This is Tricia's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Tricia's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Tricia
Hunter Valley, Australia
Learning to live better with less
Interests: simple living, sustainable living, conservation
Recent Activity
Image
Not everyone has the space for a backyard vegie garden. But most people will have the space to grow microgreens. A sunny windowsill or well-lit kitchen bench is all the space you need. Microgreens are packed with nutrients, can fit into the tiniest of spaces and are quick and easy to grow. Keen to grow my own microgreens, I asked urban micro farmer Elle Brown, from Newcastle Greens, for some tips. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at little eco footprints
Image
A healthy worm farm has so much to offer. Worm wee can be used as a liquid fertiliser. Their castings can be used to enrich your seed-raising mix or as a nutrient-rich soil conditioner. And handfuls of worms can be fed to your chooks as a high-protein treat. The healthier your farm, the faster your worms will reproduce and the more wee, castings and worms you can harvest. Continue reading
Posted Sep 1, 2014 at little eco footprints
I love that quote Bernadette. Especially the hard... is what makes it great. So true. Thank you for sharing.
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2014 on Simple living a selfish joy at little eco footprints
1 reply
I'm thankful today for rain. We've had a week of raining almost daily. It's lovely. Your apples look simply stunning. T x
Toggle Commented Aug 27, 2014 on Thankful Tuesday - 8.26.14 at Life With The Crew
Image
Worms are wonderful workers to have in your garden. They turn kitchen scraps into nourishing free fertiliser. A worm farm is an easy, kid-friendly do-it-yourself project. You can use a range of recycled containers, including styrofoam vegie boxes, an old bathtub, or my favourite – an old stand-alone laundry tub. I'm sharing how to make a worm farm in an old laundry tub. Continue reading
Posted Aug 26, 2014 at little eco footprints
I can totally relate Lucinda. My life is nowhere near as simple as I would like it to be either. I think for me the overwhelm at being so far from where I want to be reduced when I decided to accept that I need to focus on what I am doing rather than what Im not. I hope that makes sense. Some weeks I buy yoghurt. Some weeks I make it. Regarding what to get rid of first - I still have so much clutter to cull - but Im trying my best to keep our living spaces and bedrooms clear from clutter (and am slowly working my way though the junk room and shed bit by bit). Struggling to clear the clutter helps motivate me to not buy anything else to add to the clutter. Regarding what to drop from the social calender - thats a hard one - and due to my back injury weve had 5 weeks of saying no to everything. Its been a bit extreme - but Ive realised that good friends understand and its ok to miss out on things you really want to do. Regarding where I started - back when I was more formal about my approach - I started with food. I did an online ecological footprint calculator test. It told me that food was the greatest contributor to my ecological footprint. So initially I focused a lot on changing the food we ate because that was where I could make the most difference. I try and focus on only one change at a time. I stick with it until it becomes a habit - and then I move onto the next change. I remember being where you are now. Heading back to work after being home with a baby. I outsourced. I spent my money on peoples time rather than stuff. For example, I had a cleaner who was happy to clean using my green products. I also found switching to bulk buying saved me time. And buying from a local food coop also made it easier to source local food. As you can tell from my long response - your question is something Ive been thinking about a lot. How to simply simplify without making life harder. I wish I knew the answer...But I think we need to accept it isnt easy. As someone told me the other day Simple living should be called hard work. But its hard work that adds meaning to our lives.x
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on Simple living a selfish joy at little eco footprints
1 reply
Lucky you to have so much chickweed in your garden Marie. I hope youve been enjoying using it in the kitchen. t
1 reply
I havent tried that lotion. But it sounds GOOD. I love that someone is using chickweed and plantain in a commercially produced cream. It helps normalise the use of weeds. x
1 reply
They sound delicious Yvonne. The nettle and mushroom creamy pasta sauce sounds especially good. Thank you for sharing,
1 reply
Image
Concern for the environment is what initially motivated me to embrace the idea of voluntary simplicity. Overconsumption is killing our planet. By choosing to consume less, I choose to be kinder to our environment. These days, my motivations are more selfish. Environmental concerns are no longer the primary contributor to my desire to live simply. I’ve discovered that I like living with less. Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2014 at little eco footprints
Image
You may have been weeding chickweed from your garden lately. It is a common cool-season weed and is abundant right now. Removing this plant is like pulling out a patch of lettuce or spinach. Chickweed (Stellaria media) is tasty and nutritious. It is also easy to identify, making it safe for beginner foragers. Continue reading
Posted Aug 11, 2014 at little eco footprints
Lentil Shepard pie sounds unreal Jane. Have just added that to the meal plan :-) My hommus comes out as smooth as the bought stuff. I do cook my chickpeas until they are so soft they almost fall apart and also use lots of olive oil.
