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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you, Cathy :) A narrative that makes characters come alive also makes certain events feel more real (Aelia's death, the treatment of slaves or of traitors and their progeny, the latter quite brutal). The food part was quite interesting and I enjoy reading about the foods of that time.
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Thank you Wendy. It was rather serendipitous, like many things in the kitchen. I was making the dish, I had just cooked some beans and I thought "What if...?" It worked! :)
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It is, Claudia, and made with vegetables that are available pretty much year round, which I like. The flavor of anchovies is quite mild so the dish can accompany meat. Let me know if you try it :)
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cooked celery has a milder flavor than raw one, Tina. Try using is a squash stuffing with some cheese and nuts: so good! :)
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I like the comparison, Frank. As you know, in Italy you can get una costa di sedano but here you get the whole head and it's been on my wish list to find ways to use it before it wilts. Now I can't get enough of it :)
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Yes, Debra. Now I know what to do with the beautiful celery I see at the farmers' market. A nice read on an interesting topic: thank you for choosing it :)
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a plateful of flavor (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) The historical novel Feast of Sorrow by Crystal King, the current selection of our Cook the Books Club, was quite an interesting read. While the narrator is a slave named Thrasius, the protagonist is his owner, Marcus Gavius Apicius, who lived in the 1st century during the reign of the Emperor Tiberius and became famous for his love of food and his sumptuous dinners. Rich and ambitious, he is driven by the desire to become culinary advisor to the emperor. The pact with the devil (Sejanus) he makes exacts a high... Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2018 at briciole
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You are welcome Debra :) Happy New Year!
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Hello Joanne. Thank you for sharing your memories. I am glad my post brought them back: they sound delicious. Happy Holidays!
Toggle Commented Dec 24, 2017 on rocciata at briciole
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Thank you, Cathy :)
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I just couldn't get it out of my head, Debra :)
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Thank you, Wendy :)
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Thank you Deb :)
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I consider myself lucky, Frank. I not always find it, but when I do, it's such a treat. As with other traditional Italian vegetables, radicchio seem to be more available and in its different varieties, which is great.
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I know, Claudia, it's like an ode to ephemerality, and so all the more precious :)
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a brilliant flavor behind subdued color (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) A few pages into The Patriarch by Martin Walker, the current selection of our Cook the Books Club, I had this image of Bruno, the protagonist, as a head of cabbage and Pamela, his girlfriend (who in the course of the novel becomes his ex) as a head of radicchio1. Bruno reminded me of a head of cabbage because, although he is a pleasant and sensitive person, a smart and conscientious policeman, a gardener, a cook, a horseback rider and dog owner, you'd probably overlook him at a party... Continue reading
Posted Nov 29, 2017 at briciole
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Thank you for visiting my blog, Abi, and for your question. You'd want a creamy consistency here, so ricotta salata would not work. True ricotta, though, would. I make it at home when I have leftover whey from making cheese and use it regularly in variations of this tart. As I mention in the recipe, fromage blanc is an alternative. I have never cooked with Greek yogurt, so I don't know how it would react to baking in this way, but it is used to make tart fillings, so it is worth a try. I would drain it a bit to make sure there is no excess whey. If you try, please, let me know how it goes. Thanks!
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Welcome to my blog, Supriya, and thank you for your kind words :)
Toggle Commented Nov 21, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Thank you, Amy :)
Toggle Commented Nov 21, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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Thank you, Phil. There is a nice variety of reading material on display here: I hope you'll find something that catches your imagination.
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2017 on Novel Food #31: the finale at briciole
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I don't blame you, Frank. It is indeed the perfect time for apples. I remember my first visit to DC, many years ago, I visited the Dupont circle farmers' market and bought a whole bunch of apples of varieties I had never tasted before. I ate nothing else for the whole time I was there.
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2017 on Novel Food #31: the finale at briciole
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Grazie, David. Definitely use some of that soft white to make crostata. I love rye bread! Rye is in general a tasty grain. I know Rhonda has experimented with rye and chocolate and that's something I'd like to do as well. By the way, check also the dinner rolls on the next post: I use your spelt flour to make them :)
Toggle Commented Oct 17, 2017 on apple tart / crostata di mele at briciole
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My pleasure, as always, Debra. I am already thinking about #32 :)
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2017 on Novel Food #31: the finale at briciole
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Thank you, Debra, glad you do :) It was fun playing with that.
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Welcome to the roundup of the 31st edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007 — 10 years ago! Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. I continue to host this event with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Once again, book-loving food bloggers have contributed a set of lovely posts, each describing a literary work that the blogger read and the dish that the reading inspired. Please, follow me on a short literary/culinary tour. For each... Continue reading
Posted Oct 14, 2017 at briciole