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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
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Nicola here. Today it is my very great pleasure to welcome bestselling author Sally Mackenzie to the Word Wench blog to talk about her new book, How to Manage a Marquess, which is released tomorrow! I first came across Sally's writing in her wonderful Naked Nobility series and I love the way that the humour in her books combines with poignancy and emotional depth. I enjoyed How to Manage a Marquess so much I went straight out and bought the rest of the Spinster House series and glommed on it. Sally, welcome to the Word Wenches! Please tell us a... Continue reading
Posted Apr 24, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Oh, productive procrastination is the best! Thanks for checking this out, Vicki. it's good to know but I am a little bit disappointed as well. The closet tax sounded such a convincing thing!
Toggle Commented Apr 9, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much for the information on room taxes, Sue. Something else new and fascinating that I've learned! I must try and find out more... That idea goes very well with the UK window tax. The government can be very imaginative in order to get its hands on more money!
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Wonderful story, Jana! There's something so exciting about finding books like treasure in a special place!
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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A pleasure, Vicki! Thank you for sharing your family history - and furniture! I'm learning so much from this.
Toggle Commented Apr 8, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Vicki - that is so interesting. I love the different names given to the different pieces of furniture depending on where they came from and when. I had never heard of a chifferobe and see that it combines both hanging space and drawers. I have heard of a Davenport but was astonished when I looked it up to see it is the name of a furniture company from the Midwest that was adopted as a generic name for some furniture, sofas especially. Apparently the Davenport desk was different and originated in 18th century England. Who knew!!!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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That's very interesting, Mary Jo. I hadn't realised that the wardrobe was rare in the US. I just thought it was called a closet. Are they built in? I love learning these differences! Weren't the Catherine Gaskin books wonderful? A UK publisher is currently re-printing lot of these old favourites and my kindle is groaning as a result!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Wow, Mary, what a story about the pistols! I've never heard of a chifforobe - how interesting. I would have been enthralled to find such wonderful magazines too. What a treasure trove! Thanks so much for your comment!
Toggle Commented Apr 7, 2016 on Hidden in the wardrobe at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I’m talking about wardrobes. This seems to fit rather nicely with Anne’s piece a couple of days ago about those unpleasant bugs that can hide in cupboards and drawers and eat your favourite clothes, and also with our recent AAR on lost treasures. Why wardrobes? Well, recently I was talking to an author and publisher about re-discovering the romance books of my youth. By youth I’m talking about the very first books I read that could be described as being romantic, before I devoured Georgette Heyer or Jilly Cooper. I was about twelve years old. They included... Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2016 at Word Wenches
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I'm so pleased you enjoyed it, Teresa. it is one of my favourites of hers. I also love At Dark of the Moon, The Jewelled Snuffbox and The Georgian Rake.
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I loved them too! Borrowed them from my grandmother and then scoured the library for others. They seemed so exotic to me as child in the 70s! Wonderful.
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Teresa, Lady of Hay is one of those iconic books, isn't it. I agree it's a stand out although I did enjoy Daughters of Fire as much and some of her others almost as much.
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Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.
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I'm delighted to discover this site with so many of my favourites, Janice, and "new" oldies to discover. Thank you!
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You are very welcome. Over the years I have thrown out a number of books, never thinking I might want to read them again. We need to open a lost treasures library!
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Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh "Robin Hood" type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.
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Oh, I remember that one too. I haven't read it in years but will dig it out.
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Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?
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I'd heard that and have added her name to my list to check out.
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Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I've read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you're enjoying it!
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Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!
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That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down... Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly. I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.
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I'm so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That's something I've never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.
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Haha!How funny, Anne! Rocks and books sounds like a great combination to me!
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Hi HJ. I'm with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special. I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn't occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but "foreign" shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering! That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.
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