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Jeff Hume-Pratuch
Washington, DC
I'm a manuscript editor at the American Psychological Association.
Interests: style, syntax, onomastic diversity
Recent Activity
Hi Jacob, Any position that puts the header less than 1 in. from the top of the paper is in conformity with APA Style. --Jeff
Toggle Commented Sep 15, 2014 on A Marginal Note at APA Style Blog
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Hi Jule, There are many reasons to use italics in APA Style (see pp. 104-106 in the Publication Manual), but being a proper noun is not one of them. --Jeff
Toggle Commented Sep 9, 2014 on Do I Capitalize This Word? at APA Style Blog
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Hi Matthew, APA Style has only five levels of headings. However, your university may have additional guidelines specific to dissertations. Your dissertation advisor is probably the best person to ask about this. --Jeff
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Hi Jule, It's fine to combine the two statements into a single quote, with the ellipsis representing the missing words. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 26, 2014 on Ellipses—When and How? at APA Style Blog
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Hi Paul, Thanks for bringing up this question, as I'm sure it affects many people. The DOI must use the domain name dx.doi.org/ and nothing else. The proxy code will divert the reader to the log-in page of your proxy server, which defeats the whole point of the DOI. Hope this helps, Jeff
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About all I can say is that I've never heard of any style guide that forbids the use of an epigraph in an Introduction. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Hi Ilaria, That would be a good question for your dissertation advisor. APA Style does not have any rules specific to dissertations. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2014 on How to Format an Epigraph at APA Style Blog
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Hi Barney, Since you have a choice, use the version archived at ERIC, which was deposited by the copyright owners. The date of publication would be 1996. Chickering, A. W., & Ehrmann, S. C. (1996, October). Implementing the seven principles: Technology as lever. AAHE Bulletin, 49(2). Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED417684.pdf Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 18, 2014 on The Generic Reference: When? at APA Style Blog
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Dear Kevin, The making of many books hath no end, and much study is a weariness of the flesh. (Eccles. 12:12) --Jeff
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Treat it like a magazine article. The author is the pharmaceutical company. The title is the first or biggest line of the ad (whatever makes sense for helping your readers find the particular ad on the page). Follow the title with [Advertisement], and of course, use the magazine title and page number. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Gideon, For online works, the URL replaces the publisher name and location. Your reference should be as follows: Cleveland, H. (2006, October 21). The Cold War: An eyewitness perspective. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/research/foreign-policy/cold-war/symposium/cleveland.html Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Barney, 1. Use year in which the article was published (i.e., the copyright date), not the year in which it was received by the editorial office. 2. "For magazines, newsletters, and newspapers, give the year and the exact date of publication (month or month and day)" (APA Publication Manual, 6th ed., p. 185). Notice that this list does not include journal articles. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2014 on The Generic Reference: When? at APA Style Blog
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Hi Blanca, You'll find the answer here: http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/06/how-do-you-cite-an-e-book.html Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 7, 2014 on The Generic Reference: Where at APA Style Blog
1 reply
Hi Sharon, The date to use in the reference is the date of publication of the material you're citing. The copyright date for the website has no relationship to the publication date of the webpage you're citing. It's the same for every page, regardless of when it was first published, and it changes from one year to the next. It may seem more helpful to give a precise date of 2014 for your reference, rather than (n.d.). But what if that material has been on the website since 1996? You're giving an inaccurate impression of using up-to-date data, when you actually have no idea how old it is. In this case, it's better to be accurate than precise. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Aug 7, 2014 on The Generic Reference: When? at APA Style Blog
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by Jeff Hume-Pratuch Have you noticed that references in most recently published journal articles end with a string of numbers and letters? That odd-looking item is the article’s digital object identifier (DOI), and it may just be the most important... Continue reading
Posted Jul 25, 2014 at APA Style Blog
Hi Lisa, As long as it can't be confused with another source, Kyoto Protocol seems like a reasonable compromise (in the spirit of section 6.15). --Jeff
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Hi Amanda, Use the page numbers in the book that you read. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Dave, Simply include the application information in the reference: American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.)[Android version]. Retrieved from URL Use the URL from which the Android app is available. I'm not aware of a list of DOIs for parts of DSM-5. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Dear Malena, If the work you used is a straight translation, use the normal format for a translated book: American Psychiatric Association. (2003). Diagnose-und statistische Handbuch der Geistesstörungen (G. Geller, Trans.)(4th ed., text rev.). Gottingen, Germany: Hogrefe. Text citation: (American Psychiatric Association, 2003) Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Jul 7, 2014 on How to Cite the DSM in APA Style at APA Style Blog
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Hi MitchJD, Thanks for giving your viewpoint on this issue. We understand your frustration and will definitely pass it along. --Jeff
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Hi Jorge, That looks good, but the title of the proceedings should be italicized: Sinval, J., Vara, N., Queirós, C., Pasian, S. R., & Marôco, J. (2014). Qualidades psicométricas das UWES em bombeiros portugueses [Psychometric qualities of UWES among Portuguese firefighters]. In 10o Congresso Nacional de Psicologia da Saúde (pp. 288–289). Retrieved from https://sites.google.com/site/psaude10congresso/ Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi Jorge, APA Style has no rules about what you can include in your CV. If you would like to include both the abstract and the poster in your CV, follow the instructions above for proceedings and posters, respectively. Hope this helps, Jeff
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Hi jduong, The Serious Scholar blog is actually addressing a different question: whether the table title should be carried over on the second page of a table with (continued). APA Style does not require the use of (continued) in the bottom right/top left corners, but it is helpful to your readers (which is why Stefanie suggested it). Hope this helps, --Jeff
Toggle Commented Jun 20, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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Hi jduong, The note always goes at the end of the table. Hope this helps, Jeff
Toggle Commented Jun 20, 2014 on Table Tips at APA Style Blog
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If you have enough information to reference the original books, I would recommend that course. --Jeff
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