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Clint H
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AHHHHHHHH!!!! That makes sense ... I read too much into most things.
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I'm pretty weak in the math department, and in fact I happen to be in the middle of a refresher course in basic algebra for the first time in two decades. I'm also compulsive about certain things, so I'm desperately wanting to put your equation into slope-intercept form, which is y=mx+b. To do this, I'd have to write your equation as y=x+2m. Assuming that what you describe as m is the same m that appears as the coefficient of x in slope-intercept form, and if the coefficient of x in your equation is 1, then m must = 1. In that case, your equation is really y=x+2. All this to say, I don't know what that means, but I really wish I did.
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In my youth, news people would only get excited about weather unusual for their region. People in Chicago, where I live now, would got nuts for thunderstorms but be relatively calm about blizzards, for instance, while people in my native Kentucky would go nuts over an inch of snow while ignoring the occassional tornado. These days, though, everybody goes nuts for everything. There is never any reason to be calm, because whatever happens, the WORLD IS GOING TO END!!! And when it does end, you'll be screwed unless you have a gallon of milk in the fridge. A couple of summers ago, I swear, there were flashing road signs set up warning people that it was hot. We'ce all gone nuts.
Toggle Commented Jan 19, 2010 on moves by just like a paper boat at WWdN: In Exile
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You get this same sort of demographic disconnect in Chicago, where I live. A good example is Cabrini Green, the famed public housing complex featured in "Candyman" and the television show "Good Times." When I first moved to the city, I was shocked to find Cabrini Green was located only about a five-minute walk from the famed Miracle Mile, and was surrounded on its immediate borders with gentrified condos with prices approaching $1 million. Likewise, the famed view of the Wrigley Building stands over a maze of substreets filled this time of year with massive encampments of homeless. Cities by their very natures are collections of contradictions.
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As a lifelong writer of unpublished stories, I too have always found myself observing more than interacting, though I don't think I share the same cause-effect relationship others have discussed. I don't think I observe because I'm a writer. I write because I'm an observer. And I've never felt my tendency to be an observer has set me apart, as observation is itself a form of participation. When I look at the world around me and run through the narratives in my head, I feel just as engaged as I would were I just there watching. This is simply my way of processing information and immersing myself in the experience.
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A thought ... when it comes to jumpsuits and hair, you weren't the only one screwed by TNG's constume designers. Have you ever talked to Marina Sirtis about the stuff she had to wear? She really was far worse off than you in many instances.
Toggle Commented Dec 30, 2009 on the one with the Nanites at WWdN: In Exile
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One of the interesting things about this site for me is that we are the same age and, despite our vastly different lives, have many of the same backgrounds to memory. So while you were listening to Depeche Mode and filming Star Trek, I was listening to Depeche Mode and watching Star Trek. While you were hating your helmet hair, I was hating your helmet hair. It's interesting to see the point of view of someone my own age who was part of my cultural touchstones. In fact, I've often suspected that a very big downside to a life such as yours is that you can't have yourself as a cultural touchstone. So what equates for you? As for the one with the Nanites, I've always placed it in one of my top 10 TNG episodes. In many ways, it served as a watershed moment for the series. The uniforms were improved, McFadden was back for good, Wesley was flirting with the idea of failure rather than constant perfection, and was developing a personality. The episode also captures a certain shift in style and pacing that I absolutely loved. Oh, and Blackhawks rule.
Toggle Commented Dec 29, 2009 on the one with the Nanites at WWdN: In Exile
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I made a not-necessarily conscious decision in my 20s that instead of focusing on things like a career and retirement plans and an expensive car or house payments, I would focus mostly on cheap road trips. Thanks to this decision, I have only enough money to be comfortable (which is to say, I have enough money) and a ton of moments like this one you describe stored in my memory. For instance: After a night spent sleeping at a northern Arizona rest stop, I watched a silent sunrise alone at the entrance to Meteor Crater. I climbed the cliffs next to the Portland Head Lighthouse in Maine on a frigid day in beauitiful late-afternoon light as winter waves raged below. I stood on the Continental Divide at Loveland Pass, Colorado in the middle of a driving rain and watched water begin its journey toward two oceans. I climbed the mountains at Polychrome Pass in Denali National Park and watched rays of golden light shine through dark clouds over a vast plain where a distant grizzly walked. I hiked a 40-mile trail in Michigan's upper peninsula. I've walked windblown beaches on stormy days in Georgia, Maine, California. I saw a full moon shine on the tops of clouds from Hawaii's Mauna Kea. I've canoed peaceful rivers in Kentucky. I've walked through Chicago neighborhoods in a 3 a.m. blizzard. I stared down a moose from 20 feet along Alaska's Glenn Highway, saw elk fight a mere hundred feet from me in the meadows of Rocky Mountain National and watched two more elk play in the snow fields near the summit of Longs Peak. I've been to every state and a few Canadian provinces, seen every corner of the country, and I wouldn't trade a moment of it for something so transitory as a healthy 401k. I've been very lucky, yes, but I think I made the better bargain.
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