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Scott Cantin
Bangkok
WSPA's Asia Pacific Disaster Management Communications Manager
Interests: Animal Welfare, Disaster Response, Communications for good.
Recent Activity
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James Sawyer, our Director of Disaster Managment feeds a three-year-old dog named Russe. Cabo Monte, Fogo Island, Cabo Verde December 18, 2014. ©World Animal Protection Evacuated animals in disaster zones are often among the least considered, forgotten victims. Unless owners are prepared and have a plan, fast, unpredictable and terribly destructive disasters often leave them no choice to abandon or release their animals in the final moments of safety. Think for a moment about animals with no one particular owner. The friendly cat that hangs around the neighbourhood; the “community” dogs seen across the developing world. Eking out existence through... Continue reading
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Inside the caldera of Volcan Pico do Fogo. The surrounding landscape was fertile famrland and home to thousands of animals and people. The eruption that began on November third has displaced them and obliterated two villages. ©World Animal Protection 2014 In the early morning hours of Sunday, November 23rd, 2014, Augusto Pires 60 and his son Augustino 30 were asleep. Their home and farm were located in the fertile plains within the caldera of Pico do Fogo, a large volcano in Cabo Verde. Suddenly, near 3 A.M. the volcano burst to life for the first time in nearly twenty years.... Continue reading
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While our Asia-based disaster response team is now on the ground in the Philippines assessing the damage from Typhoon Hagupit, our Americas-based team is gearing up to deploy to Cabo Verde. Fogo Island, or "fire" island in Portuguese, has seen nearly constant volcanic eruptions from Pico do Fogo since November 23. This week, news reports describe "catastrophic" destruction. Fogo's eruption seen from space. image credit: NASA / public domain With an economy largely based on agriculture, this eruption - the first in nearly twenty years - has been particularly devastating as the lava flows have destroyed vast areas that include... Continue reading
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A lucky survivor amidst a typhoon ravaged landscape. Animals are often forgotten victims of disasters. Where the need is greatest, we will be there. ©World Animal Protection/Ezra Acayan 2014 Our Bangkok-based disaster response team is headed to the Philippines to assess the impact and animal needs following Typhoon Hagupit lashing the Philippines over the weekend. We'll be working with local governments and veterinary associations to determine what the needs are and how best we can help. Our initial efforts will be centred in Albay, Legazspi and Masbate. I'll keep you updated as we learn more. I just wanted to let... Continue reading
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While preliminary news reports suggest that human fatalities were low, Typhoon Hagupit is slowly making its way across The Philippines now. The Philippines regularly experiences floods and storm surges brought by typhoons. Filipinos go to great lengths to save their animals, sometimes putting themselves at risk to do so. © Ezra Acayan/World Animal Protection 2014 We're cautiously optimistic that the mass evacuations - among the largest ever in peacetime - have kept people safe. What we now want to determine is the impact the storm has had on the animals. While our Mayon response is focused chiefly on evacuating and... Continue reading
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Another major typhoon is due to make landfall in the Philippines over the weekend. Typhoon Hagupit, known locally as Ruby, is set to cross a similar path to the devastating Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) which leveled many communities in the Visayas Region last year, killing over 6,300 people and millions of animals. Hagupit's projected path. Graphic courtesy Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) A cat that survived Haiyan, Central Visayas, Philippines. November 2013. During and following disasters animals need the same things as people: shelter, clean water and food. ©World Animal Protection/Chester Baldicantos 2013 Today we have been sharing disaster preparedness advice... Continue reading
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Cyclone Hudhud over India. October 12, 2014 credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration World Animal Protection was in Andhra Pradesh just a few weeks before Cyclone Hudhud wreaked havoc across the Indian state. We were working with villagers and government authorities conducting disaster response exercises and evacuation drills, helping them prepare their animals and themselves for the deadly impacts of storm surges and flooding. A farmer and his sheep on the way to a World Animal Protection disaster drill. Andra Pradesh. September 25, 2014. ©World Animal Protection 2014/CH Ravi Kumar Hudhud was one of the most destructive cyclones to hit... Continue reading
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A few weeks ago, I posted about Mount Mayon, a volcano in the Philippines that was showing dangerous signs of increased activity. Dr. May Cristine Ablaneda. Vice president of PVMA Bicol region volunteered her time to help World Animal Protection keep the animals around Mount Mayon healthy and safe. October 30, 2014. ©World Animal Protection 2014 People and their animals evacuated to camps, and we were in touch with officials we first worked with around the same volcano in 2001 to check on the animal needs right away. Dr Naritsorn Pholperm inspects makeshift shelters in evacaution camps earlier this month.... Continue reading
