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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
Wow. Kathy, that is amazing! You must have been a child musical prodigy. I've heard of children being able to do that. I love the sound of the Boar's Head festival! I wish we had something similar around here. I'd love a bit of medieval pageantry!
Toggle Commented 6 hours ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Constance. I've thoroughly enjoyed all the comments, recommendations and thoughts people have on the subject of Christmas music. I hope you enjoyed your concert. It sounds as though it would be wonderful!
Toggle Commented 6 hours ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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I'm sorry your voice isn't want it was, Annette. I have a similar problem! I do agree - music can be so emotional and is associated with so many of our feelings and memories. It's a very powerful thing.
Toggle Commented 6 hours ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Elizabeth. Will look forward to taking you up on that! A very Happy Christmas to everyone!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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I always wonder what it would be like to have Christmas in the summer, Jenny. One day I would love to visit Australia at this time of year just to see the contrast. We're so used to it being dark and cold here (or dark, wet and mild in the UK!) that it would be fascinating to see Christmas in a completely different way.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much, Quantum! I'm glad you enjoyed the blog. And I think everyone should be allowed to sing in the privacy of their own bathroom! The Holly and the Ivy is a lovely carol IMO.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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I totally agree, Janice! I can remember struggling through some very difficult and obscure carols a couple of years ago and I'm not sure the audience really appreciated our efforts! Certainly this year as an audience participant I loved joining in the well known stuff.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much, Anne. Really looking forward to playing these!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Yes, I agree the Christmas music starts way too early, Jikie. So Korean is one of the languages that Silent Night is sung in. Interesting!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thank you for the recommendation of Pentatonic, Heather. I will go in search of their music.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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That is another one for me to put on the list of carols to listen to, Shannon. I found myself singing Hark the Herald as I was walking the dog this morning!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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LOL, Mary Jo! I've just looked up Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer and am grateful that until now I was in happy ignorance of it! I am very impressed at your Latin version since all I know is Adeste Fidelis. No idea what comes next!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Haha, Elizabeth! Fun! And Jesus Christ the Apple Tree is another gorgeous one I remember from my choir days too.
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I'm so pleased to have discovered it, Madge!
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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I remember that one, Jo. I haven't heard it for years but it is very beautiful! The medieval carols always give me a frisson to think of how long we have been singing them.
Toggle Commented yesterday on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Hi Sylvia! Yes, that's the choir book we're using! I haven't cone across Now the Spring has come Again but I like the sound of it and will look it up! I love these memories we all have of carol singing! Until you mentioned the wassail and cider I'd forgotten that we used to have mulled wine and mince pies afterwards to warm up!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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How lovely that your choir goes around spreading the joy of Christmas, Samantha. We used to have carol singing here in our village but not in recent years and I really miss it! I love In the Bleak Midwinter too.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Artemisia. I don't know those carols and will be listening to a recording of them.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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LOL, Cara/Andrea! I don't think we're ever allowed to forget these things, are we! I'm sure it made perfect sense to you!
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Anne! I am wondering how many child choristers there are out there - quite a few of us, I imagine. That's a good point about welkin. It isn't as pretty as heaven and does rather sound like a cross between a sea creature and a medical condition! It's interesting about the power of carols, isn't it, and the fact that some can still make you choke up whatever circumstances you hear them under. They are very emotionally powerful.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on A Christmas Carol at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, talking about festive music. In the last week I’ve been to a couple of carol concerts and it’s been lovely. Nothing puts me more in the mood for Christmas than a carol concert, perhaps because I’ve sung in choirs since I was a small girl and so music and Christmas are inextricably linked for me. I vividly recall the Christmas candlelight services I went to with my grandparents (there’s something very beautiful about candlelight these days when so much of our lighting is very bright and harsh in comparison.) I also remember the mortifying experience one Christmas of... Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Word Wenches
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Joanna, any time you wish to venture into my bailiwick you are very welcome! A wonderful story about the iconic horse and its legends. BTW the Regency squire was Lord Craven of "my" Ashdown House. He owned White Horse Hill and his estate was centred on Uffington. Ashdown is only a couple of miles away as the horse gallops.
Toggle Commented Dec 5, 2014 on The Oldest White Horse on the Hill at Word Wenches
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Mary, I totally agree about the visceral intensity of the interaction with these monuments if they are not fenced in (or people are not shut out.) I'm happy to report that the Uffington White Horse is not shut away behind a fence but is still on the open hillside.
Toggle Commented Dec 5, 2014 on The Oldest White Horse on the Hill at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Michele. This has been such an interesting discussion. I hadn't heard of the Santa Lucia rolls and it would make perfect sense if home grown saffron was used in Scandinavian recipes.
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2014 on The Return of English Saffron at Word Wenches
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Jayne, the Sally Lunn buns sound delicious. I much prefer that recipe to the mackerel and saffron pate!
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2014 on The Return of English Saffron at Word Wenches
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