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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
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Nicola here, and today I am musing on pillows. Repetitive strain injury is an occupational hazard of a writer’s life, or indeed anyone who uses a keyboard. It can affect people in all sorts of jobs who, as the words suggest, use the same movements frequently. In an attempt to deal with my RSI, which gives me neck, shoulder and back pain, I’ve taken all sorts of measures, trying to get my desk at the exact correct height and my chair as well, foot rests, wrist rests, and special pillows in bed at night to support my head. When I... Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. A couple of weeks ago I visited Portland, one of the most wild and remote parts of the UK. It lies off the south coast of the county of Dorset, opposite the famous seaside town of Weymouth and is a “tied island” connected to the mainland by a causeway. Back in the 18th and 19th centuries though the best way to approach was by boat and even that was very dangerous with the tides, currents, and lurking rock shoals that surround the island. The day we arrived was extremely stormy with the sea lashing the famous Chesil Beach... Continue reading
Posted Mar 1, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Thank you very much indeed to Melinda for being our guest on Word Wenches and congratulations to Kareni who has won a copy of Moonshadows! Thank you all for your comments - and enthusiasm for time travel!
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Nicola here. Today it is my very great pleasure to welcome Melinda Hammond back to the Word Wench blog. Melinda Hammond/Sarah Mallory is a long time Romantic Novelists’ Association friend and colleague of mine and we share the same taste in fast cars! She is also an award-winning author of Regency historicals. Today, however, we are chatting about her haunting timeslip novel Moonshadows, set in the Georgian period and the present day, originally published by Samhain and now re-issued by Melinda herself. I first read Moonshadows a number of years ago and found it a thought-provoking read as well as... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Hi Kathy, yes I also find that one of the most fascinating aspects of history, the fact that people discover others in their family were artists or actors or activists. That's one of the things I would love to know about my own ancestors; I don't know if anyone was a writer! But even in the UK it can be difficult to find the correct records once you get earlier than the first censuses, unless you can find a famous connection, of course.
Toggle Commented Feb 6, 2017 on Who Do We Think We Are? at Word Wenches
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I agree, Sonya. History and heritage are so important and special but I suspect that you, more than a great many people, have reason to cherish them. It seems to me a case of people not always realising how fortunate they are until something such as a programme like that puts it in front of them and makes them think. Whereas you have had a great many reasons to think about it in depth. I so like the fact that having been on the programme, a great many people realise how important their heritage is and it also makes a lot of viewers much more aware of their histories.
Toggle Commented Feb 6, 2017 on Who Do We Think We Are? at Word Wenches
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Anne, your story is the perfect example of why I love talking to people with Ashdown connections; there is so much detail you can add to our picture of the place in the past. It makes it come alive for us to know the names of people who lived and work there and also to hear what the place was like in those days. It's the sort of real stuff you can't get from the records!
Toggle Commented Feb 6, 2017 on Who Do We Think We Are? at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. I’ve been enjoying the current series of “Who Do You Think You Are” the BBC’s genealogy programme, very much. It’s been the usual mix of actors, singers and celebrities, each with a fascinating family history story to tell. Whether they find a royal connection, a shocking secret, a family tragedy or a black sheep ancestor, the subject matter has been very varied and interesting but what makes the programme for me is the response of the people involved. They all seem to have found it thought-provoking and have gone away different people as a result of delving into... Continue reading
Posted Feb 6, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Sue! The Wenches do indeed have some lovely books coming out this year. Exciting! I'm impressed by your learning goals for your new lap top. I am resolutely non-techy even though I should do better. My dh is the one in this house who LOVES reading the manuals. Like you, though, I'd love to have more time - and tools - for genealogy research. It's fascinating! Good luck with all your projects!
Toggle Commented Jan 16, 2017 on Ask A Wench - Plans for 2017! at Word Wenches
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Plans can be a wonderful thing. They can give us a shape and structure for the time ahead. At the same time we’re also all aware of the old saying “Man plans, God laughs.” The best laid plans, as Robert Burns pointed out, so often go awry. Today the Word Wenches are sharing some of their plans for 2017, writing and otherwise, and we’re asking you to tell us what you have lined up this year. Pat: If I actually stopped to think about my plans for 2017, I’d probably run screaming for the nearest margarita. But I’ve learned if... Continue reading
Posted Jan 16, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today is known as Epiphany, Three Kings Day or Twelfth Day. For many the date marks the end of the Christmas festivities, the day people take down their decorations if they haven't already done so the day before. It’s also the last of the Word Wench festive posts for this season as we head out into 2017! We’re lucky that these days we have artificial light to help us face the long, cold and dark days of winter. Candles and firelight may sound romantic but I imagine that if I was trying to read or write in that... Continue reading
Posted Jan 6, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Only a sleep from old to new Only a sleep from night to morn The new is but the old come true Each sunrise sees a new year born. By Helen Hunt Jackson Nicola here, wishing everyone a very happy 2017! January 1st has traditionally been a time to reflect on the year that has gone and the opportunities, hopes and dreams for the one that lies ahead. It’s a natural human instinct to be optimistic even if sometimes the world feels like a difficult place. Perhaps positive resolutions and hope in the future helps us to deal with that... Continue reading
Posted Jan 1, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, wishing everyone a very happy festive season! Last week I had a gorgeous time visiting Basildon Park, a stately home that has featured in many a costume drama from Downton Abbey to Pride and Prejudice. At this time of year many British historic houses are “dressed for Christmas” and you can wander through the rooms seeing how the inhabitants celebrated during eras gone by. Preparing the “big house” for Christmas is a major job. Often plans for Christmas are made in March, eight months ahead, and a huge band of staff and volunteers come together to set up... Continue reading
Posted Dec 23, 2016 at Word Wenches
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It's great that you have come across it at all! I hadn't heard of it. I think it had completely died out in the UK.
