This is Brock's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Brock's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Brock
Recent Activity
Awesome. My Mom has also seen dramatic health improvements in the last year, so I know how seeing that just makes you all warm in inside. Just awesome. I wonder if the nerve pain was caused by chronic Omega-6 induced inflammation? I assume she's taking a fish oil supplement but keeping total PUFA under 4% of daily calories? Those seem to be the "magic" numbers.
Toggle Commented Jun 10, 2009 on Mom Rings In: "Amazing Results" at Free the Animal
1 reply
Don, Price didn't study every culture under the sun. There are many cultures around the world that consume rice as a staple and "manage" to express a healthy phenotype. Corn, wheat, and potatoes too. The Swiss and Gaelics were not unique in this respect. You should read McCarrison's work on nutrition in India for some examples. Another fun example (though I cannot find a free copy at the moment) is to compare the phentotype expression of the Pima Indians based on whether they're north or south of the Rio Grande. The ones in the USA get Federal "food assistance" and get processed breakfast cereals, Coca-Cola, white sugar, etc. and get what you'd expect. The ones south of the border eat a tradition diet (70-80% carbs, 8-12% fat, and 12-18% protein) of mostly corn and beans and are very healthy. As just one more example, if you have a copy of Good Calories, Bad Calories lying around, check out p.110 on the Zulu. Like the Pima they got less than 20% of their calories from fat, but only the sugar-eaters in the city expressed poor health. Unprocessed grains can still raise a population of warriors of such strength and fierceness that the very word "Zulu" is synonymous with that stereotype today. Lastly, as anecdotal evidence, I eat oatmeal, rice and the occasional sourdough leavened bread. My teeth are fine, even though I do not brush them. I even healed up five open calories just by dropping the sugar entirely, without dropping unprocessed starchy carbs.
Toggle Commented Jun 10, 2009 on Agitating The Experts at Free the Animal
1 reply
Don, You are certainly correct, but I'm not sure that describing a "between 12 and 55 times greater" rate of tooth decay really captures the cost/benefit ratio of total grain abstinence in today's society (which has a very high cost in terms of convenience and effort). Using Price's methodology a rate of 95% cavity-free health (such as the Swiss or Gaelics demonstrated) means that 1 tooth in 20 experiences 1 cavity at 1 point during 1 person's life (aka, 1~2 cavities per person per lifetime); which they went on to spontaneously and fully recover from without any dental medicine once any vitamin and mineral deficiencies were resolved. That's good enough for most folks I think. The Peruvian skulls studied by price lived a grain-free life and reached a point of dental health such that four out of five individuals never experienced any cavities at any point in their lives. That's amazing, but it seems to be a diminishing return to seek that level of health when you can get "95%" of the way there and still have your oatmeal, sourdough bread, brown or white rice, etc. if you choose to. That's all I'm saying. I think grains get a lot of grief from Paleo folks that they don't deserve. Properly prepared you can still have them, and getting that message out is important since you can reach the people who can't (and won't) live without their grains, legumes or starches. If you care about outreach, don't demonize what you don't have to.
Toggle Commented Jun 8, 2009 on Agitating The Experts at Free the Animal
1 reply
I noticed you mentioning "Getting off the grains." I would point out that Weston Price did not get his patients "off the grains" when he cured them of their dental problems. He got them off the sugar and replaced white flour products with a whole wheat gruel ground fresh that morning for maximum freshness. He then added the vitamin rich butter oil and cod liver oil for the K2, A and D supplementation. This is worth noting because the Sikhs and Hunza of northern India, who have excellent health in all respects, also eat a great deal of wheat and barley but grind it fresh and supplement with dairy products. This was documented by Sir Robert McCarrison, a contemporary of Weston Price, who lived in British India during the 1900-1930s time frame. He did extensive research on the nutrition of the people of India and did many incredibly interesting experiments on lab animals as well. Likewise, as Weston Price documented, the Swiss ate a great deal of rye and the Scots ate a great deal of oats, both without significant adverse consequences, as long as they got their vitamins and stayed off the white flour and sugar. Getting off grains entirely is possible, but it isn't necessary.
Toggle Commented Jun 8, 2009 on Agitating The Experts at Free the Animal
1 reply
I think my experience is relevant. I read Ray Audette's Neanderthin over ten years ago, but have been on and off the diet as I let things slip, and I gained weight too. I knew what I should have been doing, but didn't do it. This is a mental/emotional issue, not a knowledge issue. You're probably using the wrong motivational techniques to try to get yourself to comply with the program. Lots of people do that, and it ultimately backfires as surely as a Jenny Craig meal plan. My suggestion is that you get a good book on personal motivation. If you want some advice on that, I've read dozens and the hands-down best book on the subject I've come across is Awaken Your Strongest Self. I recommend it to everyone looking to adopt new habits. Also, once you've got your head in the game, do what works for you. If you need some carbs, there are "safe" carbs like sweet potatoes and fermented brown rice. Get used to making your own meals too, as eating out is really hard. I also recommend Matt Stone's 180 Degree Metabolism and 180 Degree Kitchen for really walking you through the process of changing "180 degrees" from normal American to healthy eater. There's great books.
Toggle Commented May 21, 2009 on A Reader Question at Free the Animal
1 reply
Whoa there Natalie, I was just commenting on the inference in the post that "carbs" are the source of hunger without being more specific as to the source of carbs. I know it's Gary Taubes' thesis that all carbs are bad, but the evidence does not support that. There are many cultures which enjoy a rich source of starchy carbs (rice, potatoes, corn, tubers and even wheat) without suffering from metabolic syndrome, excessive hunger or poor digestion. As for Asians and hunger: Have you seen Japanese portion sizes? If there's one thing they do not suffer from, it's excessive hunger. And their heart health is fine. All the symptoms of metabolic syndrome come together. I'm pretty sure the hunger your vegetarian diet induced was caused by the absence of good fats and proteins, not the presence of starchy (glucose-only) carbs. Sumo wrestlers are a really bad example of anything except Sumo wrestlers. They force-feed every day throughout their entire lives.
