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Simona Carini
Northern California
An Italian transplanted in California
Interests: creative cooking, cheese making, bread baking, food writing, blogging, book and box making, kayaking, photography, classical music You can contact me at simosite [AT] mac [DOT] com
Recent Activity
Quando passi da queste parti te la faccio assaggiare ;)
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We are lucky to have easy access to good avocados: they seem to be able to bring up a notch any dish to which they are added. It is a really nice book and am now looking forward to reading more from the same author.
Toggle Commented Jul 8, 2016 on celery omelette / omelette con sedano at briciole
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Have you thought about growing it in your garden? I honestly have no idea how difficult it is to do so. Having to buy a large amount at a time makes one think about various ways of using it. It has happened to me in the past to discard celery that had become too old and I don't like that. I also like the idea of moving to the foreground a vegetable that is usually in the background.
Toggle Commented Jul 8, 2016 on celery omelette / omelette con sedano at briciole
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No worries, Deb. Thank you so much for participating!
Toggle Commented Jul 8, 2016 on Novel Food #27: the finale at briciole
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onion and ricotta tart in good company (tablecloth by La FABBRICA del LINO) In her memoir Unearthed: Love, Acceptance, and Other Lessons from an Abandoned Garden1 author Alexandra Risen2 tells two stories of discovery: one pertains the garden around the house into which she moves with her husband and young son and the other pertains her Ukrainian-born parents, who were displaced by WWII and finally migrated to Edmonton, Canada, in 1953. The book is a pleasure to read. Each chapter moves forward both the story of the garden's restoration / development and Risen's personal journey through her earlier life and her... Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2016 at briciole
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Welcome to the roundup of the 27th edition of Novel Food, the literary/culinary event that Lisa of Champaign Taste and I created in 2007 and that I continue to host with great pleasure, as it brings together two of my passions: literature and food. Novel Food is about literary works (prose or poetry) that inspire the preparation of dishes. Like all its predecessors, the current edition includes some lovely posts, each describing a literary work that the blogger read and the dish that the reading inspired. Please, follow me on a short literary/culinary tour. For each contribution, I will offer a... Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2016 at briciole
Now you got me curious, Ruhama. Any chance you can use the book for the next edition of Novel Food?
Toggle Commented Jun 23, 2016 on Announcing: Novel Food #27 at briciole
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So glad you found hemp seeds, Claudia. Let me know if you make the crackers and/or the cod.
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Thank you so much, Deb!
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2016 on Announcing: Novel Food #27 at briciole
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I agree, Frank, and that's why I am experimenting with it.
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2016 on celery omelette / omelette con sedano at briciole
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] celery omelette topped with some mashed avocado (tablecloth by La FABBRICA del LINO) Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson called out at me from a table at a library book sale and just like the country in which is it set, Norway, it grabbed me immediately. The sky, the woods, the water, everything is expansive in Norway, majestic, yet quiet. Petterson's prose is like that. Life's familiar themes—friendship, love, loss, betrayal, coming of age, aging—play a role in the story of Trond Sander, the 67-year-old protagonist. I imagined to be sitting in... Continue reading
Posted Jun 14, 2016 at briciole
I also was tempted by the chili, but then I would have had to host a party, since these days I am the only one eating beans at home. I would like to taste a bowl of yours!
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2016 on Midwest Beef & Beans Chili at Delaware Girl Eats
And you may discover you like them too, Cathy ;) They are quite tasty.
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Thank you, Amy :)
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You are welcome, Debra :)
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You are welcome, Wendy :)
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I know, Frank, the recipe sounds strange. The chia seeds, when placed in water, develop a gelatinous coating: when the other seeds are added, the mass still keeps together and that allows you to spread it into a thin sheet. I hope you give this recipe a try, especially if you are a fun of nuts. Let me know if you do.
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They are so quick and easy to make, Claudia, I totally recommend them. I noticed hemp seeds for the first time not too long ago in the supplement section of a Whole Foods, where I was looking for something else. Trader Joe's carries them, at least in the Bay Area, together with chia seeds. Both are quite nutritious and have become popular so I would also try any of the health food stores in the area.
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You are welcome, Deb. This book was a kind of opposite to the Pellegrini we read in the last edition and it was interesting for me to note that. Flinn and I are about the same age, and I honestly did not expect our experiences to have been so different. Having come to the US as an adult, I have often felt that not having grown up here makes a big difference and reading the book confirmed it. Yes, thanks also to your kind words on the subject, I decided to host another edition of Novel Food. Looking forward to reading what you contribute. Thanks!
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] cheese, seed crackers and red walnuts1 (table runner by La FABBRICA del LINO) Please, have your cake or pie and eat my portion too. I am happy with the small plate in the photo. The cheeses are (from the left): Garroxta (goat milk, Catalonia), my homemade Gouda with pecans, Blu di Caravaggio (buffalo milk, Italy; my favorite blue cheese). And the crackers are a perfect accompaniment for all of them. sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, chia and hemp seeds (semi di sesamo, di zucca, di girasole, di chia e di canapa) The current selection... Continue reading
Posted May 22, 2016 at briciole
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It's time to announce the spring edition of Novel Food, the culinary/literary event with a long history, going back to the fall of 2007. I am a passionate reader and therefore this event is close to my heart as it brings together two of my passions. Every edition of Novel Food is a little voyage of literary discovery and also a delightful banquet made up of the literary-inspired dishes contributed by the event's participants. I hope you will join the party. I am looking forward to learning about a published literary work (a novel, novella, short story, memoir, bio, poem, etc.)... Continue reading
Posted May 20, 2016 at briciole
Thank you, Frank. I had also never heard of them until recently. I found a trail-size package at Whole Foods and tried them. I like them a lot and have been using them in various recipe. This is one and I will soon share another.
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[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] sitting down to a nice lunch (table runner by La FABBRICA del LINO) As a child I didn't like fish, particularly fried fish (pesce fritto). On the other hand, I liked other fried food my mother made: breaded meat (cotoletta) or chicken breast, battered cauliflower florets, potato croquettes (crocchette di patate) and of course supplì (rice croquette). Later in life I learned to like fish. In general, I don't deep-fry in my kitchen, but I like the crisp crust (crosticina) foods acquire when breaded and fried. Baking breaded foods approximates the result... Continue reading
Posted May 6, 2016 at briciole
Thank you, Cathy. Indeed, and a good number of other things he wrote feel still valid. He was certainly an interesting person.
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They were a big hit here, Frank. Besides the quality and freshness of the meat, I think the trick is to have a balance of the flavoring ingredients. Let me know if you give them a try.
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