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Nicola Cornick
I write Regency historicals for Harlequin HQN Books and also work as a historian
Recent Activity
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Nicola here. Today I’m talking about wild animals and getting writing inspiration in the most unlikely places. A few weeks ago I went on holiday to Namibia in South West Africa. When I’m travelling I almost always end up wanting to write a book that involves some element of the place I’ve visited whether it be Scotland, the Arctic or the Sea of Cortes (still working on that pirate book!) However with Namibia I really didn’t expect to feel that way. This was going to be a holiday, pure and simple. Except of course that you can’t keep a writer’s... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Cara! Yes, they were fun to watch in the wild. They are very wary of humans (understandably when you think what happened to them!) so will run away very quickly if approached! I love the caricatures of plumes in Regency fashion but I know I couldn't carry it off myself!
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2015 on Fine Feathers, Fine Birds at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Anne! I'm so pleased you like the blog piece. I read that ostrich leather is the strongest leather there is so whether it was appropriate for gloves (or boots!) I'll have to check! As you know, I love your pink feather boa and you wear it very well - not everyone can carry off feathers with aplomb, I think!
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2015 on Fine Feathers, Fine Birds at Word Wenches
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Thank you for the link, Georgie. I love the article and she sounded to be an extraordinary woman, but what a terrible accident. It does illustrate perfectly the dangers of huge feathers!
Toggle Commented Jun 5, 2015 on Fine Feathers, Fine Birds at Word Wenches
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Nicola here! I’ve just returned from an amazing trip to Africa. Amongst the huge variety of wildlife we saw were these iconic birds – ostriches. I knew that in the Europe of the eighteenth and nineteenth century ostrich feathers were highly prized as fashion items but I had no idea that the demand had been so high that the ostrich almost went the way of the dodo and was hunted to near-extinction. These days most the wild ostriches in South West Africa are descended from domestic stock that were farmed to meet the huge demand. So today I thought I... Continue reading
Posted Jun 5, 2015 at Word Wenches
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You must come and visit again soon, Andrea!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Thanks for covering the blog for me, Anne. Much appreciated!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Glenda!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Oooh, I don't know, Sharon! I will check that out!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Tai! Yes, the legacy of people like Radcliffe is wonderful.
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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I didn't know that about the Radcliffe Camera, Mary Jo. How fascinating! And a great idea - it looks really good as a circular building!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Thanks so much, Annette! I'm glad you enjoyed it!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2015 on One Man's Legacy at Word Wenches
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Nicola here, talking today about the influence of Dr John Radcliffe on the beautiful city of Oxford. I’m fortunate enough to live only 20 miles from the “City of the dreaming spires” and I visit it as often as I can. The sense of history in Oxford is all pervasive and very inspiring and last month I had an extra-special treat; a tour of two of Oxford’s most iconic buildings, The Radcliffe Infirmary and the Radcliffe Observatory. Dr John Radcliffe was an English physician, politician and academic. He was born in 1652 in Yorkshire and educated at Oxford University from... Continue reading
Posted May 25, 2015 at Word Wenches
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Thank you so much for the link, Shannon. I've had a browse through the tapestries and they are stunning!
Toggle Commented May 7, 2015 on Telling Stories Through Tapestry at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Elinor. I've looked up the Nine Worthies series. I love discovering new tapestries! The Unicorn series really is remarkable for the vividness of the colours after so many centuries!
Toggle Commented May 6, 2015 on Telling Stories Through Tapestry at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Cara/Andrea! Yes, I thought you would be very appreciative of visual storytelling. As you say, it is astonishing how cleverly the artists convey all the nuances. Truly wonderful.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2015 on Telling Stories Through Tapestry at Word Wenches
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Thank you, HJ! Yes, I think it is a wonderful piece of work. I wasn't nearly accomplished enough to do Ashdown and the lady who ran the workshops took that on and made it look very pretty, I think. I've taken a look at the Lady and the Unicorn tapestries online and they are very beautiful. I love that they depict the five senses. How wonderful! Next time I visit Paris I will make a point of going to see them.
Toggle Commented May 6, 2015 on Telling Stories Through Tapestry at Word Wenches
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Nicola here. Today I’m talking about telling stories through tapestries as last weekend I went to the unveiling of our wonderful Parish Textile Map. I love story telling in all its shapes and forms, whether it is through words, paintings, music or any other medium and ever since I was a small child on a trip to France and saw the Bayeux Tapestry I have been entranced by the way that people used textiles as a way of telling a story. Most historic tapestries were luxury items, created in specialist workshops and used for both decoration and warmth. The first... Continue reading
Posted May 5, 2015 at Word Wenches
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I think if you have a favourite genre you will get drawn back hoping to find something that engages you. There are still "different" books out there in historical romance and it's good to hear about Erica Monroe. I will take a look at those.
Toggle Commented Apr 30, 2015 on What We're Reading in April at Word Wenches
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These are very interesting points you raise, Janice and Sonya. I don't read a lot of Regency historicals any more for exactly that reason. A lot of the tropes don't work for me at the moment so I stick to those authors I know will write something with more depth (as I perceive it). I don't think all the good writers are dead (!) but I do think that publisher pressure can be very inhibiting. I too hope that times will change as both an author and a reader.
Toggle Commented Apr 30, 2015 on What We're Reading in April at Word Wenches
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Fabulous post, Cara, and people have mentioned many of my favourites too, especially Jospehine Tey and Mary Stewart.
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Thank you both very much indeed!
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How beautiful, Laura! The coming of spring is very special.
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2015 on Simple Pleasures Then and Now at Word Wenches
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Thank you, Elizabeth. That is fascinating about lambs. I had no idea. I still love a cuddly lamb now and admit to being one of those adults who rather likes cuddly toys!
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2015 on Simple Pleasures Then and Now at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Rose! I am so glad you liked it!
Toggle Commented Apr 20, 2015 on Simple Pleasures Then and Now at Word Wenches
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