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Fran
Umeå/Sweden or Berlin/Germany
Interests: Music Geophysics Cats
Recent Activity
hi wil, just finished reading your 2009 review, and i find it sort of reassuring that other people also get this brief "what i wanted to do/finish/manage this year"-blues on december 31st. i've just gotten over it for this year and will now turn to the pleasant part of the evening, which includes dinner, wine, and good friends (yeah, over here it is already that late). so: a happy new year to you and your family and THANK YOU for the good work and for sharing your stories with the world. i really mean it, and i hope that 2010 will be even better for you than 2009. i'm currently waiting for my copy of "memories of the future" which should arrive any day now (lulu says it shipped before christmas), and it'll make for a fantastic start of the new year. i'm really looking forward to it. (p.s.: oh, and thanks for sharing the one with the soup geyser! i remember a similar incident which included some red wine mousse thing i wanted to prepare for a couple of guests and that ended up with us re-painting the kitchen for two days ;-) i've been trying to avoid dishes that have the potential of transforming our kitchen into a desaster zone ever since. so, the dessert for today is WHITE mousse au chocolat - at least, that would match with the kitchen walls in a worst case scenario...
Toggle Commented Dec 31, 2009 on the 2009 year in review, part five at WWdN: In Exile
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time machine? i guess they're rather expensive to built, but there's this quite affordable concept called a vehicle heater. i learned to appreciate it in the two years i lived in northern scandinavia. when i first came there, i also wondered why parking lots were equipped with sockets. i'd never tried to start a car at -29 degrees celsius, so i got the point first after i'd had the pleasure to walk into a café in the middle of nowhere with a car battery in order to warm it up. the locals kindly told me about this other wonderful concept called, if i found the correct expression in my dictionary, a motor block heater. i doubt that those will ever be needed in l.a., though. but wait a minute - maybe they can be transformed into a time machine by reversing the polarity?!
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I'd love to hear more about your time in Nice and working on the movie, it sounds really interesting. You have a great way of describing how certain impressions make us think of something that was gone for a long while, so I really like your posts about remembering and memories. They would make a great book!
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Hi Wil, as for your community college class idea: If you have a bit of free time to do such a thing, you should absolutely go for it! I'm one hundred percent sure things like that must exist somewhere near you. About one year ago, I felt the same thing: After ten years in PR, communications and translation, I had forgotten lots of the knowledge I used to have in the natural sciences - although I've always been interested, especially in chemistry, geophysics and geology. Here in Europe, the community colleges suck, but most universities offer classes like the one you're dreaming of. They're normally there for people who intend to start an engineering or natural sciences program, but they're open for everyone. It's exactly the kind of update you mentioned, and you'd be really surprised how fast things come back to you, they're not actually "gone", but just sort of burried under lots of everyday information. Same applies to foreign languages, I thought my French (which I hadn't been using for years) was entirely "dead", so I went to a conversation class as well and discovered how much I actually remembered. It was a great experience, and as a contrast to my daily work with language and communication, I started to attend lectures in geological sciences after getting an update on math and chemistry basics. Learning things is fascinating, I can only recommend the ideal of "life-long learning" to everyone.
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yes, i am pro signed hardcover edition, and if you do it, i will convince someone to give it to me as a christmas present ;-) i love what i read on your blog but haven't purchased a copy so far because i wanted to "save" the book for the holidays. a signed special edition would be one more reason to look forward to that! don't know if you're interested in any international reviews for your collection, but if that's the case, have one in a scary foreign language (don't mention the war!) for the sake of completeness: http://www.motorhorst.de/texte_kommentar.php?id=1435 the short version is that this blogger (who writes on many nerd topics and who's doing very entertaining stage shows based on his blog) is enthusiastic about it and recommends it to everyone. he did something on your blog earlier this year and linked to your blog entry on the E4 campaign you did for nolan.
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I'm so sorry to hear about your wonderful dog and find it really difficult to come up with anything to say at all - as you said, it's like losing a family member, and I can't think of any way (or see any reason) to suppress the tears and grief. When I was twelve or so, my first cat just vanished one day. I put up pictures of him with my phone number on every street lantern in the neighborhood, with no result - and I never wanted to allow myself to cry and grief because it would've been like abandoning the last bit of hope that he might be alive somewhere. It wasn't until years later that my parents revealed the fact that we'd lived close to a crazy old freak who actually shot several cats because he wanted to "protect the birds". I cried for weeks because it seemed likely that my pet was among the victims, but in the end I'll never know for sure. All that's left to hope for is that he didn't suffer. I really, really can imagine how you feel, and I hope that maybe you CAN actually find some comfort in the fact that you were with Riley when she passed away, even if it doesn't feel like it now. She had a wonderful life with all of you, and you with her. Thanks for sharing your time with her with your readers, and my kindest regards and some virtual hugs to you, your family and Riley, may she rest in peace!
