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Stefanie
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by Stefanie Sitting here in the offices of APA, we APA Style experts find it easy to forget that not everyone uses or chats about APA Style every day of the week. Therefore, it is not surprising that sometimes we... Continue reading
Posted Oct 8, 2014 at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Either one is fine, according to Webster’s. (I am speaking about the phrase in question—Rooster is better trained than that and I would be very disappointed in him for not finding a better place to go.)
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! Your reference would be for the YouTube video. In the text, you can explain what the video was about and where in the video any direct quotes came from. If the direct quote is from the essay being read, you treat the video as a secondary source (see http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/05/secondary-sources-aka-how-to-cite-a-source-you-found-in-another-source.html for more information). You can also find more information on citing direct quotations from videos (by using timestamps) here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/01/timestamps-for-audiovisual-materials-in-apa-style.html I hope this helps!
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Yes, you've got it: Use the semicolon before the citation, and the citation location is fine.
Toggle Commented Aug 21, 2014 on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Assuming your paper is being written in English, yes, please include English translations! The translations, as with other references, can go in brackets after the original Spanish titles. Thank you for your question!
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2014 on Apples to תפוּחים at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your questions! First, VERBI is the author and can be treated as such. Second, Google Translate (https://translate.google.com/) is very helpful when trying to figure out foreign phrases. Consult. Sozialforschung GmbH translates to Consult. Social Research, according to this site. I have looked at the MaxQDA website, and although their citation style is not entirely like ours, it does appear that they want the full name of the company, VERBI Software Consult. Sozialforschung GmbH, to be used (http://www.maxqda.com/support/faq, FAQ 13). On the basis of this information, the reference should look something like this: VERBI Software Consult. Sozialforschung GmbH. (2012). MAXQDAplus (Version 11) [Computer software]. Berlin, Germany: Author.
Toggle Commented Aug 6, 2014 on Apples to תפוּחים at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! Usually the way we at APA think about citations and references is that once you use a source, then you provide a citation and reference for that source (rather than choosing sources on the basis of the source’s future citation). It is possible to provide a citation for just about anything. So, from the point of view of APA Style, the sky is the limit for what you can use in an experiment, so long as it is properly credited. Your professor or institutional review board would have more to say about whether you can use your chosen YouTube video in an experiment. If you have any questions about the copyright issues involved with YouTube videos (depending on what your experiment entails), YouTube has an extensive copyright section with more information (https://www.youtube.com/yt/copyright/). I hope this helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! Yes, use the standard author–year format, but also add the time the quoted material is heard in the video. The following blog post will help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wwi8ZD3n8V8. You can mention the speaker’s identity in the text, but the author–year format needs to provide the reference information. I hope this helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! You can cite the video you watched, even if it’s a reposting.
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! Your reference list should include all sources used when creating an article or paper; therefore, sources used in or for a table, which is part of the article or paper, should be cited in the table or table note as well as in the reference list. I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Jun 3, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! My initial thought, especially given the extensive number of videos available on The Lizzie Bennet Diaries channel (much less the follow-up series channel!), would be to generally refer readers to the channel in text, as you would a general website. For example, “Each episode of the first series of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries is available on a dedicated YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/LizzieBennet).“ Then, if you refer to material from specific episodes in your text, create references for those specific episodes following the examples on this page. I hope this helps!
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! The question I have for you is, how will readers retrieve the information that you are referencing? It sounds like maybe you’ve had the data for so long you’ve lost track of the source. If so, and especially if you refer to it often, I’d put some effort into tracking down its origin. If you have a title or a key passage, it may be worth plugging into a search engine to see what comes back—the original source may be only a quick search away. Once you know where the information came from, you can take steps to create a reference for it. I hope this helps!