Toggle Commented Aug 6, 2014 on Frugal pantry pulses at little eco footprints
1 reply
It took me a while to get used to lunch box baking without nuts as well Zena. Beans are a great nutrient-rich high protein alternative for lunch boxes.
Toggle Commented Aug 6, 2014 on Frugal pantry pulses at little eco footprints
1 reply
I love that you sneak your family pulses too Kate :-) Thats why I like your lentil-ese recipe so much. Its hearty and similar to the meat version. Happy freezing. I find myself taking a container of beans out of the freezer automatically every day or so.
Toggle Commented Aug 5, 2014 on Frugal pantry pulses at little eco footprints
1 reply
Image
Pulses don’t get the attention they deserve. Dried beans, lentils and peas (collectively known as pulses) are super-nutritious, versatile and are one of the most effective ways to reduce your grocery bill. Continue reading
Posted Aug 5, 2014 at little eco footprints
10
Image
I recently enjoyed a meal that I had been planning for months. A meal made from ethical, frugal and sustainable meat that would have otherwise gone to waste. The slow-cooked stew was nourishing, delicious and proudly served to my family. The key ingredient? Roadkill kangaroo. Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2014 at little eco footprints
14
I like the sound of your walk Christie. I hope youve since made time for another (and another). Likewise, love to you all. x
1 reply
I can imagine your frustration at having TV sets playing when you are out for dinner. That is strange - and thankfully something I havent encountered. Thank you for including my post in your joyful reads. Im off to see what else you found joyful. T x
1 reply
Thank you Connie. I only recently came across the term contaminated time when I read Brigids book. The concept really resonated with me. I can see now that ALL my time as contaminated. Have a great week. T
1 reply
I imagine there are many of us Sasha that are far too overwhelmed. Ive slowly been unsubscribing from notifications as well and finally took the time to work how to stop my phone from beeping every time an email comes in. It makes such a difference doesnt it. Yes - the evil multi-tasking. Ive been trying to minimise that too. Likewise - Ive only just discovered your blog and can relate to much of what you write. Looks like we are on a similar journey. T x
1 reply
Image
We recently had a week where everything went wrong. The washing machine broke, our hot water system died, we ran out of gas, and to top it all off we ran out of water. A few years back, each one of these events alone would have been enough to leave me panicking. But this time was different. It seems living in a shed last year toughened us. I suspect that we are all a little tougher than we think we are – and realising that is a powerful thing. Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2014 at little eco footprints
Sounds like your holidays were wonderful Teresa. I like to think moments/weeks like that make up for the other times when Im distracted and overwhelmed. I call it love bombing. Thank you for your well wishes. Im getting there slowly.
1 reply
Yes - more hours would be lovely Renee - but I think you are right - wed probably fill them up and it would make no difference. Ive been noticing a similar theme in your writing (and listed two of your recent posts on my inspiring reads page). Well get there one day ;-) x
1 reply
I can relate Zena. Being on top of things makes me happy - but I need to accept that thats never going to happen. Enjoy that walk around the lake. The laundry can wait ;-)
1 reply
Thank you Kate - yes the universe works in mysterious ways. Despite the pain and frustration - Im grateful for the opportunity to have been forced to slow down. Now I just need to make sure I make some changes so that I can slow down without being forced to ;-)
1 reply