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Hi Wil, could you please do me a huge personal favor and ask Patrick Stewart if he maybe could do some more audiobooks next time you meet him him ? Like, let's say, the complete works of Edgar Allan Poe and Joseph Conrad, and maybe some of Sam Shepard's short stories to start with? Oh well, of course he could also read the telephone book, I'd still listen. Please. I'll totally buy you a beer if you do. Thank you very much. Seriously, thanks for honoring a fantastic actor. It sounds like you had a wonderful time together, and I loved to read this story about him. It was actually because of the Shakespeare scenes he did on Star Trek that I started to read Shakespeare at the age of thirteen. English isn't my native language, so it was a real challenge, but remembering how the words sounded from Patrick Stewart kept me going. I distinctly remember reading "The Tempest" one very hot summer in my parent's backyard, and going to the theater of the one horse town I grew up in to see it. I was so disappointed - I had pictured Patrick Stewart in the role of Prospero all the time while reading the play. I'd love to see him on stage one day, hope I'll get the chance!
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Your routine sounds an awful lot like mine. Did you ever try to write while another person's in the same room, on the other side of the table, also writing something? I used to do that together with my best friend when we were still university students and had to write loads and tons of papers. We'd sit opposite each other with our MacBooks - no, wait, it must have been iBooks then - take turns making more Latte Macchiato (or getting more beer from the fridge, depending on the time of the day), and we'd come up with fantastic ideas to enrich our essays ("how to include Schoedinger's cat in a discussion of Deleuze's time-image".) I still remember our professor asking in the oral exam, "Wait a second. I didn't quite get that cat part. Is it dead or alive?" As for goofing off online: One day we discovered this awesome M&M's dark movies hidden in a painting game - anybody around here know it? You have a large Rembrandt style painting and 50 horror movies hidden in it, which you have to find and identify. Well, we were into film studies, so we had a reputation to lose. We and some other students formed two teams and competed against each other. My friend and me won - we found out "The Wicker Man" approximately 2.2 seconds earlier than the other team. We won more beer and a serious problem with our prof because we handed in the paper two days after deadline. But it was one of my best writing experiences, ever. By the way: Deleuze sucks. Never get enrolled into a film theory class. And keep up the good writing.
Toggle Commented Jun 24, 2009 on time to write at WWdN: In Exile
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Hi Wil and everyone else, the three things I love most about this blog: politics, music, and pets. I remember your story about getting a new cat and the two other cats being horribly pissed about it. Well, guess who just agreed to take care of her best friend's cat while said friend's out of town working. (Hemingway! His name is friggin' HEMINGWAY! I prefer Faulkner, but it had to start with an H.). My own cat's not amused at all. They were chasing each other around the furniture all day long while I tried to work, and then they joined forces in peeing on the rug (the rug that tied the room together, yeah. Actually the rug my Swedish grandma-in-law spent one month making as a christmas gift for me and that can't be washed or dry-cleaned by any means.) Well, no more details. After feeding them both with their respective Royal Canin special diet (not that they would eat anything ordinary from the super market) and trying to clean up a bit I'm reading your blog and listening to my favorite ever playlist, featuring Wilco (a discovery I really owe to you), plus the Eels, Marcy Playground, Calexico, Lambchop and lots of other stuff I love - while watching the two cats who finally both fell asleep on the sofa, just inches from each other. Do you know how much you brighten up people's day with your great writing? Just wanted to say thank you for that. Keep us up to date on Ferris, Riley and everyone else in your household!
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2009 on an all too familiar scene at WWdN: In Exile
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That's so insanely fantastic. Just finished listening to it, and I really think it's the best one since YHF. Makes me even more excited about seeing them live for the very first time in Gothenburg this summer. And yes, I agree it's a really cool thing to be able to listen to the stream. These guys definitely rule! Greetings to Wilco fans everywhere in the world!
Toggle Commented May 17, 2009 on wilco (the stream) happens at WWdN: In Exile
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Thanks for the answer, I'm looking forward to that one. I've always been wondering if your books were going to be translated to any other languages. I'm a professional translator doing English to German with lots of nerd colleagues who are doing English to Swedish, and Sweden is really, how should I say...Geek Capital of Europe. So if you have any plans let us now, we'll so apply for the job ;-) Have fun writing more reviews and publishing that book, can't wait to read it!
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2009 on justice is served, edo-style! at WWdN: In Exile
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Hi Wil, are you planning on publishing all your TNG reviews in a book? I'd be the first to buy it, and as I can conclude from the other comments I'm not the only one. I haven't had time to read your blog in a while but started again recently, and am happy to find that I'm always in for a good laugh or something to think about whenever I come here. Keep up the good work, man!
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2009 on justice is served, edo-style! at WWdN: In Exile
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