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Which origami artist did you learn to fold from, out of curiosity?
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2011 on Eureka: Of Mites and Men at WWdN: In Exile
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If you make a 20 on the outer d20 (or otherwise make a critical hit), the inner d20 can be used to confirm the critical, in systems where that is necessary. Similar things happen on critical failures. It can also be used, as you said, for multiple attacks or skill checks (e.g. the ranger "twin strike" attack in D&D 4th.)
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We do something similar in my neck of the woods, with a large whiteboard. We draw the grid on the whiteboard, use colored markers or dice for players and creatures, and have a running list of initiative on the side. A bonus of this is you can write next to the initiative list status conditions characters/monsters have. So for example, "Monster X (13) Marked by Player Y / Quarry of Player Z / Bloodied" would be a monster with initiative 13 who is marked, quarried, and bloodied (Ouch!) Since status conditions can get pretty extensive, this makes keeping track a whole lot easier. Also, this means you can use as many or as few miniatures and map tiles as you own (lay tiles among the grid for difficult terrain or other notable things; use miniatures for players but not monsters; etc.)
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