peregrinations at Word Wenches
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Oh, very funny! And yes, I think the warmth of the electronics is an attraction. (As we all know, cats are exceedingly intelligent!)
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Boxes. What lovely visions of organization (even for cats!) Maybe at some point I will learn to try them. Sigh.
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, Jana! I agree! As as many of us have mentioned here, a messy desk ISN'T a messy desk to the owner—we know exactly where everything is!
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, Janice! yes, I'm afraid there are lots of distractions in my place. But even in a very stark surrounding, my brain would find a way to meander . . .
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Sounds lovely, Oana -Maria!
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Oh, I know exactly what you mean, Justine! I can usually unerringly find anything I need in a huge pile of stuff. Hard to describe how or why, but the piles of random books, papers, etc is VERY orderly, at least in my own brain!
Toggle Commented Sep 14, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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True, Annette, but a place that makes you feel happy does help the creative juices flow. That said, I've been trying other spots for an hour at atime, and handwriting with a pad, just to see if a different routine can spark more flow. it's interesting—I do find myself getting more flexible on where I work, which is all for the good.
Toggle Commented Sep 14, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Ha, ha, Kareni!I wish I could sit and sit onover a sun-kissed beach and read all day. But no . . . Glad you enjoyed the peek.
Toggle Commented Sep 14, 2016 on Where Do The Wenches Work? at Word Wenches
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Andrea/Cara here, We get a number of questions from readers about our writing processes and the behind-the-scenes things that go on in making a book come to life. And one query that seems to pop up regularly is where do we actually work? Well, since you asked . . . Mary Jo: I am falling off a deadline cliff, even more behind than usual. My desk is even more of a mess than usual. This is not helped by my twenty pound Panda cat, who sprawls and is not easily moved. I have constructed the Great Wall of Panda out... Continue reading
Posted Sep 13, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Shannon, the book on steam engines is "The Most Powerful Idea in the World" by William Rosen.It's a very interesting book, with a focus on the history of ideas. And you will learn a LOT about steam engines. I really enjoyed it, and got very good info for my WIP.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2016 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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Nancy, I've been reading a book on the history of steam engines, and the author has some fabulously interesting digressions into the history of patents in England. It's called "The Most Powerful Idea in the World" by William Rosen.It's a very interesting book, with a focus on the history of ideas.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2016 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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Yes, a fabulous list—am madly scribbling notes!
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2016 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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Jo's books always resonate, no matter how many times you re-read them.
Toggle Commented Aug 31, 2016 on What We're Reading at Word Wenches
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