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Jeff Hume-Pratuch
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: style, syntax, onomastic diversity
Recent Activity
Hi DWalker, If you have used only one source for your paper, your reference list should have only one entry. As I noted in my post, "These [Kindle] page numbers meet the requirements for citations in APA Style." Use them just as you would the page numbers of a print book. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Susie, There are many different roles in publishing that carry some variation of the title editor. The type of editor who appears in the author position is usually credited on the cover or title page of the book. The executive publisher, editorial director, clinical director, art director, editorial project manager, etc., are not part of the reference. If you'd like to send the details of the book to styleexpert@apa.org, we can give you a more definite answer. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Natacha, That manual is neither published nor authorized by APA, which may explain why some information is missing from it. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Jana, That is definitely a punctuation issue, not a participant issue, but we take all comers on this blog. ;-) The punctuation depends on whether the string "gay Arab Muslim men" is composed of coordinate adjectives or cumulative adjectives. Coordinate adjectives all modify the noun; cumulative adjectives build on each other to form a phrase. In your example, Arab modifies its fellow adjective Muslim rather than the noun men (i.e., there are Muslims who are not Arab, and Arabs who are not Muslim). That makes this a string of cumulative adjectives. Ergo, no comma should be used. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Santosh, APA Style requires each paper to have a running head that appears "flush left in all uppercase letters at the top of the title page and all subsequent pages" (APA Publication Manual, 6th ed., p. 229). If your students are required to use APA Style, this is the format they are required to use. I'm not sure what you mean by "the regular Page Header"; the running head is the only page header that should appear in an APA Style paper. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Mar 19, 2014 on A Marginal Note at APA Style Blog
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Hi Renata, In the U.S. and other countries who are signatories to the Berne Convention, copyright exists from the moment a work is created (i.e., put into tangible form). A published work can be presumed to be copyrighted. Whether permission is needed for an adapted work depends on the extent of the adaptation. Hope this helps, Jeff
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by Jeff Hume-Pratuch Did you know that there’s no such thing as a bibliography in APA Style? It’s a fact! APA Style uses text citations and a reference list, rather than footnotes and a bibliography, to document sources. A reference... Continue reading
Posted Mar 13, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi Lawrence, Use the publisher location as it appears on the title or copyright page of the book in question. Don't attempt to update it. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Mar 4, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Where at APA Style Blog
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Hi Bono, Thanks for posting your very thoughtful questions, some of which are addressed in another post (http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/08/apples-to-%D7%AA%D7%A4%D7%97%D7%99%D7%9D.html). Briefly, APA publishes in English, which is the lingua franca of research in psychology and the social sciences. The translation (and transliteration, where needed) of foreign sources allows readers who are not conversant with those languages to evaluate the source in question and pursue a translation if desired. Although this may not be an ideal solution for those who are fluent in languages using non-Latin alphabets, it does seem to serve the majority of readers. Hope this helps, Jeff
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by Jeff Hume-Pratuch Dear Style Experts, I am writing a paper in APA Style. I have the sixth edition of the Publication Manual, but I’ve been unable to find instructions for how to format my citations in footnote form. All... Continue reading
Posted Feb 13, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi ladychimene, Terms in a foreign language should be italicized throughout. However, if a quoted passage is long enough to be presented as an extract (block quote), italics are not necessary; the indentation sets it off sufficiently from the surrounding text. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Kristina, In APA Style, references are to specific information from the work cited. If you are merely making a passing reference to a series or making a general point (e.g., "The hit TV show Big Bang Theory is about a group of scientists"), no reference is needed. If you are using specific information, that would come from an individual episode (or episodes), not the entire series. Any point that would be general enough to be illustrated by the entire series is probably general enough to need no citation. But if you do need a reference, here's how it would look: Producer, A. A. (Producer), & Creator, B. B. (Creator). (years aired). Title of television series [Television series]. Retrieved from http://xxxxx For a TV show, use the writer and director of the episode and the executive producer(s) of the show (APA Publication Manual, 6th ed., p. 210). http://IMDB.com is the easiest way to find this information. For more about citing audiovisual material, see the APA Style Guide to Electronic References (2012). Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Feb 10, 2014 on A Stylish Guide to Holiday Viewing at APA Style Blog
