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I don't believe that Ruby itself provides the necessary function to do this: if you get access to a method, you can determine its "arity" but not the names of arguments. The closest you could come is something like this: action :mymethods, [:a, :b] do end For bonus points, the action method could define the necessary route.
Toggle Commented Oct 27, 2010 on Rails no-brainer? at Graham Glass, etc.
re: "well-defined mapping for how to turn both sorts of object entries": just a thought... why only "both"? Would there be value in defining a mapping for mediaRSS and/or iTunes? Such usages might not be as esthetically clean or full function, but might be valuable as a transition aide. In any case, it goes without saying: any well defined extension with non-negligible deployment will get full support by the feed validator.
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A few random thoughts... MediaRSS has not had any active development for years. Heck, it took literally years to correct a simple bug (the namespace specified in the documentation was wrong). There is not just one standard for media extension in RSS, but two. The other is: http://www.apple.com/itunes/whatson/podcasts/specs.html Consumers will scrape from whatever source they can find. Good consumers will try harder. FriendFeed and Plaxo Pulse, for example, will quickly adapt -- if there is significant content out there for them to want to do so. My conclusion: this is not a case of if you build it (a better spec) they will come, but rather: if you address a pain point for producers, they will produce it. And if they produce it, the consumers will come. Writing up a better spec for a proper subset won't make it any easier for consumers, they will still have to deal with the full spec. And this means that you can't make things more detailed, as that would represent a change, and consumers would still have to deal with the potentially myriad ways the original and full spec can be interpreted.
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I suspect that most folks have "unexciting" reasons.
Commented Dec 14, 2008 on Money Where Mouth Is at Apparently.me.uk
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Perhaps a good place to start would be answering the question: not only why does *this* blog produce both Atom and RSS, but why does this blog advertise via autodiscovery links both feeds?
Toggle Commented Dec 14, 2008 on Why do sites still publish RSS? at Apparently.me.uk
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