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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
Shelagh, you sound exactly like me! I have quite a romantic disposition but good old commonsense so often pulls me back! I thought Culloden was one of the most unhappy and desolate places I've ever been. It's important to experience these places but oh, the atmosphere.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jacobites! at Word Wenches
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It's amazing how many people don't realise that though, Anne, isn't it? I'm always surprised that a lot of people think George I had only a distant claim to the throne when in fact he was a direct descendant of James VI and I. Having researched and written about Elizabeth Stuart I have the impression she has been "lost" from history somewhat.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jacobites! at Word Wenches
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Yes, beneath the romance and the dashing reputation the Stuarts had pretty poor political judgement IMO! That to me is where history and legend diverge.
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Jacobites! at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I’m talking about an eccentric museum in the Scottish Highlands, a ruined castle, a monument and… The “Harry Potter” train! The thing that unites them all is the Jacobites. A couple of weeks ago, like Bonnie Prince Charlie, I made my way to the Scottish Highlands and enjoyed following in his footsteps around many of the places with connections to the Jacobite cause. (I also enjoyed seeing the wildlife, especially the pine marten in the picture which visited the bird table at the place we were staying!) I’ve always had a soft spot for the Stuart dynasty.... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Word Wenches
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It does seem appropriate, doesn't it, Anne!
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Nicola here. Today, as part of our Word Wench Blog 10th anniversary celebrations, we’re talking about what makes the Word Wenches such a special group to be a part of. Some of us are founder members of the blog and talk about the reasons it was set up in the first place and the ways in which it has grown and changed. Others, myself included, became Wenches along the way and joined a blog that continues to be dynamic, diverse, and fascinating, and a group of writers who are wonderfully insightful and supportive. Then there are our readers and regular... Continue reading
Posted Jun 8, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Crim. Con. is fascinating, isn't it, Sue, although I must say some of those cases made my blood boil! I got very agitated when I watched The Scandalous Lady W. To our society such appalling inequality of men and women is shocking.
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He sounds a total catch, Leslie!
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LOL, Lovely to have you visit us in any guise, Christina!
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Nicola here. Today I am delighted to welcome Christine Wells to the Word Wenches. Christine is a former corporate lawyer turned award-winning author of Regency historical romance and her beautifully written and emotionally poignant books have always been on my auto-buy list. You may imagine my excitement when I discovered that Christine was taking her writing in a new direction with The Wife's Tale, a sweeping novel set in the eighteenth century and the present. No spoilers here as I want everyone to discover and enjoy this fabulous book for themselves but I will say that The Wife's Tale is... Continue reading
Posted May 16, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today it is my very great pleasure to welcome bestselling author Sally Mackenzie to the Word Wench blog to talk about her new book, How to Manage a Marquess, which is released tomorrow! I first came across Sally's writing in her wonderful Naked Nobility series and I love the way that the humour in her books combines with poignancy and emotional depth. I enjoyed How to Manage a Marquess so much I went straight out and bought the rest of the Spinster House series and glommed on it. Sally, welcome to the Word Wenches! Please tell us a... Continue reading
Posted Apr 24, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Oh, productive procrastination is the best! Thanks for checking this out, Vicki. it's good to know but I am a little bit disappointed as well. The closet tax sounded such a convincing thing!
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much for the information on room taxes, Sue. Something else new and fascinating that I've learned! I must try and find out more... That idea goes very well with the UK window tax. The government can be very imaginative in order to get its hands on more money!
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Wonderful story, Jana! There's something so exciting about finding books like treasure in a special place!
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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A pleasure, Vicki! Thank you for sharing your family history - and furniture! I'm learning so much from this.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Vicki - that is so interesting. I love the different names given to the different pieces of furniture depending on where they came from and when. I had never heard of a chifferobe and see that it combines both hanging space and drawers. I have heard of a Davenport but was astonished when I looked it up to see it is the name of a furniture company from the Midwest that was adopted as a generic name for some furniture, sofas especially. Apparently the Davenport desk was different and originated in 18th century England. Who knew!!!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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That's very interesting, Mary Jo. I hadn't realised that the wardrobe was rare in the US. I just thought it was called a closet. Are they built in? I love learning these differences! Weren't the Catherine Gaskin books wonderful? A UK publisher is currently re-printing lot of these old favourites and my kindle is groaning as a result!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Wow, Mary, what a story about the pistols! I've never heard of a chifforobe - how interesting. I would have been enthralled to find such wonderful magazines too. What a treasure trove! Thanks so much for your comment!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I’m talking about wardrobes. This seems to fit rather nicely with Anne’s piece a couple of days ago about those unpleasant bugs that can hide in cupboards and drawers and eat your favourite clothes, and also with our recent AAR on lost treasures. Why wardrobes? Well, recently I was talking to an author and publisher about re-discovering the romance books of my youth. By youth I’m talking about the very first books I read that could be described as being romantic, before I devoured Georgette Heyer or Jilly Cooper. I was about twelve years old. They included... Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2016 at Word Wenches
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I'm so pleased you enjoyed it, Teresa. it is one of my favourites of hers. I also love At Dark of the Moon, The Jewelled Snuffbox and The Georgian Rake.
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I loved them too! Borrowed them from my grandmother and then scoured the library for others. They seemed so exotic to me as child in the 70s! Wonderful.
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Teresa, Lady of Hay is one of those iconic books, isn't it. I agree it's a stand out although I did enjoy Daughters of Fire as much and some of her others almost as much.
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Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.
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I'm delighted to discover this site with so many of my favourites, Janice, and "new" oldies to discover. Thank you!
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You are very welcome. Over the years I have thrown out a number of books, never thinking I might want to read them again. We need to open a lost treasures library!
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