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Cynthia Scott
Cynthia Scott is a creative thinker with a talent for maximizing organizations.
Interests: Strategic planning, visioning, systems thinking, higher education, fine art, creating curriculum, research, learning and applying knowledge, creative communication, writing, speaking, developing community
Recent Activity
One of the tenets in The 80/20 Principle, is to “impose an impossible time scale” for project management. With an impossible time scale, author Richard Koch writes, people will identify the 20 percent solutions that will bring 80 percent benefit. Last night (10/21/09), on the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, I heard a real-life example of this. Judy Woodruff interviewed Steven Rattner, described as the man behind the overhaul and rescue of Detroit’s auto companies. He has an article out in Fortune magazine outlining his role. What I found most intriguing was how he described the impossibility of the project. He... Continue reading
Posted Oct 22, 2009 at groupcreate
The first set of books on the Personal MBA ™ reading list is all about self-knowledge, productivity and effectiveness, http://personalmba.com/best-business-books/. On the groupCreate project, we’re now reading the fourth book in this section of seven. At just about half-way through the list, I can say that this section alone has already transformed my future. I can only imagine the goodness to come! Thank you, Josh Kaufman, for putting this list together. The current book is The 80/20 Principle, by Richard Koch. Even though I already had a grasp of the basic 80/20 concept, this book startled me awake in how... Continue reading
Posted Oct 22, 2009 at groupcreate
I found the ideas in Getting Things Done to be exhilarating. The focus on personal productivity by corralling and shaping the flow of information has really helped me see my work in a new way. David Allen's concepts embrace the transition from "work" being a place to a process. My goal, as I implemented the ideas in the book, was to create for myself the best possible environment for effective and efficient living. Clearing mental space for new growth in all my projects felt right. I appreciated the author's practical information (the actual how-to steps and checklists) as well as... Continue reading
Posted Oct 22, 2009 at groupcreate
I found the ideas in this book to be exhilarating. The focus on personal productivity by corralling and shaping the flow of information has really helped me see my work in a new way. His concepts embrace the transition from "work" being a place to a process. My goal, as I implemented, was to create for myself the best possible environment for effective and efficient living. Clearing mental space for new growth in all my projects felt right. I appreciated the author's practical information (the actual how-to steps and checklists) as well as the philosophical underpinnings. His illustration about how, and why, bright people procrastinate made me smile. He asks the reader to imagine slicing and tasting a lemon--which should, if you are reading right now, cause your mouth to salivate. Then he explains how the same principle of creative thought applies to piles of unprocessed work. He describes a smart, sensitive, creative person thinking about needing to do his taxes. That thought leads to wild, what-if scenarios (WHICH forms do I use?! DO we have receipts?! What if we get audited?! We're getting AUDITED?! Oh no!) that lead to thoughts of going to jail. "And so," he writes, "a lot of people put themselves in jail, just thinking about their 1040 tax forms." (p. 241 paperback copy). What appeals to me is taking that same, creative, what-if energy and applying it towards imagining, as he puts it, "wild success." The whole principle of imagining wild success at the beginning of ANY project suits me. For me, the word "excellence" is easier to see than "success." So I started looking at each project and asking myself, "what would excellence look like?" That was a good way of generating what success would be for that particular project.
Toggle Commented Oct 15, 2009 on Getting Things Done at groupcreate
1 reply
My strengths are: Maximizer Strategic Ideation Intellection Input
Toggle Commented Sep 29, 2009 on What are your strengths? at groupcreate
1 reply
Here's how I'm applying lessons learned from "The Power of Less:" First, I wrote out a post-it note with my One Goal, and another with my Three Projects, and put them on my refrigerator. Each morning I review those, then decide on my three Most Important Things (MITs) to do for the day. I write those on a third post-it note, date it, and stick it on the fridge. The next morning, I check off what I did, write a new daily MIT list, and put yesterday's MIT list in a folder for the month. The result for me is... Continue reading
Posted Sep 21, 2009 at groupcreate
Hi Jeff--My Strengths are: Maximizer, Strategic, Ideation, Intellection, and Input. Here are the summaries: Maximizer—People strong in the Maximizer theme focus on strengths as a way to stimulate personal and group excellence. They seek to transform something strong into something superb. Strategic—People strong in the Strategic theme create alternative ways to proceed. Faced with any given scenario, they can quickly spot the relevant patterns and issues. Ideation—People strong in the Ideation theme are fascinated by ideas. They are able to find connections between seemingly disparate phenomena. Intellection—People strong in the Intellection theme are characterized by their intellectual activity. They are introspective and appreciate intellectual discussions. Input—People strong in the Input theme have a craving to know more. Often they like to collect and archive all kinds of information.
Toggle Commented Sep 10, 2009 on Play the Strengthsfinder 2.0 game at groupcreate
1 reply
Based on the read-then-do pattern of this group, I read Strengthsfinder 2.0, took the online test, and spent some time verifying the results. I talked it over with friends, and used the action suggestions to get a feel for what was right for me. I also took some guesses about what my 2nd and 3rd tier strengths might be, and developed a few strategies to deal with my weaknesses. Then I used the results to: reorganize my working style, rewrite my resume, and rewrite my bio on LinkedIn. Continue reading
Posted Sep 10, 2009 at groupcreate