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Patricia Rice
The Notorious Atherton, August 2013
Recent Activity
I'm easily bored with veggies, so I'm always willing to experiment. We grew a tomato this year that came from one of the original plants grown here. It produced fruits larger than a cherry tomato but certainly nothing like our giant tomatoes today!
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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I can snuggle right up to the fireplace on a foggy day, enjoy the flames, and look out on my plumeria and palms and be quite content. Of course, I never bothered shoveling snow if there was any way of avoiding it when we lived back East. Our mailman left mail at the street and didn't need to deliver to our house!
Toggle Commented Nov 16, 2016 on Winter Delights at Word Wenches
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I have driven through Panhandle winters and been glad I could drive out of them again! that I actually survived to drive out of them. Staying home is definitely the best solution!
Toggle Commented Nov 16, 2016 on Winter Delights at Word Wenches
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Charlie Browns Christmas tree! Patricia Rice http://patriciarice.com
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I feel a blog coming on about what books we might recommend to help people "adjust" to stressors. There have to be thousands, and I'm thinking depressing literary tomes aren't what we'll come up with!
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I have no idea if we can Skype with our son in the Philippines, although we often travel and meet each other before the holiday, so we really haven't tried. It's a new tradition.
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Oh, I envy you your angels! We had to leave all our heirlooms and collections behind when we moved. Palm trees and Christmas ornaments simply don't go together so well anyway, but I miss those memories! Hugs on yours.
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Yes, we had the one gift tradition too--and it was always books. Kept the kids quiet on Christmas Eve.
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Oh, Janice, I hope not, although perhaps they'll gather for holiday traditions with close friends. But I love your story of the mungy Christmas tree and now I have ideas dancing in my head! I'd say watch out for a mungy tree in the next novella, but ideas have a way of turning up in strange places.
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Yes, I know the travel for holiday part, but it's so good to see family on holidays! It makes us who we are. I tried to get my family to exchange books when we got together, but the brothers prefer TV.
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Oh dear, I totally relate. My sin was raisins. Anything made with raisins would disappear before the holiday dinner. So when I had my own kitchen and family, I made everything I knew to include raisins--Waldorf salads, rice pudding, oatmeal-raisin cookies, fruitcake with raisins.... Not until the kids were adults did they tell me they hated raisins. Ungrateful little brats. Enjoy your trifle and brandy!
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LOL, Anne! Glad you've crawled out of your cave, but you're about as much of a partier as I am if that's all you can find to do. I just finished one rough draft and one revised draft and I'm--going to the dentist and doctor. Girls know how to have fun!
Toggle Commented Oct 26, 2016 on Finishing a book at Word Wenches
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Now that is an intriguing comment! I used to do a historical voice but it meant adding unnecessary clauses and using words that modern readers no longer recognize. I was often told readers needed a dictionary to read my books. So Ive been moving toward a more concise voice. But I do remember with great fondness the lush voices we used in the past. Patricia Rice http://patriciarice.com
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Arent the images just yummy? And yes, I love the big/little picture we can create in historicals! Patricia Rice http://patriciarice.com
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Woman's power is definitely part of this discussion. I just read a blog about women authors in times past (it also applies today!) who had to use a man's name to be taken seriously. As long as we have our historical heroines recognize the limitations of society, they can do anything!
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Never too late! Time-slip novels are a pretty cool way of letting the reader relate to a character, then sneaking them in the back door to our historical world.
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Bless you and everyone like you out there! Without readers, writers would spend all their time navel-gazing, wouldn't they?
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Yes, yes, exactly! So much more drama in costume.
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that's interesting that you grew up reading historical romance but turned to fantasy in writing. Of course, now that I think about it, I didn't even know historical romance existed outside of Austen until long after I'd left school. So maybe it's not so odd after all. I grew up reading mysteries and classics, and those reading habits haven't changed.
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Ohhh, you're so right, Sue! Now I must ponder that. What contemporaries today will make it to the historicals of tomorrow? Now there's a topic to drive us crazy!
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Yes, I think you were doomed from childhood. As we learned from another of our blogs, readers do tend to favor the types of books they read as young people. But oh, I envy you having the English countryside so you could actually see what I could only imagine at the time!
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Since a horse pulling a carriage could only go about ten miles without need of rest, our characters had lots of lovely opportunities to stop for tea in charmingly eccentric inns. But they probably wouldn't have gone far for stove blacking. I'm afraid publishers are responding to reader purchases by insisting on so much sex. We have to take the cycle to its end before we wear it out and start over. I'm hoping that will be soon because there isn't anything new a story can say about sex!
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Thank you, Roseanna! I love enthusiasm.
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I think because we know modern times so well, we know there are only so many possible outcomes--I think you're right. Historically, we have so many lovely unexpected choices!
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Huh, that's what I've been doing with my Family Genius mysteries--I've assigned them the year 2011 so the world stays static. I hadn't thought about deliberately writing in a particular contemporary year--wouldn't that eventually make them historicals?
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