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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
How wonderful that you did tours of the Governor's Palace at Williamsburg, Olivia. I would love to visit there! Good old Lady D - sounds as though a pineapple was the least she deserved!
Toggle Commented Jan 16, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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LOL, Shannon! Yes it is a rather odd looking fruit, isn't it! The great thing about the Pineapple at Dunmore is that you can visit it without staying there as the gardens belong to the National Trust for Scotland.
Toggle Commented Jan 16, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Mmm, delicious, Janice! Yes the fibre element is an added benefit.
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Yes, that's so true, Jenny. We have such a huge variety of fruit to choose from these days and available all the time. I rather like the idea of living at a time when the pineapple was marvelled over!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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How interesting about aluminium, Prema. This is one of hte things I love about the Word Wench blog - I learn such a lot! I haven't heard of the sapota and it sounds wonderful!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Thank you for the information on Lord Dunmore, Shannon. Clearly he was not an asset!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Thank you! I'm glad you found it an interesting blog!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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That sounds like a wonderful talent to have, Mary Jo! I think Lord Dunmore was A Liability! It sounds as though he caused quite a lot of trouble!
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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I didn't know about coconuts, Elinor. Thank you, I will read up on that. Some of these things were still exotic in the 20th century, weren't they. I remember avocados were the height of sophistication when I was a child and as for lychees...
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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How wonderful, Lillian! I love the idea of a festive pineapple flanked by oranges and lemons. They are such interesting visual items and as you say, smell lovely as well!
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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LOL, Vicki! I know what you mean about wanting to eat the whole thing yourself! When I visited Costa Rica I was blown away by how delicious the fruit tasted. I think I would eat a lot more of it if I lived somewhere like that. The mangoes in particular were so different from England where they are so often either under-ripe (and never ripen) or over-ripe because they have been travelling a while to get here!
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Cara! It's always fascinating to see the things that are adopted as status symbols, isn't it! I love that the pineapple also became a symbol of hospitality!
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Anne. I'd love to read more about the cultivation of the pineapple and other exotic fruits in English hothouses because it was such a popular thing to do and I'd be fascinated to taste homegrown fruits for myself. I expect Kew or one of the other big gardens could tell us. Another blog topic!
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2015 on The Exotic History of the Pineapple at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I am celebrating the history of the pineapple as a European sweet treat. The pineapple was one of the fruits that was first brought to Europe by Columbus and it quickly became an item of celebrity and curiosity. Although English horticulturalists tried to cultivate it, it was two hundred years before they were successful. As a result, in the seventeenth century the pineapple was both expensive and sought after, affordable only for royalty and the very rich. In a work of 1640, John Parkinson, Royal Botanist to Charles I, described the pineapple as: Scaly like an Artichoke... Continue reading
Posted Jan 14, 2015 at Word Wenches
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That's a very good point about 18th century chocolate, Nancy. I went back to read the original article to see whether it gave any clues as to how Monsieur Papilotte made his chocolate but unfortunately it didn't. I am going to have to follow that up now as I'd like to know!
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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I thought that would be the lovely creative sort of thing you would do, Anne! It's also prompted me to make some more. I enjoyed it very much.
Toggle Commented Jan 6, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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I'm glad you were able to find a way to eat those Godiva chocolate covered cherries, Constance. They sound divine!
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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I love a truffle, although I must admit I've never tried them with Beaujolais, Jackie.
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Anne! Have you made chocolates? We tried one Christmas and had lots of fun. Messy, though!
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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Oooh, delicious pastry! Very tempting, Mary Jo. I love raspberries too.
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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Haha! I like your cunning ruse, Jenny! I often wonder why the things that are bad for us are so often our favourites!
Toggle Commented Jan 5, 2015 on Chocolate Courtship at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, wishing you a very happy 10th day of Christmas! Today I am taking down my Christmas decorations and putting them away for another year. I read recently that we do the Christmas decorating thing the wrong way around – we put our decorations up too early and take them down too early too. Whereas our ancestors, knowing how dark and depressing the early days of January can be, kept on partying as long as possible! Anyway, here is a very sweet story, courtesy of the BBC, to celebrate the fact that we are still officially in the 12... Continue reading
Posted Jan 4, 2015 at Word Wenches
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I definitely think you have to have a ruthless streak to play chess, Karin!
Toggle Commented Dec 30, 2014 on Christmas Games at Word Wenches
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Haha! At least you can prove they are real words, Heather! I love learning new words too when I'm reading.
Toggle Commented Dec 29, 2014 on Christmas Games at Word Wenches
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Sue, that sounds the best game ever! We used to do the "holiday jigsaw" when we went to Scotland on the basis that there was always going to be the opportunity during bad weather. I think I might introduce the idea of the Christmas jigsaw into this house. It would be great to be able to find another puzzle like the one you had!
Toggle Commented Dec 29, 2014 on Christmas Games at Word Wenches
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