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Hi Nicole, The article that you read was published in French. You may have been assisted in your reading by some software, but this is no different (citation-wise) than getting help from Le Petit Larousse, or that friend who spent a year in Paris. None of you receives translation credit in the reference. You do, however, need to supply an English translation of the article's title in square brackets: Nicolas, Y. (2004). Le partenariat entre la Bibliothèque Nationale de Nouvelle-Zélande et les Maoris [The partnership between the National Library of New Zealand and the Maoris]. Bulletin Des Bibliotheques de France, 43(3), 79–87. Retrieved from http://bbf.enssib.fr/consulter/bbf-2004-03-0079-003 Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Gillian, Use whatever information you have and put it into the basic author/date/title/retrieval format. This post may help: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/05/missing-pieces.html --Jeff
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Dear HariyantoP, Yes, you must credit any information that you got from a blog. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Yes, that seems reasonable. The main goal is to get your readers to the source. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi raeae23, If the quote forms a complete thought, there should be ending punctuation. Otherwise, that looks fine. --Jeff
Toggle Commented Jan 14, 2014 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Hi raeae23, As noted above, epigrams are indented like block quotations, and block quotations are indented in the same position as a new paragraph. All the text lines of a paper are double-spaced. The author and name of the work quoted are always necessary: In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. -- Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "Kubla Khan" The year is not used unless you are quoting a scholarly work (see above) or a long quotation that requires permission (see APA Publication Manual, 6th ed., 8.04). The title of a poem is enclosed in quotation marks and not italicized; the exception would be a poem that is book length (e.g., Paradise Lost, Mahābhārata, Beowulf, or the Iliad). --Jeff
Toggle Commented Jan 13, 2014 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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The epigraph should be placed at the beginning of the text of the paper. --Jeff
Toggle Commented Jan 13, 2014 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Hi Charles, Here's how your references would look in APA Style. A couple of points to note: (a) If an author has two initials, use them both; (b) these are papers published in formal proceedings, so the title is italicized; (c) the place of publication includes the city and country outside the U.S., but not the state/province; (d) use either a URL/DOI or the place of publication, but not both; (e) "Retrieved from" is not used with the DOI; (f) use a comma after the editors' names, not a period. Felt, A. P., Finifter, M., Chin, E., Hanna, S., & Wagner, D. (2011). A survey of mobile malware in the wild. In Proceedings of the 1st ACM Workshop on Security and Privacy in Smartphones and Mobile Devices (pp. 3-14). http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2046614.2046618 James, P., & Griffiths, D. (2012). The mobile execution environment: A secure and non-intrusive approach to implement a bring your own device policy for laptops. In T. Williams, M. Johnstone, & C. Valli (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th Information Security Management Conference (pp. 100–109). Perth, Australia: Edith Cowan University. Lane, M. (2012). Does the Android permission system provide adequate information privacy protection for end-users of mobile apps? In T. Williams, M. Johnstone, & C. Valli (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th Information Security Management Conference (pp. 66–73). Perth, Australia: Edith Cowan University. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Jamie, Use the year only, --Jeff
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Hi Paul, I don't think I've ever seen an article or dissertation in which confidential information in the text was redacted by blacking it out. The standard method of eliminating material from quoted text is to use ellipses. Perhaps you're thinking of reproducing original documents (as a figure or appendix) with sensitive data blacked out. That would need to be done with great care to insure that redacted information cannot be retrieved from the final document. It's not enough to merely use a permanent marker or draw a black box over the text in Word/Acrobat (as a number of government agencies have found to their dismay). Study sites, like persons, can be described ("a small Midwestern university") or pseudonymized ("Midwest State Teachers College"). The key is to give those attributes that are significant in terms of the research without identifying the place completely. Finally, our apologies for the delay in responding. Your post slipped though our notification system, but we hope this answer is better late than never. Thanks, Jeff
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by The APA Style Radio Theatre (Crowd noises, conversation, chairs squeaking, gradually give way to the sound of a gavel) CHAIR: Ladies and gentlemen. . . . Settle down, if you please. Thank you. I hereby call to order the... Continue reading
Posted Nov 27, 2013 at APA Style Blog
Hi chipit24, Actually, no. Acronyms are not, by definition, always pronounced as words -- at least according to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, which is APA's authority on spelling and definition of terms: ac•ro•nym: a word (as NATO, radar, or laser) formed from the initial letter or letters of each of the successive parts or major parts of a compound term; also: an abbreviation (as FBI) formed from initial letters: initialism. Although acronym and abbreviation initially had distinct meanings, they are now effectively synonyms. So, as I said, a distinction without a difference. --Jeff
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Hi chipit24, In this case it's a distinction without a difference, since the rule is the same for both. --Jeff
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