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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
Ha! Thank you, Cara/Andrea! Yes those Highland males are quite something!
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on A Land of Alpha Castles! at Word Wenches
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That might have been Lindisfarne Castle, Shannon? It's on an island that can only be reached via a causeway at low tide. On the day we went the tides were very high so even at a "safe" crossing time the water was lapping over the road. There is something terrifically romantic about a castle that can only be reached by boat or at low tide. I think there could be some very useful plot points around that.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on A Land of Alpha Castles! at Word Wenches
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Isn't it gorgeous, HJ? Such a stunning coastline.
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on A Land of Alpha Castles! at Word Wenches
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It is a stunning county isn't it, Margaret. I could quite happily live there. I'd love to be by the sea and surrounded by so much history!
Toggle Commented 5 days ago on A Land of Alpha Castles! at Word Wenches
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Nicola here and today I'm talking about alphas but in a slightly different way. I’ve recently come back from a trip to Northumberland, in the far north of England. Northumberland is a history-lover’s paradise. It has more castles than any other county in England. It’s past has been shaped by violence and conflict: Viking raids, Scottish incursions, battles and rebellion. I was staying in the village of Bamburgh, in the shadow of the iconic Bamburgh castle, once the seat of the Anglo Saxon Kings of Northumbria. I think of Northumberland as the land of ""alpha castles," big, strong and built... Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Word Wenches
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Another great example of Thomas Hardy's power with words. Thank you, Yvonne!
Toggle Commented Sep 26, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Oh, that's so sweet of your son, Lyn! Interesting that books can be so closely associated with phases of our lives and make an unforgettable impression as a result. Harry Potter is a great example.
Toggle Commented Sep 26, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Oh yes, the Mayor of Casterbridge! I know some of Hardy's books moved me to tears when I was younger too. Life in all its harshness can be a real shock when you are young and impressionable.
Toggle Commented Sep 26, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Thanks for your comment, Prema. Yes, more than one of the Wenches have written books that have made me reach for the tissues for the depth of emotion.
Toggle Commented Sep 26, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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I'm so pleased you enjoyed Milly's book, Cate. I've heard great things about it. High praise, especially if you don't usually cry at a book!
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Me too, Mary Jo! Self-sacrifice gets me every time!
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Susan. I love getting recommendations for books that get you emotionally involved.
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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I love that idea, Valerie, of following up those emotional moments with the HEA! Very satisfying.
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Oh yes! Carla Kelly's books always make me cry too, Shannon.
Toggle Commented Sep 25, 2014 on Crying over a good book! at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Last week I spent a day on writing retreat with a very good friend of mine, also a romance writer. Over lunch, we got chatting about the books that make us cry. We weren’t talking about those books that drive us to tears of frustration as we’re writing them although there are plenty of those. We were talking as readers about the scenes that can make us cry every time we read them, even though we know them back to front and word for word. Not all of our favourites were romance books although some of them were.... Continue reading
Posted Sep 23, 2014 at Word Wenches
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Yes, it definitely has dandyish overtones these days, doesn't it. I love the plain styles of the Regency cravats. I'd have been one of the people at the time who frowned upon the introduction of colours and patterns!
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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LOL, Anne, on your father disapproving of the cravat! Both my father-in-law and his brother were keen cravat wearers, both ex-military men.
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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An interesting thought, Mary. I'd give the cravat a go. I adore wearing scarves.
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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Yes, I never twigged the Cravat/Croatia link, Mary Jo! Perhaps it's better that they don't make a come back and leave us to look in appreciation on those gorgeous guys in Regency gear!
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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Fascinating, Shannon. Here too there is a very self-conscious dandyish style that involves a cravat. It's definitely a fashion "tribe" thing and you're right, if it became mainstream the cachet would be lost. It's such an interesting trend that is half-parody and yet still about swagger and the artistic aesthetic.
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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That's a very good point about beards and cravats, Shannon. Not a good look, IMO!
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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There would be a definite danger of swooning, Charlotte! Yes, I was just looking at my wedding pictures and thinking how good the guys would have looked in Regency style cravats.
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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Haha, so true about the underwear, Sonya! Although some men do still scrub up very smartly. Rupert Penry Jones as Wentworth is definitely a good advertisement for cravats and Regency style!
Toggle Commented Sep 8, 2014 on The Elegance of the Cravat at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, and today I’m talking about the cravat. Such an elegant part of a Regency gentleman’s attire. Cravat-wearing fell out of fashion in the late the 20th century when it became a synonymous with the sort of gin-quaffing, yacht-sailing, smooth-talking roles played by actors such as Roger Moore or David Niven. It became a bit of a parody and even a joke. Yet at the recent Edinburgh Festival one author at least was encouraging gentlemen to pick up their cravats again and wear them proudly. Nicholas Parsons said: "I've seen people with beautifully tailored jackets on, with an open... Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2014 at Word Wenches
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What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It's lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I'm not complaining!
Toggle Commented Sep 2, 2014 on Summer's Splendors at Word Wenches
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