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2016 on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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Hi Oana-Maria! I have heard of the quince stew and haven't eaten that one but versions of it with other fruits. I will make that next week! My favourite quince recipe is a sort of French toast with quinces and cream which is delicious. I also love merillo, a quince paste, which we eat with cheese. Yum!
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2016 on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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Oh, that's very cool! Thanks for passing that on, Melinda, and do let us know if some skirret appears in your veg box!
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2016 on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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I've come to love kale through trying out veg boxes, Melinda. I think they are a wonderful thing. I love that you get new stuff to try and identify! Maybe they will slip in a bit of skirret and you'll be the only one who knows what it is. It should grow well in the Pennines!
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2016 on The Return of the Skirret at Word Wenches
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I love the sound of the Emily Gee book, and will look out for that, Kareni. Thank you!
Toggle Commented Dec 2, 2016 on What We're Reading in November! at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, and today I am talking about food, and in particular historic vegetables. If you look at old menus from hundreds of years ago – for a banquet at Hampton Court Palace for King Henry VIII, for example – there are plenty of dishes that might cause us to shudder. “Meat tile” anyone? It consists of chicken first simmered and then sautéed, served with a spicy sauce of crayfish tails, almonds and… toast. Then there are pies with songbirds in them, lampreys in sauce… It’s all a matter of taste. One thing I had not realised, however, was that... Continue reading
Posted Dec 2, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. I'm on a writing retreat in Wales at the moment so today, just for a bit of fun, I'm posting up a quiz. There’s a game that has been around for a few years that I absolutely love. It’s based on the idea of six degrees of separation; the theory that everyone in the world is a maximum of six steps away from each other so that a chain can be established to connect any two people. A while ago the BBC History magazine introduced a game called six degrees of historical separation – a challenge to see... Continue reading
Posted Nov 21, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, talking about odd historical phrases and sayings. The topic came to mind this week because I was reading an article about how the UK is awash with peculiar sayings and I’m sure that other countries and other languages are exactly the same. In fact many families share special phrases that have meaning only for them. Many of these have their roots in historical events. In our family, for instance, there are several sayings with Scots origins, reflecting my husband’s Scots roots. "Save your breath to cool your porridge" is one and, “There were bigger losses at Sheriffmuir” is... Continue reading
Posted Nov 11, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Today it’s my great pleasure to welcome author Charlotte Betts to the Word Wench blog. Charlotte is a multi-award-winning author of historical novels who describes herself as a daydreamer and a bookworm (so she’s in good company here) who lives in Hampshire in a C17th cottage in the woods. I first met Charlotte years ago as a fellow member of the Historical Novel Society and the Romantic Novelists’ Association. I love that she has written in different time periods and very different settings, from the Great Fire of London, to Revolutionary France to the Regency. Her books are full of... Continue reading
Posted Oct 28, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I am musing about life in the English village. So many of the historical romances I’ve read are set it cities such as London or Bath, or smaller towns like Brighton or Cheltenham. This makes sense. These places were the epicentres of activity in the Regency era, the venue for balls and other social events, a place where people might go for their health, for sea bathing or to take the spa waters. They were a good hunting ground for ladies looking to secure a titled husband, or for men seeking an heiress. It feels as though... Continue reading
Posted Oct 19, 2016 at Word Wenches
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Wow, what a great list, Kareni. Thank you! I really enjoyed Act Like It and I think it was a favourite book here on teh Wenches. Many thanks for the mention of Beth Elliot's book. She's a writing friend of mine and I really loved that book with its unusual background.
Toggle Commented Sep 30, 2016 on What We're Reading in September! at Word Wenches
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Oops! I thought I had included the author's name. Sorry about that, Frances! It's by Manda Scott who also wrote a series about Boudica.
Toggle Commented Sep 30, 2016 on What We're Reading in September! at Word Wenches
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