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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you, Cathy. For once I am actually ahead: I have already read the current selection and prepared the dish. Finding the time to write the post is my next challenge. Hang in there, spring is just around the corner. It's not cold here but quite wet and windy, with more to come.
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Tina, I recommend you try some persimmon when in season. They are so versatile!
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Maybe one day the two of you will meet and you can talk about your home city ;) Glad you joined this round, Cathy. Lovely recipe!
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Butter Almond Cake at Delaware Girl Eats
Glad you got some persimmons to taste, Wendy. I love all varieties. When their season is over, I buy dry ones and snack on them.
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Thank you, Claudia and thanks for letting me know you made some tahini dressing and liked it :)
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Thank you Frank. In the winter I need color therapy on my plate ;)
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You are welcome, Deb. Glad you like the salad and indeed, I am discovering that persimmon goes well with a lot of foods, besides being a delicious snack. I managed to find some more at the farmers' market earlier this week and I was overjoyed :)
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the salad looks nice in a Limoges tureen (zuppiera)1 (tablecloth by La FABBRICA del LINO) During winter months, usually soup is on the table more often than salad. This year, however, I am having an intense relationship with raw cabbage. It's not that I discovered it, but I've been reminded how much I like a salad of finely shredded cabbage, and how much I enjoy playing with it, adding various ingredients and tasting the results. One such ingredient recently has been pan-roasted salmon, prepared according to the recipe2 in Jessica Fechtor's memoir Stir3, the current selection of our Cook the Books... Continue reading
Posted Jan 10, 2017 at briciole
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Thank you for your note, Sue. Denser polenta that can be sliced with a string and then dressed is a delicious northern Italian tradition.
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Thank you Deb! I'll be right over to check the roundup. Have a great week :)
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You are welcome, Debra. One of the things that makes our club fascinating is seeing how different people react to different aspects of the same book. For me in particular, it is important to explain what I liked or don't about a book: sometimes it's easy, other time it isn't so obvious. And of course, I love seeing what everybody chooses to cook from each selection :)
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They are, Cathy. I also like supporting farmers that grow lesser-known varieties of beans. I hope we don't lose them and end up with just a few varieties on the market, the way it's happened with apples. The blender made the tahini project quick and I like being able to make a reasonable amount. It's usually sold in large jars and I don't consume enough of it.
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You are welcome, Wendy. Glad you like my choice of dish :)
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Thank you Claudia. There are a few videos of the Pranzo, all in Italian. This is probably the best in terms of giving an idea of it via the images of both the kitchen (open-fire cooking!) and the dining area: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmFdvzGIuS0 You'll see the beans at the beginning, dressed with olive oil. Then they serve a fish broth soup with rice and local fish.
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Poetry does speak across cultures, languages and time, Frank. I love beans and like exploring new varieties and new flavor combinations. Right now I am playing with cavolo romanesco: we'll see what happens ;)
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I am sure that staying at Julia's house was quite inspirational. I didn't know Paul had illustrated Mastering the Art II. I am sure all the characters of the novel would like a taste of your dessert. Thank you for contributing to this edition of Cook the Books.
You are welcome, Shaheen. Thank you for participating :)
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My pleasure, Lisa, as always :)
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Thank you Siri. Same to you!
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Hosting the 101st edition of MLLA, created by Susan of The Well-Seasoned Cook and now hosted by Lisa of Lisa's Kitchen was, as in previous occasions, a great pleasure. Throughout the past month, I have received contributions from around the world, delicious variations on the theme of legumes. Hosting an event means having the pleasure of collecting and then sharing the collection — of savoring in solitude each dish as it is submitted to me, and then inviting everybody to the final banquet. It was a great pleasure to welcome new participants to the party and to say Hi! to old... Continue reading
Posted Dec 1, 2016 at briciole
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Flavors from around the world Federico García Lorca1 is one of my favorite poets, so when I came across a novel whose protagonist's name was Lorca, I had to read it: I am glad I followed my impulse. Jessica Soffer's Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots2 is the current selection of our Cook the Books Club. The book brings together a group of people who all carry a heavy burden of pain: the pain of exile from homeland and from motherhood, the pain of an aloof mother and an absent father, the pain of loneliness, abandonment, inadequacy. Food is one way through... Continue reading
Posted Nov 28, 2016 at briciole
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