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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
I love the idea of trees having offspring that carry on the tradition, Sonya. It must have been amazing living in a place with so many historical and literary connections. Not sure I would have slept at night though with all those ghost stories!
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That is a very inspiring story, Shannon. I love that you were eating your peanut butter and jelly sandwiches whilst being inspired by the story of those intrepid travellers!
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Nicola here. Today I’m reflecting on the sorts of story ideas that catch our imagination. Last week on my way to the Romantic Novelists’ Association Conference I called in at Boscobel House in Shropshire to do a spot of research. Boscobel is the house where King Charles II hid from the Roundheads after his defeat at the Battle of Worcester in 1651. The story is very famous; hunted by Cromwell’s soldiers in the aftermath of the battle, Charles took refuge in an oak tree in the forest that surrounded Boscobel and he and his officer Captain William Careless (not the... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
Great post, Mary Jo, and so so true! I am very excited about the conference and have bought several new outfits and a gorgeous heart shaped necklace to wear to the RITAs. I will almost certainly over-pack in order to make sure I don't run out of clothes and will incur excess baggage costs as a result! I remember those Mary Kay ladies in Dallas. They were scary! I also remember a UK RNA conference that took place at the same venue as a meeting of parents of gifted and talented children. When you met up in the coffee cue people would ask if you were gifted and talented! What can one modestly answer to that?
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on Conference Clothing Concerns at Word Wenches
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Hi Nancy. Certainly I think that a great deal of London's water was taken from the Thames but not all. The water piped from the country was prized for its better quality. Liza Picard's book Dr Johnson's London gives some information on the water companies in the 18th century. I'm not sure how many there were by the Regency period. There is also an excellent article called "The New River" from the journal London Historians. It's a pdf file but if you search on New River Islington it should come up. I don't know about custom made toilet paper as opposed to old rags or the pages of books (!) I will see what I can find out!
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Thanks for the Terry Pratchett recommendation, Mary. I've read and enjoyed the Dark Assassin and now I will put Dodger on my list.
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Mary Jo! I imagine that a lot of places are still dependent of wells and that really does make you appreciate the value of water. Around here all the wells are fed by springs, many of which dry up in the summer. Even at Ashdown House there was no mains water or proper plumbing until the 1940s and we have the American troops to thank for that. Apparently it was the first thing they organised when they were billeted there in WWII!
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Crikey, that is a lot of frost, Jan. It's interesting that even these days there is a limited amount of stuff we can do to counteract the fierce force of mother nature.
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Hi Bona Yes, I too am a huge fan of the Roman efficiency in the use of water. Such a skilled system which I suppose was very important in all the hot countries they governed. Once they conquered Britain they were probably overwhelmed by the amount of water falling from above!
Toggle Commented Jul 6, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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That must have been very difficult, Arabella. Every time we have a power cut I realise all over again how fortunate we are to have these amenities running smoothly most of the time. Like you I love reading about history but the practicalities of only washing clothes once a week (or once a month) don't appeal. Nor does doing all the work by hand!
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Hi Sheila, yes I would imagine when you in a place like that you really need a good contingency plan!
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Yes, some things really don't change, do they, Beth, including outraged letters to the water companies and the disruption of work on the pipes! I was interested to hear about pipes made of porcelain. I would have thought they would crack more easily.
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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My goodness, Sylvia, you were impressively hardy, coping with those circumstances. Very interesting about the wooden water pipes. I guess they would be more efficient when bound with metal straps.
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Pat! Yes, lots of potential for stories there!
Toggle Commented Jul 5, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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That sounds an amazing sight, Shannon. I will put that on my must-see list. There is something magical about water caverns.
Toggle Commented Jul 4, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Thanks you, Pam! I was very impressed that they were so progressive on waste management and recycling from such an early time. We have gone backwards in that respect!
Toggle Commented Jul 4, 2014 on Water for London at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. On behalf of all the Wenches I’d like to wish all our US readers and friends a very Happy 4th July and indeed a happy day to everyone, wherever you are in the world! Wench reader Jeannette asks: “A question about the water supply in London. Was there a muncipal water supply for Mayfair back then? Surely they didn't have wells. Was the sanitation, even in the wealthy neighborhoods, quite bad? How did one dispose of "waste", for example? Did they have trash pickup?” All great questions and I am going to try and answer a few of... Continue reading
Posted Jul 4, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Hi Bona! Yes there was a wonderful choice of events to attend as part of the season - and still is - and I totally agree about waltzing! I only chose a handful of events to mention in the blog piece but both classical concerts and opera were also popular from the mid-Georgian period onwards. There was a programme on TV recently about how popular opera became in the Georgian period and how they would tempt rival divas over from Italy for the season. Might make a good blog piece on its own!
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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LOL, Louisa! Why not indeed? I've only been to the races a couple of times but it is very exciting, even for me and I didn't think I was a fan of racing! Not sure I have your stamina, though, to do all that and then go dancing in the evening!
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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I haven't found any reference to the "little season" as such, Mary Jo, but I think there was some validity in the idea of London being busy at that time of year because parliament was sitting. Since the social season was tied so closely to the political one, I think there would have been a lot going on in the autumn but perhaps not an "official" season as in the summer.
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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Hi Mary Jo! Yes, I didn't know about the site of the Chelsea Flower show either - a lovely bit of continuity!
Toggle Commented Jun 21, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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LOL, Janice, on the home from home! It does sound a blissful idea to skip the Season. It's very hot in London at the moment and much fresher out in the countryside.
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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That sounds a blast, Shannon. I would love to be taken shopping by someone from the Ton who knew all about fashion. Great idea!
Toggle Commented Jun 19, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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Yes, that was a very interesting programme, and some of the detail surprised me too. Both the dancing and the eating didn't quite accord with my idea of decorous behaviour but I suppose I was making assumptions about good manners. What is considered manners now and then has definitely changed!
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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I love dancing but like you, Isabelle, I would want to keep my cool. Exhibitions are the way to go!
Toggle Commented Jun 18, 2014 on The Season Then and Now at Word Wenches
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