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by Stefanie Abstracts have been addressed on the APA Style blog before (twice, in fact, and very well both times—do give them a read or reread!). The following is a humble contribution to the literature on APA Style abstracts that... Continue reading
Posted Apr 18, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Thank you for your excellent question! Yes, that is allowed; just define the dash in the table note as representing 0%.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Typepad HTML Email Thank you for your question! A few strategies to try include checking the reference list of the source to see if that author has referred to works he or she has previously written and seeing how the name is treated there; if the source itself has running heads that include the author’s last name, such as APA journals, see what part of the name appears in the running head; do a search (either on a general search engine or in a database [or both!]) to see how the author’s name appears in other sources or on his or her CV; or check the author’s affiliated university or business website to see how the name appears there. If no other references or sources of comparison are found, make your best guess. I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Apr 15, 2014 on Apples to תפוּחים at APA Style Blog
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by Stefanie Here is my dog. His name is Rooster. Rooster is a grammatical dog, and he is going to help me illustrate the difference between lay and lie. Lay down, Rooster! Hmm, he doesn’t seem to have done anything.... Continue reading
Posted Apr 10, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Thank you for your question! The beginning of the answer can be found here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2009/07/why-isnt-apa-style-applied-to-the-book-describing-it.html The more specific answer is that all of the midtext examples in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Asssociation are in a sans serif font (even reference examples!). In section 8.03, pp. 228-229, the preferred typeface for APA Style manuscripts is noted to be 12-point Times New Roman, and the only exception to that font recommendation is for figures. For an example of how a manuscript table is actually expected to look, see the sample manuscript in Chapter 2. On page 52, the table in the sample manuscript is clearly in Times New Roman font. So do change your tables back to 12-point Times New Roman and you'll be on the right track!
Toggle Commented Mar 31, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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by Stefanie I am as guilty of hedging as anyone here, if not more so. I am not, by nature, a decisive person. Couple that with work for almost two decades in scientific (Strike 1) writing (Strike 2), and I... Continue reading
Posted Mar 27, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Thank you for your question! The answer lies with whomever you are writing this essay for. Tables usually add to the understanding of articles and essays, so unless your professor or publication says that you can't have one, a table sounds like a good idea to me. Your professor or publication may also have an opinion on where the table should appear (within or at the end of the essay). I lean toward the traditional order of putting the table at the end of the manuscript, especially given that meta-analysis tables often end up being long and thus can be a long text interruption. I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Mar 21, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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by Stefanie Let’s say you are writing a paper, and you have a great point to make that stems from a number of sources, all needing in-text citation. Let’s say one of those sources is head and shoulders above the... Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Thank you for your question! Given that variables can mean different things when not italicized, leave them in italics in table titles. Other things that are usually italicized, such as book titles, can be reversed out. In the following example, the title Moby-Dick should be reversed out (in my preview, it is reversed out, although from my computer, it is not in the actual post--if it does not appear in roman type in your view, please picture it as unitalicized type!): Table 1 Statistics (M, SD, and SE) Regarding the Depression Scores of Every Character in Moby-Dick, Including the Whale I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Mar 13, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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by Stefanie APA Style—is there anything it can’t do? Let’s get back to that. First, let’s talk about what it is. The first version of the publication manual, titled “Instructions in Regard to Preparation of Manuscript,”* was seven pages long... Continue reading
Posted Feb 27, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Thank you for your question! Table 5.15 on pages 147–148 of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition, provides an example of a table that extends over two pages. Do carry over the column headers to the second page; do not carry over the table number and title (the "Table 5.15. Sample Multilevel Model Table" that you also see at the top of the second page of the table is a label for the purposes of the Publication Manual, not the sample table's number or title). At the bottom of the first page, include the word (continued) at the bottom right corner; at the top left corner of the next page, include the word(continued). I hope this helps!
Toggle Commented Feb 27, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Thank you for your question! Think of the copyright date and the copyright owner as two separate things. The article was copyrighted in 1969. If anyone needs to get permission to use something from that copyrighted article, they need to talk to Informa UK. The date the copyright transferred from the original copyright holder to the current copyright holder does not matter. The "by" is a bit confusing there, but maybe think of the wording as Copyright 1969 [now held] by Informa UK. I hope this helps!
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Thanks, Marcus! You're right; the key word in that phrase is citations. Ampersands do not replace every and in a reference. If, in the unlikely case a citation does not have an author, an "and" appears in the shortened version of the title used in the citation, spell out "and." That is, let's say you have an article without a credited author from a newsletter. The title of that article is "Ewoks and Sarloccs and Stormtroopers, Oh My!" and it was published in the 2000 volume of Star Wars Monthly. The in-text citation would be ("Ewoks and Sarloccs," 2000), not "Ewoks & Sarloccs," 2000). I hope that helps!
Toggle Commented Feb 4, 2014 on Changes Parentheses Bring at APA Style Blog
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