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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you Camilla :) I am totally happy with the way it turned out: I read a lot of recipes, but only had that one memory to guide me (and I never asked Chef Gaytan what his mole's ingredients are).
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2018 on chocolate love: mole poblano at briciole
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I agree, Wendy, and for that reason it was important for me to devote to it the time it required. In Italian cuisine we have dishes for special occasions that are like mole: their preparation cannot be rushed. It is a kind of celebration.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2018 on chocolate love: mole poblano at briciole
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You are welcome, Cathy. It is always a pleasure. I get to share musings about what I read and get motivated to continue writing on my blog, which is getting old and venerable :)
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2018 on Novel Food #32: the finale at briciole
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You are welcome, Debra :) It is certainly not something to try without planning, but on the other hand, a number of steps can be done in advance.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2018 on chocolate love: mole poblano at briciole
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Thank you Cathy. I was a bit concerned about making it too hot, but I had some beginner's luck: none of my versions exceeded my preferences. I can also tell you that it freezes well. I am planning to make some more when I consume my stash :)
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2018 on chocolate love: mole poblano at briciole
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You're such a good gardener! Considering the amount of time and effort a garden requires, I can imagine the strong desire not to let anything go to waste. I expect the little one will be helping you with planting ;)
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I like that kind of challenge, Cathy: it promotes creativity in the kitchen. Yes, it is a nice book.
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Thank you, Phil. Glad you enjoyed the roundup. The summer edition will start in a couple of months. I hope you find time for some quiet reading :)
Toggle Commented Mar 31, 2018 on Novel Food #32: the finale at briciole
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Save some for the next edition, Debra. Have a great weekend you too :)
Toggle Commented Mar 31, 2018 on Novel Food #32: the finale at briciole
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You are welcome, Debra. I thought about your beet recipe this morning as I brought back from the farmers market a large bunch of beet greens left behind by someone who only wanted the beets. I just finished cooking the greens with some kale from my garden.
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Thank you, Claudia. None of the versions I made was too hot. One thing I did to keep the heat mild was not to use any of the seeds. I also made sure that none of the chile varieties I used is labeled "hot" (the brand in the photo does that, which is helpful).
Toggle Commented Mar 31, 2018 on chocolate love: mole poblano at briciole
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Welcome to the roundup of the 32nd edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007. Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Every edition delivers a great reading list and a lovely set of recipes. Book-loving food bloggers have contributed posts, each describing a literary work that the blogger read and the dish that the reading inspired. Please, follow me on a short literary/culinary... Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2018 at briciole
It was an inspiring book, wasn't it? Great dish and elegant presentation :)
Please, do not worry, Deb. I ended up being late too, due to a series of non-serious but time-guzzling mishaps. See you at the summer edition :)
Toggle Commented Mar 29, 2018 on Announcing: Novel Food #32 at briciole
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Wonderful flavors indeed, Frank, and not easy to replicate, so there is the added pleasure of eating unique dishes :)
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a vegan version of mole poblano that goes with vegetables (napkin by La FABBRICA del LINO) In September 2014, I attended LongHouse, where I met Carlos Gaytan, chef of the restaurant Mexique in Chicago1. He brought his mole sauce to the event and I fell in love with something I had not tasted before. Since then, I have kept alive a desire to make a version of mole poblano and finally the current selection of the Cook the Books club, The Discovery of Chocolate by James Runcie2 gave me the necessary nudge. In this historical novel, young Diego travels to the... Continue reading
Posted Mar 27, 2018 at briciole
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Thank you, Kelly :) I hope you'll enjoy it.
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there is no secret, though there is a sauce (napkin by La FABBRICA del LINO) I enjoyed reading the novel Among the Lesser Gods by Margo Catts1 more than I expected. I read Deb of Kahakai Kitchen's review2 tried my luck at her giveaway and won a copy. Once I started reading the book, it was hard to put it down: I wanted to know whether Elena would sort out her life, how the children she takes care of would adjust to their new life, whether the truth of Elena's aunt's disappearance decades earlier would eventually emerge. Everything in the book... Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2018 at briciole
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Great description of what chocolate brings to mole, Cathy: it's magical! I cannot forget the first time I tasted it at LongHouse 2014, made by Chef Carlos Gaytan. In retrospect, I should have asked how many ingredients he used. It is definitely a labor of love and it goes well with various foods. Thank you so much for contributing to Novel Food and Cook the Books.
Great! Thank you Debra :)
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2018 on Announcing: Novel Food #32 at briciole
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Thank you, Claudia :)
Toggle Commented Mar 3, 2018 on Announcing: Novel Food #32 at briciole
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Spring is on its way and with it comes another edition of Novel Food, the culinary/literary event with a long history, going back to the fall of 2007. I read a lot and cook a lot and although many things in my life have changed in the years since, those two pillars still stand and support me. I am announcing another edition of Novel Food, a little voyage of literary discovery and also a delightful party with the literary-inspired dishes contributed by event's participants. I hope you will join. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a... Continue reading
Posted Feb 27, 2018 at briciole
Thank you, Cathy :) A narrative that makes characters come alive also makes certain events feel more real (Aelia's death, the treatment of slaves or of traitors and their progeny, the latter quite brutal). The food part was quite interesting and I enjoy reading about the foods of that time.
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Thank you Wendy. It was rather serendipitous, like many things in the kitchen. I was making the dish, I had just cooked some beans and I thought "What if...?" It worked! :)
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It is, Claudia, and made with vegetables that are available pretty much year round, which I like. The flavor of anchovies is quite mild so the dish can accompany meat. Let me know if you try it :)
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