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Jeffrey Bridgman
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"Cut-through traffic is bad!!" wouldn't be a probably if the street network wasn't so disconnected in the first place ;) If there are lots of connections, then traffic won't all funnel through one place.
Toggle Commented Mar 12, 2015 on Disconnectivity, illustrated at Austin Contrarian
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Bravo, Jarrett!
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2014 on race, racism, and transit planning at Human Transit
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The picture makes it look like the streetcar is stuck behind that car... oops. Of recent streetcar plans I'm much more impressed with Kansas City's straight line: http://lightrailnow.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/kansas-city-another-new-downtown-streetcar-project-starts-to-take-shape/
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Maybe someday we'll have paint that can changes color available at a reasonable price... then you can just put a stripe along the side of the bus and change its color when you change routes ;)
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It was exciting to see so many people interested in transit show up. Ed Shadid made an interesting point about OKC's streetcar having no plan for covering operation costs, which would likely get pirated away from the buses, and would probably end up in court as a Title 6 violation. Also, unlike other urban cores where the investment in downtown is captured through property taxes, OKC *only* has sales tax for revenue, so there's no way to capture the value the downtown streetcar generates to help pay for the operation costs... So even the economic argument for a streetcar fails pretty significantly in OKC.
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Huh, it's strange that they don't have the tram (NET) on there... it's operates frequent service.
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Oh dear... Works great if you don't have a schedule or ever *need* to be anywhere... not useful if you just need to get from A -> B in the minimal amount of waste to your life. Sure, a beer is nice, but do you wants to do that every time you need to get somewhere?
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So if it's cheaper to buy tons of bubble-wrap, we can deploy that instead of more service? Bubble-wrap doesn't need any benefits, retirement, or insurance, ya know ;)
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@Ntrain87: Unfortunately bus has such a bad name in America that I'm not entirely sure you could convince cities to provide a separate ROW unless you are going with rail... even then it will be a tough fight.
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Awesome! I'm jealous ;) I hope the full plan gets put in place!
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It made me laugh :) If it can make people laugh, it might be good enough to give them some good will... maybe a little less frustration the next time they're stopped waiting behind a bus letting people off and on (although that might not happen, as the commercial suggest they have bus lanes).
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SDV = PRT without a guideway? hehe ;)
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I wonder if things like ant colonies, blood, etc., really work more as an analogy of automobile transportation systems? There's no grouping: each ant and each blood cell is like a car, each with its own path and destination In that sense, they better models road hierarchy (local street, collecter, arterial, etc).
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I found that this game encouraged loops... rather than a trunk down a main avenue, it seemed to work better (from a coverage/cost viewpoint), to offer loops that would lead to a metro station.... that really made all my networks feel unrealistic.
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Man, I'd love to get that internship... unfortunately, I'm an all ready employed computer science graduate in the south. Probably wouldn't work out ;)
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The 1993 accident... was it a weekday or weekend. I think this could make some difference and I'm having trouble finding the information.
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But if the bulk of the cost is associated with providing peak service for students, how is "giving away" free rides during off-peak periods a problem? The buses will run anyway... Or rephrased: Will transit passes only for the school commute cost more than an all-day pass? If the primary extra cost lies in providing extra drivers/buses during the peak hour, then practically speaking, the off-peak trips cost nothing beyond what is already spent.
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Sorry for the long links, but considering it is in a foreign language, I'll link to specific images. This is a sign on the side of the bus, near the door you get on, that has the major destinations along the line: http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%95%E3%82%A1%E3%82%A4%E3%83%AB:Bus_houkoumaku_yoko.jpg Another example: http://blogimg.goo.ne.jp/user_image/04/b4/d6c55d7fe9eb1e2b89c6bdad447c239b.jpg Here, you can see an analog version of the sign on the side of the bus: http://pds.exblog.jp/pds/1/201102/26/49/a0189549_848285.jpg
Toggle Commented May 6, 2011 on bus signage can be beautiful at Human Transit
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Perhaps LRT allows for potential for integration with the exist rail system in a way BRT wouldn't?
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Inkscape is good. I have access to Adobe Illustrator which I'm using right now to work on a subway map for Tokyo. It has awesome things like the ability to automatically round corners, etc. I can draw two lines and have then meet a sharp angle and it will round it for me so it looks all professional like :D Sample: http://tinyurl.com/2d574d7
Toggle Commented Nov 30, 2010 on melbourne: a frequent network map at Human Transit
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Are taxi prices by distance or time.... if there's a time element, being able to take Broadway to a popular destination could make the trip longer, translating into more revenue for taxi drivers. If the traffic flow is improved, the trip takes less time, and therefore less income for the drivers... maybe?
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Airport cul-de-sacs... Which makes high speed rail with stops at airports interesting because they will be on the way.
Toggle Commented Oct 24, 2010 on midweek quickies at Human Transit
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Drawing frequent network maps for the all cities near me easy.... a blank map! ;) (greetings from Arkansas)
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@J Numbered group system like that are used in Austin, TX... and I think it's a good idea :) Here's Austin's number scheme: 1-99: Local service (frequent and non-frequent) 100-199: Flyer service (peak, limited stop) 200-299: Feeder service 300-399: Crosstown service 400-499: 'Special' service (including night buses) 900-999: Express service (non-stop suburb <> downtown)
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"No traffic signal should ever give cars a green light without simultaneously giving pedestrians going the same direction a walk signal." I agree. I have no idea where the push the button concept ever came from. The only usefulness I can see in it, is if it makes the green cycle longer for people with physical difficulties in crossing. As for the bus lanes. What happens if a bus gets stalled in the road? Physical separation scares me because of the potential of a traffic jam occurring in the bus lane itself, and no way to get around it. See linked picture below: http://www.lightrailnow.org/images02/brb-bus-busjam4-20080909_James-Saunders.jpg However, the physical separation for the bus lanes in Paris look low enough that a bus could probably cross it if it was stuck behind another bus. Good call on that one Paris! :)
Toggle Commented Jul 13, 2010 on paris: the street is ours! at Human Transit
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