This is www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1456357258's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1456357258's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1456357258
Recent Activity
The idea that freedom of expression was at stake in this situation is 100% wrong. Accusations of intolerance against people who have criticized someone's stated belief are baseless and illogical. Others above me have already expressed it better. I would simply add that I have observed the right wing co-opting the language of anti-discrimination to wield as a club against those who criticize them, as though their beliefs are just as immutable as ethnicity or gender. My response to this is that beliefs are the farthest thing from immutable. Beliefs are CHOSEN. Untrue or harmful beliefs MUST be criticized. To not express disagreement with people who are, to be blunt, WRONG, would be irresponsible of people who know better. To clarify: when I say "belief" I refer to a specific statement of an individual's position on a specific issue. I am not saying that discrimination against religion is okay. Religious discrimination, like racial discrimination, is judging a book by its cover. It's unfair. It is, however, completely legitimate to discriminate against an individual for a SPECIFIC statement of personal belief they have made, because then you're not making an assumption about what they believe. They've told you.
1 reply
Well said. But even if you were "just a kid" on that show, I must say I feel new empathy and respect for your professionalism then, now that they've released a 1080p still of Wesley's orange sweater and we can see more pixels of what you saw when you got to work in the morning. http://trekmovie.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/24080_STTNG_S1_Still_3_1080.jpg
1 reply
What freeway? Oh wait, that's L.A. Noire.
Toggle Commented Jun 4, 2011 on long line of cars at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
The same future culture that says people have better things to do than cure baldness says people who have hair must spend a lot of time sculpting it into an immovable, impregnable shell. Unless... there is a matter-energy thingie that does it automatically, like how Ilia's clothes are sprayed on when she turns off the shower. As this is Trek's only shower scene and the Ilia character happens to lack hair, we don't get to see how Starfleet's auto-bouffant technology works in concert with the auto-spandex feature. On the other hand, a first season scene asserts that Geordi does spend an awful lot of time shaving and adjusting his shaver for a desired level of subtle "human" imperfection.
1 reply
I await Seth MacFarlane's The Omega Man reference/retort.
1 reply
I'm delighted my childhood included being introduced to Flatland by Carl Sagan's Cosmos. Imagine a country where there were only four TV channels and Carl Sagan was on one of them, explaining science with words and images ordinary people could understand and even enjoy. That country existed. Was it a smarter, more enlightened country? Perhaps? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnURElCzGc0
1 reply
One nitpick of a synopsis detail, just because it clashes with one of my vivid memories of originally watching the episode: John de Lancie was actually wearing not a WWII uniform but a present-day U.S. Marine Corps officer's uniform, which for better or worse made it appear TNG was commenting upon Oliver North, who had just become infamous for his televised and newsmagazine-cover-making appearance wearing that very uniform to testify before Congress in the Iran-Contra investigation a couple months before TNG's premiere. In fact, Encounter at Farpoint completed filming 12 days before North's testimony so it's unlikely TNG's creative team could have anticipated the iconic impression North was going to make, but many reviewers and commenters assume to this day it was intentional parody of him.
1 reply
Mythbusters is repeating their NASA Moon Landing episode tonight, or one can read the wikipedia summary: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters_(2008_season)#Episode_104_.E2.80.93_.22NASA_Moon_Landing.22
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2009 on let's go to the moon at WWdN: In Exile
1 reply
"You know, I wasn't thrilled about working with a child, but working with you was a great pleasure." The fact that might as well have been something Picard said to Wesley is just another clue that TNG was perfectly cast. OT, the "four lights" clips in the Picard Song video make me wonder if a young John Yoo watched that episode, took notes, yet completely missed the point. Forced nudity, check. Stress positions, check. No waterboarding, but instead basically a subcutaneous taser, not unlike what today's police consider to be a "compliance tool". What a country.
1 reply
I like that it's left unsaid that William Daniels probably was not himself trapped 12 hours a day in a room with a two-way radio to play KITT for tourists at Universal Studios. I can enjoy the image.
1 reply
TNG from the outset seemed very conflicted about how children fit into the universe. On the one hand, we're supposed to see a brave, idealistic future where children and families fearlessly share the risk of space exploration and military deployment because of an overriding belief in family integrity being critical to individual achievement, a belief in personal autonomy and responsibility that is so strong that society recognizes a basic human right for spouses and children to be there, and where average children are intellectually advanced enough to be doing calculus as preteens. On the other hand, and predominantly, we see adults who are unfailing polite and tolerant of diverse peoples being condescending dicks to Wesley (and only Wesley). As for family, we never see enough of Wesley and Beverly's relationship to really get much out of it, but in what we do get it's never really clear that she is any influence on him or him on her. They just coexist. What is the point of having this premise and this relationship if nothing is done with it? It might have been interesting to see the first thing instead of the second thing.
1 reply
The next time I'm stuck in traffic with someone, I'm name-dropping Vasco de Gama. They'll probably think it's from Family Guy.
1 reply
I thought Parkay was the only talking spread.
1 reply
The question I have about Encounter at Farpoint, as well as all the other Trek-sequel series premieres, is, why? The original series never did a "how the crew came together for their first mission" story, it just started with everything in place and dared the audience to figure it out as it went along. NBC didn't even air the first episode first. When did it become obligatory to open with a two-hour story that's contrived to give every member of the regular cast a character-defining moment?
1 reply
I hope you can include your guest-star episodes somehow. I get the inconsistency if you include all episodes from the first three seasons then start skipping to just "yours", but your guest episodes were too memorable to leave out.
1 reply
Earthrise looks as cool in digital video as it did on film 40 years ago. It's weird to think that only a lunar-orbiting spacecraft can experience Earthrise. From the lunar surface, Earth would appear perpetually stationary in the sky due to the moon never turning its back on us. Literally Earth Day every day.
1 reply
If George Lucas ran Star Trek you might have been called back 10 years later to be rotoscoped over barrel-chested-blonde guy. Or even weirder they'd put your head on his body. Hide & Q SE, now on Blu-Ray and iTunes!
1 reply