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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Thank you, Deb, for your kind words. Maybe instead of thinking about a restaurant I could think about how to make food shareable via the internet.
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Thank you, Vicki. I am rather passionate about learning to make various pasta shapes. There is quite a bit of practicing that happens before I become ready to show my hands on video.
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Thank you, Wendy.
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Thank you, Claudia. I would love to teach a pasta class in your neck of the woods. I am afraid that for now it is a dream, but dreams sometimes come true, so I will continue to hope.
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E' stato davvero emozionante, Resy, ed e' un'esperienza che spero tutti possano fare. Come anche vedere da vicino le balene.
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La Nuova Zelanda e' bellissima, Marta, e ci tornerei immediatamente, perche' ne abbiamo visto solo un pezzetto. E la gente e' molto ospitale. Gli incontri con i pinguini sono stati emozionanti, soprattutto quello a Pilots' Beach. Qui passiamo dalla pioggia al sole alla pioggia e va bene cosi'. Io vado zuppa a go-go ;-)
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I saw my first black-crowned night heron only recently: such a beautiful bird! I actually saw it during the day, on Humboldt Bay, a special treat. Pt. Lobos is an amazing place, any day of the year.
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Thank you Frank. Doing it over and over again is the only approach I can suggest. The women from Bari have been making orecchiette since they were little girls and we should give ourselves time to become comfortable with the technique. And never forget to have fun while learning :)
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] an inviting bowl of soup (placemat by La FABBRICA del LINO) The 23rd country of our World Culinary ABC1 is New Zealand (Nuova Zelanda), a country we visited 11 years ago. I have a trunkful of great memories from the trip and only a thimbleful of space here, so the following is just a taste (assaggio). Karekare2, the beach made famous by the movie The Piano (North Island). We kayaked in many places, including the Kenepuru Sound (one of the Marlborough Sounds in the South Island) and Lake Manapouri4 (South Island). The... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at briciole
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strascnat (orecchiette) with crescenza cheese Orecchiette literally means “small ears” (orecchie means ears in Italian). To make them, small pieces of dough are drawn across the wooden board with a blunt-tipped knife, or are stretched and turned inside out on a fingertip. The latter method is the one I showed in my previous posts on orecchiette.1 A video of a woman from Bari making strascnat (the name used in that city for orecchiette)2 revealed to me the beauty of the former method. As the woman interviewed in this article3 (in Italian) says: "the women of Bari use the knife, the women... Continue reading
Posted Jan 29, 2016 at briciole
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I roast a lot of winter squashes too and like them simply seasoned. One thing I discovered at LongHouse 2 years ago is that roasted squash with mole sauce is divine.
It does, Jasmin. I hope you'll get to try it.
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Thank you, Evelyne.
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Your pasta looks nice! Indeed, practice is key. And remember that even the pieces that don't look perfect are good to eat.
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Ciao Marta. Molte versioni hanno il pomodoro crudo, se lo preferisci, ma il risultato non mi e' piaciuto tanto come questo col concentrato. Puoi certamente provare a dimezzarlo. Secondo me viene bene anche senza, magari con un peperone arrosto (questo mi e' venuto in mente adesso e lo provero'). Grazie per il commento sulla foto :)
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Dear Meadow, thank you so much for your kind words. I am glad you found my blog useful and I am glad you are having fun making pasta by hand. The naming of pasta in Italy is a complex topic. The same pasta shape has different names and the same name may describe different pasta shapes, all depending on geography. So, cavatelli is not a unique pasta shape, as you can read in the chapter dedicated to them in the Encyclopedia of Pasta. The dough for Sardinian gnocchetti contains saffron, a characteristic unique to them. None of the types of cavatelli I have seen resembles my gnocchetti, which, on the other hand, resemble the malloreddus a colleague of mine from Sardinia used to make (this is years ago, when I was still living in Italy and unfortunately I never saw her actually making them, but I remember their shape).
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] help yourself: it won't last long (tablecloth by La FABBRICA del LINO) The 22nd country of our World Culinary ABC1 is Russia (Russia). In researching dishes from that country I happened upon an interesting cookbook Please to the Table: The Russian Cookbook by Anya Von Bremzen, John Welchman2 where I read about Vegetable Caviars: "The Russians adore caviar and they love vegetables. So, voilà! the perfect culinary hybrid. These vegetable caviars have a terrific reputation." I was intrigued by that with eggplant (ikra), of which, I soon discovered, there are countless versions.... Continue reading
Posted Jan 10, 2016 at briciole
Hello Joann and thank you for stopping by. Based on Bruno's quote, I believe this is the song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RssxxSSmeI Make sure you expand the text section (where it says "show more"): you will find the lyrics and a translation.
Toggle Commented Jan 7, 2016 on cinque canzoni / five songs at briciole
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I am too, Frank. And yes, the result is delicious. The only thing remotely similar in Italian cuisine is the Jewish tradition of sfoglietti, about which I wrote in this article (with recipe): http://theweiserkitchen.com/sfoglietti-italian-pasta-meets-jewish-traditions/ Of course, the reason for drying the pasta is different. In terms of adding meat, I recommend you look at the recipe that inspired me http://www.mongolfood.info/en/recipes/tsuivan.html, which describes when to add meat.
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] Strands of pasta (tasalsan guril), purple cabbage and purple carrots The 21st country of our World Culinary ABC1 is Mongolia (Mongolia). In researching dishes from the country in the heart of Asia, I found out about tasalsan guril, fried noodles.2 These are short strands of pasta cut from a rolled sheet previously pan-fried. How could I not try to make them? And make them I did. I cooked the first batch in some of my homemade chicken broth and the resulting soup was excellent. I then read that tasalsan guril may be... Continue reading
Posted Dec 22, 2015 at briciole
Thank you, Amilcaremaria :)
Toggle Commented Dec 15, 2015 on shakshouka at briciole
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Gosh, I should have consulted with you Cathy. Crozets are originally from Savoie and probably have not yet been adopted by their neighbors on the north (Jura). I hope I'll visit the area on day: I am quite fond of the Alps and Alpine region (plus they have some awesome cheeses).
Toggle Commented Dec 6, 2015 on crozets at briciole
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Thank you, Paz. The richness of egg went well with the rustic texture of stone-ground buckwheat flour. My crozets definitely tasted different from regular egg pasta. They were a great company to the pieces of chicken that enriched the soup.
Toggle Commented Dec 6, 2015 on crozets at briciole
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Thank you, Wendy :)
Toggle Commented Dec 6, 2015 on crozets at briciole
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Grazie, Frank. This was a discovery I am glad I made. Yes, a cross between pizzoccheri and the quadrucci my mother and aunt made with cutouts after making tagliatelle. They are fun to make.
Toggle Commented Dec 4, 2015 on crozets at briciole
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