1 reply
In my experience it's not all carbs that cause the hunger problem you describe; just fructose (and doubly particularly, refined white sugar and HFCS). I think this is an evolutionary adaptation to gorge on fruit when you find it to store calories before the fruit rots and goes bad. It's an advantage to convert a time-sensitive resource (fruit) into a time-insensitive resource (body fat), particularly right before the lean times of fall and winter. I falsify your suggestion that carbs are the problem by pointing to all those rice-eating thin people in Asia. They didn't get fat until they got Coca-Cola. Caffeine, alchohol and refined flours play a role too.
1 reply
Zero sugar cubes - rice doesn't have fructose. Glucose can be absorbed by all tissues (as you know) and cultures that consume great quantities of white rice do not suffer from metabolic syndrome (as you should also know). Despite what Art De Vany says, I don't think there's anything wrong with it as long as your metabolism is healthy (i.e., not a Type 1 Diabetic like Art's wife or son).
Toggle Commented May 5, 2009 on Wild Alaskan Cod in Green Curry at Free the Animal
1 reply
Richard, Just FYI, I said that "No, I would not buy a streamlined version of your book" because that's not my style. I read your blog, Art De Vany, Taubes, Eades, Stephan and the original medical literature you guys link to because I want as much detail as possible. But I know plenty of people who have looked me in the eye and said "Whoa buddy, too much detail. Just tell me what to eat." I think there's a market for your book. But I think the readers of this blog may not be that market - we want the details. We'd probably be good people to recommend your book to their friends though. I've been waiting for Art to finish his book for YEARS just so I could buy it and give it to people. His loss if you publish first.
1 reply
Justin, Dr. William Davis has found that when you take the tablet form of D3 your blood levels of 25 (OH) D don't change very much. This is probably because D3 is fat soluble and your body can't absorb it well unless it's dissolved in an oil. But regardless - take the oil caps. That's how it reaches your blood stream.
Toggle Commented Mar 10, 2009 on Vitamin Supplements - Part Four at Free the Animal
1 reply
Unless you see something I don't, YouTube only offers the first two versions (normal or "HD") when I look at it. There's a third even higher res version which is what I uploaded at the above link.
1 reply
Fantastic. By the way, YouTube only shows two versions of that video stream on their website (an 8 MB "low fi" version and a 16 MB "HD" version). There's a third 720p 56 MB version on their servers though, which I suspect is the video that MovNat originally uploaded. I have shared it here. That link doesn't quite work yet (at 2:56 PM EST) as the video is still uploading, but it shouldn't take much longer. Probably in 15 minutes or so.
1 reply
The good news is that [Stephen] counts his integrity far above his ability to eventually command huge grants for studies. That's my feeling as well. And it saddens me that choice has to be made at this time. I think the world will come to Stephen in time though, in part because of his efforts.
1 reply
Depends on how you cook it. Done correctly, no. It improves the nutritional value. "Nourishing Traditions" by Sally Fallon may be of interest to you.
1 reply
I was just making a funny about the ambient air temperature. It was peanut buttery in August and September. Even a few days in November. I bought the big Nutiva jar from Amazon.com. Unfortunately though my wife is not a fan of the taste so I don't use it as often as I would like.
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2009 on King Fat at Free the Animal
1 reply
Maybe in California coconut oil is like peanut butter. In New Jersey it's more like candle wax.
Toggle Commented Feb 3, 2009 on King Fat at Free the Animal
1 reply
I assume that the difference between small and large LDL will be discussed tomorrow?
1 reply
I am still very confused by Dr. Cordain's position on fat, considering his knowledge of paleolithic people's (both ancient and recent) eating habits and level of health.
Toggle Commented Jan 13, 2009 on Vitamin Supplements - Part Three at Free the Animal
1 reply
Ah! Much better! I didn't realize you could turn them off. Thanks.
Toggle Commented Jan 9, 2009 on The "Experts" at Free the Animal
1 reply
Richard, Can we turn off those Snap Previews? They're really quite annoying. Sorry to say. Regards, Brock
Toggle Commented Jan 9, 2009 on The "Experts" at Free the Animal
1 reply
His secret is that he is competing in a much less competitive market. Libertarian punditry has many alternatives; rational discourse on fat-soluble vitamins - not so much.
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2009 on Only The Beginning at Free the Animal
1 reply
I will look at the links, but did they say why the dose recommendations were reduced?
1 reply
I've already donated because it is awesome (they certainly get my money over NPR), but it's also really frustrating at times if you disagree with the consensus on anything (or worse, disagree with a zealot with more free time than you). Any attempt to introduce a contradictory opinion often gets deleted before the day is out, even if the evidence is on your side. There are many examples of this happening. It's one of the reasons I like Knol and Squidoo - authorial power to at least get a word in edgewise.
Toggle Commented Dec 25, 2008 on A Suggested Christmas Gift at Free the Animal
1 reply
Well, it wasn't -just- reading the blog. :-) Weston Price's book had a lot to do with it too. :-) But you introduced me to Price and convinced me to buy the book, so there you have it. :)
1 reply
Not only does it make birth easier, it makes getting pregnant easier. As my wife and I found out last night. After three years of trying and just two months of reading Free The Animal and Whole Health Source. So thanks for that! :-) And Merry Christmas.
1 reply