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Yellow Trout Lily (Erythronium) Like lots of old-fashioned spring ephemerals this one comes with a slew of funny folk names like dogtooth violet, adder's tongue and fawn lily to mention a few. But what's an ephemeral you say? Just like the label implies these flowers are fleeting. Born atop broad foliage spotted like a trout, the nodding blooms of trout lily appear in early spring and then vanish, going dormant for the rest of the year. The one pictured is the cultivar 'Pagoda'. During the time it blooms this adorable native plant is a source of food for early emerging... Continue reading
Posted Mar 8, 2015 at The Garden Buzz
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Siberian Squill (Scilla) People have mixed feeling about this little blue flower. Lots of people love to see its cheerful blooms rise above the snow this time of year, especially those who share the same weather with its Siberian origins. Popping up in lawns where they readily naturalize; they're a sure sign of spring. Other folks fear its invasive quality after seeing it form thick colonies in local woodlands. In town it serves as an early source of much needed nectar for early emerging native bees. Type: Bulb Habitat Function: Nectar plant for native bees Attracts: Bees Landscape Use: Mass... Continue reading
Posted Feb 28, 2015 at The Garden Buzz
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Witch Hazel (Hamamelis) For many gardeners not much goes on in February. That's where this botanical outlier comes in. Blooming way before other plants in mid-late winter (or for some areas the last thing to bloom in fall) the curious yellow (copper or red) flowers are a welcome sight. Looking like twisty yellow ribbons or shoestring fries depending upon your perspective, the fragrant flowers will brighten your day when it's needed most. Better yet it's perused by bees seeking food in the earliest (or latest) days of the season. Among the first (or last) flowers to bloom Type: Deciduous shrub... Continue reading
Posted Feb 21, 2015 at The Garden Buzz
Hi Becky: You're in for a treat with these. If you are shopping local, you may have to take what you find. If you're ordering online I'd try for the Rubens. You could order from Logees or Raintree. Don't order from those companies that send the larger newsprint catalogs. They sell a variety that has a rounded berry with little to no flavor, plus they send out runners. Good luck! ---Rhonda
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I can't believe your snowdrops are about to flower already, I thought Norway would be at least as snowy as Minnesota. Thanks for stopping by Anne-Kristin.
Toggle Commented Jan 23, 2015 on Winter Interest While It Lasts at The Garden Buzz
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Mike, I'd send you some if I could. Snow at Christmas is magical but once January comes, I done with it. In Minnesota it sometimes stays on the ground until May!
Toggle Commented Jan 23, 2015 on Winter Interest While It Lasts at The Garden Buzz
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In 115 years Minneapolis has had a white Christmas 72% of the time. I guess we had to hit one brown Christmas after living here for seven years. With green lawns and nasty sleet pelting down it was a strange looking holiday. Never fear, two days later just in time for travel, a fluffy snow fell silently in the night. Winter interest in the northern garden is an elusive animal, there for a moment and then covered in white. Snow can define, outline and decorate, bringing out the best of the "bones" in your garden. Or it hides a multitude... Continue reading
Posted Dec 27, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
I'm not connected with production of the show. I have been featured in a few short spots. I didn't see the one about the turkey and Christmas Carol, although I bet you are right. Thanks for keeping everyone on their toes!
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Glad you found the info useful!
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Hi Jen: That was one of my favorites! You are so lucky to live in beautiful Charleston. I make it a point to visit whenever I spend time in Savannah. Glad you enjoyed seeing your box in the blog.
Toggle Commented Nov 15, 2014 on Join Me on an Early Morning Walk? at The Garden Buzz
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Fixed it, thanks for the heads up!
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My husband and I have a deal. When it comes to commerce in our household, he buys, I sell. This means he does all the Christmas shopping! I know, what kind of woman makes her husband do all the Christmas shopping? It's more like I let him. He's just better at it and loves getting out in the hustle bustle of the season. He's first out of the gate on Black Friday while I sit back and wait to see what he brings back in his sack of goodies. I may not be a big shopper but I know what... Continue reading
Posted Nov 11, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
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As the snowy weather hinted at its arrival, the wind had roared all night pushing and shoving the big trees outside my window. The next day as I walked back from the coffee shop (where I drink tea) I noticed this lovely nest on the sidewalk where it had been shook loose from the limbs above. Bird Nest with Zip Ties and Hydrangea Each nest is unique but this one even more so. The bird who made this nest recycled! Well, all of nesting material is recycled if you look at it from a bird's point of view. But this... Continue reading
Posted Nov 10, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
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You've probably seen a similar family; three kids with dirty dishwater blond hair and one suspiciously fiery redhead. Ha, that's the story of my sumac shrubs. I've got lots of Fragrant Sumac, 'Gro-Low', a great native plant cultivar. It's a low maintenance, adaptable plant, a spreading tall groundcover in masses or a striking stand alone specimen. The majority of mine is planted as a long hedge along the driveway. Others are here and there spotted among rocks and grasses above my rain swale. Three different locations and three different shades of fall color. The brightest red is behind the house... Continue reading
Posted Oct 29, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
I've never, ever even entertained the idea of a guest blog post before. But I decided to make an exception. You see this is no ordinary guest post. I know Jenny and Jenny knows her stuff. And I'm a big believer in raised beds. I've been growing edibles for over twenty years and my new raised beds are a joy to use, plus my veggies are happier than ever. As a professional landscaper, Jenny knows the nuts and bolts of building raised beds, as a gardener she knows how they work from seed to harvest. Enjoy! Better Soil, Better Drainage,... Continue reading
Posted Oct 21, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
Mike its possible hes just sleeping. Check on him later. Rhonda Sent from my iPhone
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I plant pineapple sage but only for the wonderful scented foliage, it never blooms before frost! Lots of Monarchs thru here, but hope for more next year.
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Fall asters are a magnet for bees. What's still blooming and buzzing in your garden? Continue reading
Posted Oct 15, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
Thanks for stopping by the blog Jeanne. Good to hear of your healthy frog population.
Toggle Commented Sep 29, 2014 on Frog Wrangling in the Garden at The Garden Buzz
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It is good to see them, especially after the extreme winter.
Toggle Commented Sep 29, 2014 on Frog Wrangling in the Garden at The Garden Buzz
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It's said that frogs are a sign of a healthy garden. The season started here with a few frogs hopping among my plants this spring. Then I noted a few more of the spotted green amphibians known as Northern Leopard Frogs in my water feature and a smaller fountain. I was so glad to see them already established and thriving in my new landscape. Then I happened to look down into the window well located alongside the raised beds of my kitchen garden. Eight feet down I counted eight frogs sitting on the pebbles at the bottom of the well... Continue reading
Posted Sep 16, 2014 at The Garden Buzz
Donna: I'm not sure where you live so it's hard to say what to do. If you can wait until a frost and then trim back branches that would be less harmful. If you prune a lot now, it will try to put on new growth, which will not be hardy for winter. I would worry more about the root system and make sure to allow for a large root ball. It may take several people with it being an awkward size. Water it well in its new home. Best of luck. ---Rhonda
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Kristin, so it leans toward more of a tapenade? What a great idea. Thanks for that tip.
Toggle Commented Aug 25, 2014 on Basil Bonanza? Easy Pesto Recipe at The Garden Buzz
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Patti: I'll have to try that! Sounds like a great time saver. Thanks for stopping by.
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Mike, they are not going to be crisp when thawed. I would add them to a recipe and since you would be using these in a cooked recipe I imagine once they are sautéed, baked, roasted whatever, they would be a little limp anyway. I'd rather have my own a bit soggy rather than store bought in the winter!
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