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Population Change and Lifecourse Strategic Knowledge Cluster
Canada
The PCLC Blog is a place to share your knowledge and opinions on population and people’s lives, and how these are affected by changes in families and the experiences in various life domains such as health, learning, caring, aging, working and migration.
Interests: population change, lifecourse, demography, population studies, immigration, health, caregiving, mortality, longevity, fertility, sociology, aging
Recent Activity
In Canada, trends in earning and caring have moved in the direction of reduced gender inequalities, but differences remain large especially when children are present. See http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/pclc/vol3/iss3/2/ Continue reading
Posted Aug 17, 2015 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Mega-trend: will population aging and lifecourse trends soon destroy the legitimacy of the retirement income system? Author: Peter Hicks The wind-up conference of the PCLC cluster last week in Ottawa (March 19 and 20, 2015) was terrific in looking back at what has been learned and in looking ahead, particularly in needed directions for accessing new data. Congratulations to all involved in putting together such a fine event. There is one mega trend on the... Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2015 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Immigration and Labour Force Growth: Watch out for Misleading Generalizations. Rod Beaujot and Don Kerr, Western University In his introduction to the 2014 annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, the current Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Chris Alexander, emphasized that “immigration is soon to become Canada’s primary source of net labour force growth” (CIC, 2014). Similarly in a 2009 speech, his predecessor Jason Kenney observed that ‘with the demographic changes that will soon start to... Continue reading
Posted Jan 25, 2015 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Immigration and the population of Canada: Levels, diversity and economic integration Roderic Beaujot Professor Emeritus of Sociology University of Western Ontario rbeaujot@uwo.ca 2 December 2013 As a demographer, I look at questions of immigration and associated policy, in part through the numbers of immigrants (see Beaujot and Raza, 2013; Kerr and Beaujot, 2013). While immigration is too important to be left to demographers, I would propose that the number of immigrants is an important consideration.... Continue reading
Posted Dec 2, 2013 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Jacques Henripin (1926-2013), pionnier de la démographie au Québec Réjean LACHAPELLE Ancien directeur de la Division de démographie de Statistique Canada La fécondité fut le sujet de prédilection de Jacques Henripin tout au long de sa carrière. Il s’intéressera non seulement aux causes de ses variations, mais aussi aux conséquences de la faible fécondité, en particulier au vieillissement de la population qui en résulte ainsi qu’à la baisse du poids des francophones qui pourrait l’accompagner.... Continue reading
Posted Sep 29, 2013 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
We would like to thank all the students and trainers for participating in the 4th CPS Graduate Student Development Conference, hosted by the Population Change and the Life Course Strategic Knowledge Cluster. This year, the conference has been led by the new CPS student representative, Md Kamurl Islam and assisted by the former organizers, Georgios Fthenos and Stacey Hallman. This workshop helped facilitate networks between established professionals in the fields of demography and population change... Continue reading
Posted Jun 18, 2013 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Census release on families, households and marital status in Canada, 2011: Diversification continues Dated: September 17, 2012 Roderic Beaujot, Department of Sociology, Western University rbeaujot@uwo.ca 519-661-3689 What is new? In anticipating the Census Release of 19 September 2012, I am borrowing the subtitle, “Diversification continues” from the release on families and households in the 2001 Census (Statistics Canada, 2002, 2007). Besides the decline of “traditional” families, the 2001 Census profile emphasized common-law families and lone-parent... Continue reading
Posted Sep 16, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Why do we still need a census? Roderic Beaujot Western University, Canada rbeaujot@uwo.ca Dated August 27, 2012 Revised version of presentation at Panel on “Why do we still need a census” organized by the International Migration Centre, the Canadian Association of Geographers and the Canadian Population Society, Waterloo, 29 May 2012. At its meetings last year, ACFAS, the Association francophone pour le savoir, had a two-day colloquium on “La fin des recensement?”. In his keynote... Continue reading
Posted Sep 12, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP New Brunswick Institute for Data, Research, and Training, University of New Brunswick Candidates with a strong background in quantitative data analysis are invited to apply for a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the newly created New Brunswick Institute for Data, Research, and Training. The candidate’s previous research experience is open, but could focus on topics such as labour mobility, employment mismatch, household dynamics, and socioeconomic mobility. Familiarity with data stored in the Statistics Canada... Continue reading
Posted Jul 12, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
We would like to thank all the students and trainers for participating in the 2012 CPS Graduate Student Development Conference, hosted by the Population Change and the Life Course Strategic Knowledge Cluster. We were thrilled to have seven student presentations, followed by comments and suggestions from professionals working in the field of demography and population change. At the end of the day, comments from Sarah Fortin from the Canadian Research Data Centre Network gave the... Continue reading
Posted Jun 6, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Dated: May 23, 2012 Roderic Beaujot Emeritus Professor of Sociology Western University, Canada rbeaujot@uwo.ca Age and sex: 2011 as a dividing line We have known for at least 30 years that the period 1981-2011 would be a rather ideal time, as aging was producing an increased proportion of the population at labour force ages. Until about 2011, aging was also paired with an increasing employment rate (employed as proportion of the population aged 15+). The... Continue reading
Posted May 24, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
The Globe and Mail article by Joe Friesen and Josh Wingrove (Feb 8, 2012; A12-A13) 'Counting the country: Ontario cedes centre stage to thriving Western provinces' should be a required reading by all students of Canada. It is methodologically sophisticated, very well presented with graphs and illustrations, with accurate use of the numbers, and particularly interesting discussion of implications for the country. View the web version @ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-cedes-centre-stage-to-a-thriving-west-census-shows/article2331829/ Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
Increase the public pension age from 65 to 70, say economists at McMaster University A pair of economists at McMaster University, are calling for a gradual increase of the country’s public pension age, or future generations will suffer the financial consequences. “The major factor is the aging of the baby boom generation,” says Byron Spencer, whose study involving the Canada Pension Plan was recently published in Canadian Public Policy. For more information, view the associated... Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
The PCLC Blog is a place to share your knowledge and opinions on population and people’s lives, and how these are affected by changes in families and the experiences in various life domains such as health, learning, caring, aging, working and migration. The Population Change and Lifecourse Strategic Knowledge Cluster promotes research that will lead academics and policymakers to a clearer understanding of the relationship between population structure and the lives of individuals. Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2012 at Changes in Patterns and Trends
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Feb 15, 2012