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Marc Osten
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OK! I'm a broken record. Simple, simple, simple is good, good, good! This is a salad that my cousin Levana taught me how to make and it is quick and simple. I've adjusted it slightly. See the additional notes to get the exact recipe Levana uses below my simplified version which is: 1/2 head of cabbage 1/4 to 1/2 cup canola oil 1/4 to 1/2 cup white wine vinegar A handful of roasted slivered almonds Additional Notes: Adjust the quantity of oil and vinegar based on the size of your cabbage and how tart you like your salads. I'm a... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Marc's Culinary Compass
Below the video are some rules of the road for roasting vegetables! 1. Cut your vegetables into similar sizes to ensure cooking consistency and crispy browning. 2. Toss in a mixing bowl with olive oil and salt 3. Make sure each piece has room. Don't crowd the pan! 4. Use a simple roasting pan lined with parchment paper or a silpat. What is silpat? 5. Roast at 400-425 degrees F. 6. When they start to brown a bit then toss them to encourage browning on all sides 7. Poke with a fork to determine when the veggies are done. Note... Continue reading
Posted Feb 16, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
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I won't lie. Preparing this duck is a culinary workout. Several hours of work but the results are worth it. It is by far the best duck I've ever had. I first had it at a Jody Adam's restaurant in Boston back in the 80's. In the very least try the marinade and use it with chicken. I guarantee you it will be a big hit. Below are pictures of my most recent effort. They follow the duck through its 3 hour journey in the oven, and here is the full recipe. The marinade details are below the pictures. Ready... Continue reading
Posted Feb 10, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
Michael - It really is amazing how much clutter I collect and then never let go of. I'm embarrassed at the number of knives I now own. Quite a few I only use once or twice a year and frankly one of the four I mostly use would suffice for virtually every task I have in the kitchen.
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Thanks Michael. It really felt like a special moment in a special place...and as luck would have it there was no way I'd have found it if I didn't have so many traveling snafus for most of the day. Ciao my dear old friend.
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It's counter-intuitive but dull knives can be far more dangerous that sharp knives. For me, hand sharpening stinks. I can't do it very well and look stupid trying. So a few years ago I broke down and bought an inexpensive $30 electric sharpener. I use it every month or two and it is AMAZING. I'll never try to hand sharpen again. The video below gives you more detail. It's from a great source called the Webstaurant. Ciao4Now! Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
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I have way to many knives but there are four that I use 90% of the time. The four that I recommend are: Chefs Knife - 10-12 inch blade Bread Knife - 8 to 10 inch Utility Knife - 6-8 inch blade Paring Knife - 4 inch blade Below is a photo of the four knives. Below that is a handy chart from Milly's Store that you will find helpful. Click on it to see a larger version. How to sharpen them in Episode 137. Continue reading
Posted Feb 3, 2015 at Marc's Culinary Compass
I know Jamie. You should have seen this bar. Definitely not a place I'd expect to get such a meal. Every night they put only one meal on the menu. You can only imagine what is served on other nights.
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For more information about the snowshoe and fondue trip as well as a couple other good spots near Mont Tremblant just visit the Culinary Compass Map For a simple way to make fondu at home see the two videos below. Continue reading
Posted Feb 28, 2014 at Marc's Culinary Compass
JAMIE - How do they prep them?
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Come on Eric...you know as well as anyone that it doesn't take much to get people invested. Think back to your days in the classroom with the little ones. Miss ya much...give R a bit hug and kiss.
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My friend Jeanne wrote: "Curious about the fennel pesto Marc – share recipe? Were you happy with it? " ---------------- OK Jeanne - No formal recipe but basically any basic pesto recipe you like but replace the pine nuts with almonds. The add to taste: - Ground fennel seed. Probably a 1-2 tbs. per cup pesto - Finely chopped fennel bulb...I use A LOT. Maybe 1/4 to 1/2 cup per cup already prepared pesto. - Fresh squeezed lemon to taste. I'm an acid freak so in my case about 1/2 squeezed lemon per cup prepared pesto. That assumes the ravioli has a filling that melds well with the acid.
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Fennel Ginger Granita (12 servings as a palate clenser) 1. Bring 6 cups of water, 1/4 cup of roughly chopped ginger, 1 tablespoon of fennel seeds and 3/4 cup of sugar to a boil. 2. Once it reaches a boil turn the heat off and let the mixture sit until it is at room temperature. 3. Pout the mixtured though a strainer into a shallow glass container and place in the freezer. 4. Watch Culinary Compass episodes 48 and 49 for details on what to do next. Fennel Themes Dinner Party Menu Continue reading
Posted Jul 17, 2013 at Marc's Culinary Compass
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Usually I sow a row of lettuce seeds every 2 weeks between mid-May and late-June to assure a constant lettuce supply all summer into autumn. In episode 32 I detail how I do it. Also, below the photos are some tips on growing lettuce in the brutal summer heat. First please indulge my need to kvetch, wannabee poet style. Too darn hot to plant seeds but, heat breaks, crocs on and shovel sharpened. Bloodsucking skeeters drive me out but, still some seeds safely in the ground. Thunderstorms wash most seeds away but, some live and put down tender silky roots.... Continue reading
Posted Jul 12, 2013 at Marc's Culinary Compass