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I've had some experience here, and I have to admire the determination and guts of somebody who suffers from serious clinical depression and even tries to be an activist. I'm not surprised that a depressive would commit suicide under that amount of pressure, but I am that he held together as far as he did. And, Jeff, if you really feel suicidal, presumably from depression, GET HELP. Not only because I'd rather not see your suicide on the front page of Slashdot, but because your life could be better for you and those close to you. Depression is treatable. The treatments aren't perfect, but they can be effective nonetheless. Hang in there and see what sort of help you need.
Toggle Commented Jan 23, 2013 on The End of Ragequitting at Coding Horror
>Don't consider the cost that will come because if a company wants to carry any data they must carry all data. What cost? All I'm asking is that my phone company gets my data through their system both ways, which is what I'm paying them to do. Why would it cost more if they had to pass through a megabyte of this data versus a megabyte of that data? The alternative to carrying all data is that the phone company examines what I want to use the Internet for and decides to let me do that or not itself. That would cost the phone company extra, and would dramatically reduce the value of the connection for me.
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2011 on The Importance of Net Neutrality at Coding Horror
"Net Neutrality" is bad. As a phrase, it's too easy to distort, confusing the vital issue of equal access for everybody's data. I want my VOIP to be high priority and low latency, but I don't even care that much about bandwidth when torrenting the latest Ubuntu distro, just as long as I get it reasonably fast. "Common Carrier" would be a much better phrase, because people have an idea what it means, and there's real-world examples. A railroad may have different rates and requirements for hauling shoes as opposed to jet engines, but they'll haul anybody's shoes for the standard shoe rates, and anybody's jet engines for the standard jet engine rates. Those people relying on the free market may as well rely on unicorns, at least in the US, since they're about as real. Almost all residential internet access is through lines owned and operated by either the phone company or the cable TV company, creating a duopoly with special interests. The phone company would rather you didn't use VOIP, and the cable company would rather you didn't stream NetFlix. Neither is primarily in the Internet business. Similarly, their aren't all that many long-haul carriers, and they aren't necessarily just in the Internet business. In the absence of a free market, the alternative is government regulation, which works well for utilities. My power hardly ever goes off, and never stays off very long, thanks partly to supervision by the Public Utilities Commission. Internet access could work the same way.
Toggle Commented Feb 15, 2011 on The Importance of Net Neutrality at Coding Horror
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Feb 15, 2011