This is Marc Osten's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Marc Osten's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Marc Osten
Recent Activity
You wrote "Marc - I've forgotten slightly what you said the distinction between learning log and action plan would be. So, I'm just going to try and post in the right place, and if I get it wrong, just let me know. :)" You are doing great. Learning log just for reflection on what you do that works. THE KEY IS NOT TO MAKE GENERAL STATEMENTS BUT THINGS LIKE: "Today I did this and here is how it felt." Do this for the decisions you made that worked AND THOSE THAT DIDN'T. Like for example, you wrote "1. I LOVE talking to my roommate! She is such a great listener, and we make a perfect pair in terms of emotionally supporting one another." What I would add to the end is: "The lesson for me here is how important it is that I focus on relationships where I feel listened to." ...or ... "I just had lunch with Joe. It was nice but in a way left me wanting more. What I really needed today was a friend who could listen to me as I'm going through a rough time. A couple times I started to share and then he kinda took over and started trying to solve the problem for me. All I needed was someone to listen. I rarely have time to sit and have a long lunch ... maybe next time I'll invite David. That doesn't mean never being with people like Joe but maybe changing my expectations of what he/they can realistically give me." Why - If you develop a simple 'list of things' to post on your fridge, bathroom mirror, on your bedroom alarm table, etc.. then you'll remind yourself to do the things that feed your heart with 'goodness.' That means you can hold off the cynicism and other negatives that deplete people who want to make change in the world and also need to live in a system/society that doesn't support your efforts. Make sense?
1 reply
OK Alix! Rock on and remember not to censor yourself. let it all hang out. The graphic might help. You could even list things that relate to each circle to get started and then see how it starts to fit together, or not!
1 reply
Image
From Thrillist - We live in a world where food is no longer simply enjoyed. It's obsessed over, with each bite photographed and every single ingredient traced back to its origins like some sort of artisanal Ancestry.com. This increased fetishization of food has spawned the food snob, whose borderline psychosis makes even the simple act of enjoying a meal into an endless parade of ridiculous behavior. They come in all shapes and sizes. These are the most common species. Read on. Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Not long ago the author Michael Pollan penned a great article in the Washington Post titled How a national food policy could save millions of lives. It is a MUST READ for any of you who frequent this vlog. It is a call to action regarding safe, affordable and easily accessible healthy food. As far as action we can take is concerned, Food Policy Action is worth checking out. They make it very simple to understand where your legislators stand on food policy issues. Finally, the video below is an incredible talk by Tom Colliccho who most us foodies revere... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Thanks Michael - Next week I'm posting the final of the three. It is an interview with Jake Katz ... yes a real Katz owner!
1 reply
Image
OK! I'm a broken record. Simple, simple, simple is good, good, good! This is a salad that my cousin Levana taught me how to make and it is quick and simple. I've adjusted it slightly. See the additional notes to get the exact recipe Levana uses below my simplified version which is: 1/2 head of cabbage 1/4 to 1/2 cup canola oil 1/4 to 1/2 cup white wine vinegar A handful of roasted slivered almonds Additional Notes: Adjust the quantity of oil and vinegar based on the size of your cabbage and how tart you like your salads. I'm a... Continue reading
Posted Feb 22, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Below the video are some rules of the road for roasting vegetables! 1. Cut your vegetables into similar sizes to ensure cooking consistency and crispy browning. 2. Toss in a mixing bowl with olive oil and salt 3. Make sure each piece has room. Don't crowd the pan! 4. Use a simple roasting pan lined with parchment paper or a silpat. What is silpat? 5. Roast at 400-425 degrees F. 6. When they start to brown a bit then toss them to encourage browning on all sides 7. Poke with a fork to determine when the veggies are done. Note... Continue reading
Posted Feb 16, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Image
I won't lie. Preparing this duck is a culinary workout. Several hours of work but the results are worth it. It is by far the best duck I've ever had. I first had it at a Jody Adam's restaurant in Boston back in the 80's. In the very least try the marinade and use it with chicken. I guarantee you it will be a big hit. Below are pictures of my most recent effort. They follow the duck through its 3 hour journey in the oven, and here is the full recipe. The marinade details are below the pictures. Ready... Continue reading
Posted Feb 10, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Michael - It really is amazing how much clutter I collect and then never let go of. I'm embarrassed at the number of knives I now own. Quite a few I only use once or twice a year and frankly one of the four I mostly use would suffice for virtually every task I have in the kitchen.
1 reply
Thanks Michael. It really felt like a special moment in a special place...and as luck would have it there was no way I'd have found it if I didn't have so many traveling snafus for most of the day. Ciao my dear old friend.
1 reply
Image
It's counter-intuitive but dull knives can be far more dangerous that sharp knives. For me, hand sharpening stinks. I can't do it very well and look stupid trying. So a few years ago I broke down and bought an inexpensive $30 electric sharpener. I use it every month or two and it is AMAZING. I'll never try to hand sharpen again. The video below gives you more detail. It's from a great source called the Webstaurant. Ciao4Now! Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Image
I have way to many knives but there are four that I use 90% of the time. The four that I recommend are: Chefs Knife - 10-12 inch blade Bread Knife - 8 to 10 inch Utility Knife - 6-8 inch blade Paring Knife - 4 inch blade Below is a photo of the four knives. Below that is a handy chart from Milly's Store that you will find helpful. Click on it to see a larger version. How to sharpen them in Episode 137. Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
I know Jamie. You should have seen this bar. Definitely not a place I'd expect to get such a meal. Every night they put only one meal on the menu. You can only imagine what is served on other nights.
1 reply