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So in this case China produced stuff is a good thing? And by the way where does the power come from at night. Dual power generation with dual facility costs and probably CO2 producing backup unless the NO NUKES side somehow looses ground. All to solve a problem that 98% of working climatologists agree on. What other subject can you get a 98% agreement on anyway. Seems odd doesn't it?
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Where can I buy some of that stock that earns $2.21 for every dollar? That's better than Madoff did. I do like the "beggar-thy-neighbor" thing. Is that one of those externalities or just a right wing fair and balanced thing? Glad to see someone realizing it in any case. Please pass the Grants, I'm starv'n here.
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Good to see a balanced discussion on this. Truth needs both sides to be aired and sorted out.
Toggle Commented Apr 4, 2014 on Not red yet at Environmental Economics
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I'm afraid Nancy is terribly misguided to say the least. It's plain hogwash to contend that PV is cost competitive but the subject is so muddled up with subsidies, feed-in tariffs, back up system, tax incentives and disincentives, etc.,etc. that hardly anyone can understand real picture.
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Hi John, Thanks for responding. It's hard to find hard data on this. I've seen Wisconsin Public television shows years ago that discussed the rising benefits and where they we're shortly going to exceed salaries. It's made up primarily from health insurance which alone can exceed $25k/year and pension cost. I'm sure their is a lot of variance throughout the country on this. Their are other costs to the districts such as Social security, unemployment insurance, workman's compensation insurance, life insurance, etc. I used to get an annual printout of my total cost to my employer and it's eye opening how much it adds up. Some of these costs all employees incur but not the self employed. Here's something I found. Class Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America's Schools - Page 431 books.google.com/books?isbn=1451611994 Steven Brill - 2011 - ‎Preview - ‎More editions In the midst of the Wisconsin fight that stripped teachers and other public employees of most of their bargaining rights, there were multiple ... However, as in Madison, all of their work rules protections and fringe benefits, such as pensions, remained in place. In Milwaukee, the cost of fringe benefits, especially pensions, is such that the average total annual compensation of a teacher is about $99,000.
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I'm always amazed how bad people become heads of fossil fuel burning power companies and good people become teachers and government environmental regulators. Why is that anyway? At least it's good to see that someone recognizes that their is no free lunch. Raise cost of producing energy.. you raise cost to consumers.
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And don't forget to mention that the typical teacher's benefit package about equals their pay and it's only a part time job i.e. about 70% of a regular worker so lets see $35K x 2 divided by .7 equals about $100k. And while your at it why don't you bring up the average age they retire and the average pay at retirement age and the average pension. Then maybe we can all stop tearing up.
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I rode up the ski lift with couple of retired teachers yesterday. They had both retired at 61, had had continued health issuance(no need to wait to reach 65 for Medicare like most)and now (both over 62)with their Social security and unbelievably high pensions had incomes close to what they earned before retirement. Why is it that starting salaries of teachers is always the focal point of public comment and the fact that most teaching jobs are only part time..about 70% of most salaried jobs, is left out of the discussion.
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I like your thinking on this. I wish not only collages but also most enterprises look at things this way.."why don't we just try to do better the stuff we are currently doing?" instead of the grow or die attitude. I believe their is a need to get to a certain size to achieve maximum efficiency but after that I question the need for growth. Really! why does Wal-Mart need more stores? Here's some food for thought re collage costs. http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303870704579298302637802002 Regards.
Toggle Commented Mar 6, 2014 on Dante's lament at Environmental Economics
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You do know the side of the political spectrum that Mr. Reich is on, I hope, and that their is another side of this story. Just look at Detroit and the two major auto companies where the "workers" had a big voice. Not that I don't think the rich should not pay a higher percent tax but I don't agree that they are the reason for lack of success of others. But good luck and try to keep it balanced.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2014 on What I'm doing tonight at Environmental Economics
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It's nice to see that the author of this, Mr. Grimes, is not only an advocate of nuclear power but also sees the similarity of liberals opinion of it and conservatives of global warming. Maybe if more of the "warmer's" articles were buttressed with a demand for more nuclear power plants they would get more conservatives on board. Me... I've been of the view for most my life that nuclear power is the "final answer" and like Krauthammer put me down as an agnostic on climate change.
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PaulS, Well said my boy. I especially like the "Mr. market" and "certain folk claim privileged knowledge" part. I'd like to see a study on how many people are making their living by studying global warming and what the total cost of that enterprise is.
Toggle Commented Jan 24, 2014 on No pain no gain? at Environmental Economics
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A tax system that's fair, where people pay for what they get and use. "I had a dream" By the way who gets to decide what's fair. Me? You? Democrats? Republicans? Obama? The good king? Where is God when we need him?
Toggle Commented Jan 15, 2014 on The electric car tax at Environmental Economics
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http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303870704579298302637802002 Read this. It's more than a pricing issue.
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Amen! Unfortunately to much of America has become getting something and getting someone else to pay for it.
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Being a Duke fan myself, it's a cross we have to bear. Try to say Krzyzewski fast five times in a row. It isn't easy.
Toggle Commented Dec 21, 2013 on Even in Alaska at Environmental Economics
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As usual Zap you are simply wrong!!
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Zap I think found your way to an alternate universe where you have confused ..because of.. for ..in spite of. Don't feel bad, it's a state many Liberals fall into.
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I wouldn't call the near bankruptcy of GM anecdotal.
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Hi Zappa, Somehow I just knew you would disagree. All I can speak from is a lifetime of experience from aerospace(flight test engineer), machine tool mfgr.(design), construction(HVAC design/service), plastic packaging mfgr(Sr project engr)where I personally saw the affect of inefficient work rules. Albeit construction is pretty good. That and then watching the UAW take down the US auto industry and finally when teachers with their little known Cadillac benefits(no cost health ins, no contribution to their fat pensions, retire at 55)before Walker..,I live in Wi., still complain and shutdown the schools if they don't get what they want. And they are teaching our youngsters with this attitude.
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"(and who can be against efficiency?)" Might I suggest Unions. The fireman on trains has been retired but they will fight for mo money and less work over less workers per unit output every time. It's sad but I believe that's why America has lost so many of it's industries. Please pass the turkey, gravy, and tenure.
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I'm with Tim on this one. Maybe the provost a.k.a. Big Kahuna should seek some independent outside counsel instead of the Deans.
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It's about time. Even here in good old Wisconsin their are front page articles saying it's time to end this program.
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A kind of conundrum within a consensus?.... Attempt at poetry!
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First of all everyone is biased. Secondly don't equate Pythagoras with todays climatologists. Thirdly this issue is far from "settled". Temperatures rising is the soundest, the link to human cause becomes weaker and the modeling to a "social cost of carbon" is really out on a limb. The once "settled" consensus that Nuclear power is a bad idea is now falling apart. If one wants to save the world, time would be better spent advocating the speedy development of Nuclear power plants and population control(it doubles every 40-45years) rather than taxing carbon and subsidizing solar and wind.
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