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Les Blatt
Interests: Classic mystery stories, communications, writing, podcasting, blogging, traveling, social media, web 2.0
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Bev, speaking as one who is vertically challenged, I did feel compelled to read this one. As always, Craig Rice delivers - it's funny but also very dark. And I still have to try that Harold Kemp book starring the defunct dwarf...if I can find it... ;-)
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on "The Big Midget Murders" at Classic Mysteries
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You're welcome, Shane. I'll post something as soon as I hear from Ramble House that the book is available.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Companion for Carr? at Classic Mysteries
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Agreed, Bill. Wolfe's scheme is so thoroughly entertaining that I can reread it many times over without tiring of it.
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I've reviewed a lot of them, Margot, and there are links on the backlist page. I would have to say that Stout is my favorite American author of the period - the stories are well written, funny and genuinely clever, and I suspect most of us who read the books do so for the regular characters, who feel like part of our families.
Toggle Commented Feb 23, 2015 on "The Red Box" at Classic Mysteries
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True, Yvette. With my Kindle, I become a walking library - never run out of things to read on the plane. Or when I'm supposed to be doing something else, alas. I have dozens of books on my Kindle awaiting further attention. Ah well, there are worse problems... ;-)
Toggle Commented Feb 22, 2015 on "Lament for a Lady Laird" at Classic Mysteries
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I've read several of them now, Bev, and I enjoy them thoroughly. A nice blend of thriller and classic puzzle, and I love the personalities of the two central characters!
Toggle Commented Feb 16, 2015 on "Lament for a Lady Laird" at Classic Mysteries
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Yes indeed, Bev - that's exactly the kind of dialogue I'm talking about. It is VERY funny indeed - and the mystery is still quite carefully worked out.
Toggle Commented Feb 9, 2015 on "No Wind of Blame" at Classic Mysteries
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I enjoy authors such as Heyer, Craig Rice and Phoebe Atwood Taylor who were able to mix humor with their mystery, Margot. This one is quite funny - and a pretty good mystery, too.
Toggle Commented Feb 9, 2015 on "No Wind of Blame" at Classic Mysteries
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Tracy, I'm really not sure why she isn't better known and/or better received in the U.S. I find Sloan and his colleagues to be very good company, with Crosby and their boss, Superintendent Leeyes, usually providing some comic relief. The mysteries are well-conceived, I think, with interesting and intelligent plots.
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I love most of Crispin's books, including the short stories, Margot, and I'm delighted to see so many of them back in print. I think you would enjoy re-reading this one.
Toggle Commented Feb 5, 2015 on Looking Back: "Swan Song" at Classic Mysteries
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Felony & Mayhem Press are republishing it this week, Bev, in both print and e-book versions. It's really quite good (although it's not really an academic mystery - the only connection is through the scientist/professor who is really more of an inventor than an academic). I think you'd enjoy it.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2015 on "Skeleton Key" at Classic Mysteries
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I don't know, Joan - he mentions it briefly again at the end of this month's column. I enjoy his writing as well. We'll see what really happens...
Toggle Commented Jan 31, 2015 on Mike Check at Classic Mysteries
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I haven't seen the movie you're talking about, Yvette, but I can tell you that Ostrander's blind detective, Damon Gaunt, was one of at least three blind detectives from the same general time period. One was Thornley Colton, known as "The Problemist," the creation of Clinton H. Stagg - in fact, he's one of the detectives parodied in Christie's Tommy and Tuppence novel, "Partners in Crime." Another was Max Carrados, the blind detective created by Ernest Bramah. I'm sure other readers may know of other examples, too!
Toggle Commented Jan 30, 2015 on "At 1:30" at Classic Mysteries
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Thanks for the suggestions, John. And I too am VERY unhappy with the number of sloppy scanning jobs that are ruining too many e-book reprints. It's not necessary - there are a lot of e-book publishers who do a good job at it - in my experience, Felony & Mayhem and Open Road/Mysterious Press certainly are conscientious. I just finished reading a Resurrected Press e-book of Arthur Rees's "The Hand in the Dark" which had, as best as I could tell, just ONE typo in the entire book. It CAN be done properly. Now I'll get off MY soapbox too.
Toggle Commented Jan 28, 2015 on "At 1:30" at Classic Mysteries
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Thanks, Margot. Publishers are starting to find earlier authors, many of whom were quite popular in their day but who are now forgotten, and getting the rights to republish those books. It's a bonanza for those of us who love traditional mysteries. Tom Schantz of the Rue Morgue Press calls it rescuing them from biblioblivion.
Toggle Commented Jan 26, 2015 on "At 1:30" at Classic Mysteries
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Thank you, Joan!
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on AHMM and the Red Dot at Classic Mysteries
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Thanks, Bev and Sam!
Toggle Commented Jan 21, 2015 on AHMM and the Red Dot at Classic Mysteries
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As a matter of fact, John, my review of "At 1:30" is scheduled for next week - should be posted here and on the podcast on Monday. Gaunt's a fascinating character; speaking of hair, I also love how he asked one female character why her hair is wet - when he cannot see it - and explains that wet hair has a distinctive odor. The book is full of similar touches.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2015 on New Year, Centennial Challenge at Classic Mysteries
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Margot and Bev, agreed (again) on all points, particularly on the wit. And this is, I think, one of the most sympathetic of Marsh's victims. Too many Golden Age novelists used the victim pretty much as a colorless starting point (or the character was unpleasant enough that the reader wouldn't care about him/her). Not so in this case, where Marsh takes some time to build that character and to make us care about him, as the other characters in the book cared about him.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2015 on "Death in a White Tie" at Classic Mysteries
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I really enjoy Daly, Bev. Her first couple of books weren't as strong, IMHO, as her later ones, but she quickly became expert at fooling readers and hiding clues in plain sight. My favorite, I think, is still Book of the Dead - a final confrontation scene that really took my breath away. (And I've just sent you an e-mail with my choices... ?-)
Toggle Commented Jan 13, 2015 on "Night Walk" at Classic Mysteries
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Agreed, Tom Cat. "Cake in the Hat Box" is another very good one. So is "The Mystery of Swordfish Reef," which has some interesting similarities to "Man of Two Tribes." And another favorite is "The Clue of the New Shoe." Most of the books, in fact, are terrific; Bony is a fascinating character. I must admit I hadn't thought of the similarities to the Queen book, but it's been a long time since I read that one...sigh...may be time for another re-read...
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2015 on "Man of Two Tribes" at Classic Mysteries
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Bev, I really think you would enjoy this one. Not only is Bony at his best in the outback and the wilderness of the Nullarbor Plain, his discoveries as he searches for the missing woman are really unforeseen and his reaction...well, pure Bony.
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2015 on "Man of Two Tribes" at Classic Mysteries
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It's a first rate series, Margot, and I do plan to review more of them as we move ahead.
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on "Man of Two Tribes" at Classic Mysteries
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There are a lot of people, Tracy, who don't like Facebook. And there's no question that it can eat time. On the other hand, I enjoy the GAD group very much - there are a lot of very good people (including some fine authors, such as Martin Edwards) who are eager to discuss books, answer questions, etc. (Though I must admit that being retired has helped me deal with the time problem!)
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Yvette, the same to you and yours in the new year. I'll keep an eye out for new entries at your blog. I hope the new art project will be enjoyable and successful!
Toggle Commented Jan 4, 2015 on Forward with Resolution at Classic Mysteries
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