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Chuck
Avatar credit: Hidden Ocean 2005 Expedition: NOAA Office of Exploration
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by Chuck [Yesterday and the day before, we looked at the first two Rs of APA style, readability and replicability. Today, our short survey of the Rs concludes.] Third R: retrievability. Our third R is directly connected to the first,... Continue reading
Posted Nov 19, 2009 at APA Style Blog
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by Chuck [Yesterday, we looked at the first R of APA style, readability. Today, our short survey of the Rs continues.] Second R: replicability. The first place where you, as a writer of research articles, will deal with replicability is... Continue reading
Posted Nov 18, 2009 at APA Style Blog
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by Chuck No, not those three Rs. Readin’, ’ritin’, and ’rithmetic are important and all. But the three Rs I’m talking about are those especially pertinent to APA style. First R: readability. One of the goals of APA style is... Continue reading
Posted Nov 17, 2009 at APA Style Blog
Vicki: Thanks for your e-mail. Although APA style used to include the month, day, and year of retrieval in a “Retrieved from...” statement, that has changed with the advent of the sixth edition of the Publication Manual. At the end of Chapter 6, on p. 192, this instruction is given: “Do not included retrieval dates unless the source material may change over time (e.g., Wikis).” So, generally speaking, the manual now declares that most “Retrieved from...” statements do not have to include a date. I can’t really rule on the issue of your university choosing to include retrieval dates for magazines. First of all, I’m just a guy on the Internet. My word is not law—and some would say that’s a good thing. Second, institutions that use APA style frequently adapt it for their own purposes and reasons. The choice to include retrieval dates for magazine references may have an excellent pedagogical or institutional rationale behind it. (The situation is sort of like federal guidelines that states may follow as is or may make more strict or complex for their own purposes.)
Toggle Commented Nov 13, 2009 on The Generic Reference at APA Style Blog
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Keith: Thanks for your comment and questions. Regarding the use of “Retrieved from...” and “Available from...”, I can offer only counsel and suggestions. I work with the Publication Manual every day, but I didn’t draft it and, alas, I have no hotline to the style gods in the clouds to explain the intention behind particularly delphic directives. That said, here’s my take: Are the two phrases equally valid? Well, after a quick flip through the manual, it looks to me like “Retrieved from...” is heavily preferred. It’s used more than 30 times in examples and templates. “Available from...” crops up only twice, at Examples 40 (“Master’s thesis from a commercial database”) and 49 (“Video”). In both of these “Available from...” examples, the item cannot be obtained from the source/publisher for free; the thesis must be purchased from a commercial database and the video bought from its producer. So there’s an argument to be made that “Available from...” applies to commercial sources, while “Retrieved from...” concerns sources from which the referenced item is freely available. However, I personally don’t wish to make that argument, as I haven’t been through every “Retrieved from...” reference in the manual and checked online to ascertain that each and all are downloadable at no cost. This is not to say that the argument is incorrect. It’s just not the approach I personally would take. My approach is thus: The manual offers two ways to handle this situation. Both are acceptable. One is heavily favored, used 15 times more often than the other in the manual’s examples. So, generally, although I have the option of using “Available from...” in a reference entry, I most likely wouldn’t unless there was something about the particular entry that made “Available from...” seem more useful and/or accurate than “Retrieved from...”. Of course, this is only one person’s opinion. You went on to ask if using other phrases, such as “Located in...”, would be equally valid. If our standard is that the phrase must appear in the manual, I’m afraid not. If our standard is something else, the answer might differ, but clearly, we’d need to decide in advance what that alternate standard was before applying it. Finally, you asked about the extent of flexibility in regard to the reference template’s mention of “Accession or Order No.”, noting that subsequent examples use “Publication No.” and “UMI No.” I think that some confusion is arising here because of the template’s attempt to follow APA style with some rigor, by capitalizing “Accession No.” and “Order No.” because they are used before a number (per section 4.17, p. 103). The template’s point is that any accession or order number should be given. The examples go on to use the publisher’s own proper-noun designation for the kind of number. Thus, whatever name any publisher used before the number would be appropriate here. Analogous instances occurring in the references chapter of the manual include a generic “Report No.” in the template in section 7.03 (p. 205), “NIH Publication No.” in Example 31 (p. 205), “Research Report No.” in Example 33 (p. 206), “Issue Brief No.” in Example 35 (p. 206). The publisher’s or provider’s designation is what should be used in these instances. The manual does not rule that any such designation is more or less acceptable. I hope these thoughts of mine are helpful.
Toggle Commented Nov 13, 2009 on The Generic Reference at APA Style Blog
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by Chuck Whether you’re proofreading a finished reference list or trying to cobble together a citation for a new or nonroutine communications format, understanding what information any reference should contain will help you in your task. The Publication Manual of... Continue reading
Posted Nov 5, 2009 at APA Style Blog
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By Chuck “Is there any other point to which you would wish to draw my attention?” “To the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime.” “The dog did nothing in the nighttime.” “That was the curious incident,” remarked Sherlock... Continue reading
Posted Aug 6, 2009 at APA Style Blog