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Ken D
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A "roaring bear" sculpture? Perhaps the theme would be more accurately reflected by a statue modeled on something like this. https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/ea/46/e2/ea46e232230bba98c360ff0ab830d5d1.jpg
Toggle Commented Apr 25, 2017 on Where's the Bear? at Credit Slips
I have dealt with this type of problem in Wisconsin once or twice by exempting a leasehold interest as a homestead. My recollection is that statutes or cases in many states support this, and very brief research leads me to believe that California does. Would not acquiring a leasehold, a/k/a renting and prepaying, be a useful workaround for many debtors holding proceeds but unable to obtain a purchase money mortgage?
Toggle Commented Dec 1, 2016 on Homestead Proceeds in Bankruptcy at Credit Slips
An even more commercially successful writer, J. K. Rowling, has expressed similar enlightened views. There ought to be a hall of fame for such folks.
Toggle Commented Jan 2, 2016 on 'Irving Berlin on Taxes' at Economist's View
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The key question for me about the largely impenetrable Second Amendment has always been, "What could the drafters have been trying to say that could not have been said much more simply, directly, and coherently?" The best answer have have ever heard is Professor Bogus' slave patrol theory. It is not a good, or plausible, answer to claim that the intention was to prohibit or severely restrict government regulation of firearms.
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I hereby adopt Professor Levitin's arbitration notice waiver above as my own. Kenneth J. Doran, Madison, Wisconsin.
Consumer creditors have very few lobbyists. Institutional creditors have so many that their viewpoint becomes obvious conventional wisdom inside the beltway. Certainly the Solicitor General has an interest in promoting wisdom.
You are right, that is a rare double, but it looks like the Fed has pulled it off.
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Sometimes once is enough, or even better. The "What is a Fact" URL was inadvertently entered twice, and 1x1=0. Try http://www.creditslips.org/creditslips/2006/11/what_is_a_fact.html
I have been fortunate enough not to have to deal with audits in my own cases, but anecdotal evidence indicates that many such findings would be disputed by the debtor as to materiality, or simply the accuracy of the auditor's characterization. There does not appear to be any useful mechanism to challenge such an accusation, unless a motion adverse to the debtor is filed. If anyone wants to pursue this, a trove of specifics could probably be turned up through NACBA.
As to searching more generally for the internet source(s) of a given document when you have a full or partial text, pick out a phrase or string that seems unusual, put it in quotes, and do a search. If there is a free version of a restricted document, that will generally turn it up. Going from an article stub to the full article is a main use for this technique but not the only one.
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I largely agree with you. I also think that Olbermann and Maddow have strikingly higher standards of factual and intellectual honesty than any conservatives with comparable platforms. I cannot imagine the MSMers ever acknowledging that in public.
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John-- How does your analysis of the hiring of Krugman and Olbermann account for Rachel Maddow?
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The conservatives' decades long work-the-ref campaign of promiscuously accusing the media of liberal bias has been spectacularly successful. The MSM lives in terror of it and has thoroughly internalized it. Professor Krugman's "Shape of the World: Opinions Differ" jibe is, unfortunately, barely an exaggeration.
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