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www.google.com/accounts/o8/id?id=AItOawkr5f0I9Q3FqRL9QkRy_GeQBUFPxBH1WXI
Recent Activity
I picked up the audio copy of Just A Geek (thanks for the discount! I made a follow up donation to the Humane Society of Pasadena.) and got the "thank you from Wil" via Lulu. I know this is gonna seem really stupid. But that email always gets me, a little bit. I mean, here's this person, whose writings and voice have become very important and meaningful to me. And he's thanking me for obtaining a copy of his works, which I love and move me are important to me? That seems ridiculous. The thanking should really be the other way around. So, thank you, Wil. Thanks for your voice, written, recorded, and however else it comes through. You make me chuckle, sob, and think, and feel delighted recognition and surprise in discovery. Thank you.
Toggle Commented Apr 6, 2010 on from the vault: april's fool at WWdN: In Exile
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I fortieth all the, I love Eureka, and it will only be better with Wil, comments! Who hoo!
Toggle Commented Apr 5, 2010 on Eureka! at WWdN: In Exile
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I'd really enjoy an episodic audio version of "Memories" although I already have a print copy. I have a bunch of TNG friends, and one way I would envision enjoying the audio version would be to play bits of it if we had everyone over to watch a few episodes, kind of like the "with commentary" setting on DVDs. The live performance would indeed distinguish it from the printed - and I think that, as you'd be likely to package each chapter individually, it might give you some greater exposure - for example, I have a friend I would buy a few chapters in particular for as a gift, who isn't a huge TNG fan but has seen a few episodes - he might not originally be interested in the whole book, but I could see him loving a few chapters, and then deciding to read even though he hasn't seen the show. Does that make sense? At any rate, my $.02 is that, as an end user, I'd love it, and I think many of my friends would, if you felt it was worth your time/money to do!
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Wil, FAN MAIL AHEAD: I just finished reading my copy of Memories of the Future. I had promised myself that I was going to read this book without making extraneous sounds. And I got through the first episiode recap just fine - learning the style, thinking about the criticisms, smiling at the snark. Then I hit the second one. By the fourth one, I had to put the book away because I was on the subway and people were starting to give me room on a crowded car because of my maniacal cackle. I'm still smiling about it. I wanted particularly to express my deep and undying admiration for your reference to "Ensign Ed Gruberman" - not only because that comment is what I think of every time I hear the word patience, but because I couldn't believe I was seeing such a reference in print. I actually smacked the subway pole in disbelief and said, out loud on the 6 train, "he knows about Ed Gruberman? God, I'm in love with Wil Wheaton." (This got my husband to agree to listen to the sketch.) Thanks so much.
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I love the quote - and I think coming to terms with what it says - not specifically as regards acting - is a big part of the growing-up process: learning to prioritize. I had spent my whole life, for a long time, working as hard as I could, as much as I could, simply in search of "security": a job that would pay me enough that I wouldn't have to be constantly scrounging; a paper trail that would "keep my options open" in terms of work and school records. Then one day I woke up and wondered what I was doing it all for - that, the way I was going, I was never going to reach an endpoint, and meantime, the life-time I had was passing without my feeling good about how I was spending it. I really had to think about the costs of the career path I'd started down and weigh them against the benefits. I think it can be a really hard thing to learn to do, to weight your own values and preferences sufficiently against received wisdom. But I think it's really crucial. And good for you, that you were able to do it!
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