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We’re just back from Panay island in Central Visayas, Philippines where we completed the last phase of our nearly year long work following Typhoon Haiyan last November. North Cebu, November 2014. ©World Animal Protection 2013 You’ll remember the devastating stories from that time and thanks to you, we were able to help over 17,000 animals in the immediate aftermath. Disaster veterinarian Naritsorn Pholperm administers vaccinations to a cow. North Cebu, November 2013. ©World Animal Protection 2014 But the work did not stop there. Since then, we’ve equipped a mobile veterinary unit with bikes and motorcycles along with veterinary kits so... Continue reading
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Last November, one of the saddest stories we encountered was the Inamarga farm. They’d lost all of their animals and had little hope for the future. We knew we had to help and looking at the damage that was everywhere, it meant starting over from scratch. Buildings were torn apart or blown away, pigs, chickens, cattle and water buffalo drowned or later died from exposure to the harsh sun. The animals had nowhere to go and suffered through the largest recorded typhoon in history. Since then, working with the family, we reconstructed animal shelters using removable roofs made of local... Continue reading
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Most of our global disaster team were in the Philippines last week working on the conclusion of the relief work we began last year following Typhoon Haiyan. Mount Mayon erupting in 1984. Image credit: public domain. While we were there, Alert Level Three was raised for Mount Mayon, a volcano in the Philippines surrounded by many human and animal communities. We knew this volcano from a previous eruption in 2001 where we put into place mass evacuations for animals affected – something that had not happened previously. World Animal Protection was leading a community evacuation drill with people and animals... Continue reading
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We’re back in Northern Sumatra, Indonesia working just outside the 5 kilometre exclusion zone around Mount Sinabung. We're here to monitor and evaluate the work we did in January and February when we came to assist the evacuation and feeding of livestock from villages in the danger zone surrounding the erupting volcano. Our Asia Pacific Disaster Team Leader Steven Clegg checking on a cow with Mount Sinabung erupting in the background. Our first stop was the volcano observatory where we met with volcanologists for an update on the eruptions. With steam, ash and rockfalls visible on the volcano, it came... Continue reading
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The tragic news this week that Mount Sinabung’s ongoing eruptions claimed an additional sixteen human lives is a reminder how deadly and devastating natural disasters can be. Dr. Naritsorn Pholperm approaches a cow in the danger zone around Mt. Sinabung. February 8, 2014 (Gembong Nusantara) We were in Sinabung, Northern Sumatra, Indonesia earlier this month where we helped hundreds of animals living in the ash-covered wasteland surrounding the volcano. Sinabung recently came back to life after 400 years of inactivity and has been erupting nearly constantly (50-100 times a day) for several weeks. When our team arrived, we discovered that... Continue reading
Hi - sorry for the very late reply. We've been incredibly busy responding to multiple disasters in the region. Our CEO, Mike Baker wrote on this very topic today: http://ind.pn/19Y8jyU If you'd like to see a future blog post exploring this concept, please let me know. Cheers, Scott
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It was early morning but the sun’s intensity was enough to wear you out after only a few minutes. We were on our way to Malalison Island – a tiny bump in the ocean about a half hour by motorboat from the west coast of Panay. The World Animal Protection team setting out, with Malalison in the distance We’d heard from our local partners that little was known of the impact of Typhoon Haiyan on Malalison as communications had been severed. We knew they were mostly fisherman and farmers and they were directly in the storm’s path so we expected... Continue reading
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Today I met a family whose story of Typhoon Haiyan broke my heart. Nenita Inamarga 63 and her daughter in law Jeniffer Inamarga 35 described the horror that devastated their farm on the afternoon of November 8 and has left them scared and without hope ever since. “We heard on the radio that the typhoon was coming but they predicted it would be signal one (the lowest on the Philippines ranking category),” Jeniffer said. “But then around midnight on the eighth, it was upgraded to signal 4 (the strongest).” Jeniffer and her daughter Ruth Inamarga in front of their chicken... Continue reading
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It’s day 17 of our relief work in the Visasyas provinces of the Philippines. Every day, I’ve heard inspiring stories of survival and painful stories of loss. It’s difficult to convey the scale of this disaster or how serious a situation the Filipino people and their animals are facing so let me instead, tell you about some of the people and animals we are helping. Rilie Francis is 11 years old. He and his one year old dog Liney came form treatment at our mobile clinic in Mamarang Sapa. He described the terror he felt the night of the typhoon... Continue reading
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Today we stopped in five villages and treated dozens of dogs, cattle water buffalo and pigs. Mamarang Sapa village sits high in the mountains of Aklan Province. The typhoon has made access to these villages extremely difficult, and the rains yesterday nearly prevented us from reaching them at all, with a nearby river threatening to overflow and wash the roads away. Villages like Mamarang Sapa have received next to no attention and very little outside help. The people and animals have been hanging on for weeks now and we were the first INGO on the scene to help. I met... Continue reading
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World Animal Protection's Drs. Naritsorn Pholperm and Daniel Ventura have returned from Northern Cebu and Bantayan Island after helping thousands of animals by administering life-saving veterinary care in some of the areas that were hit hardest by Typhoon Haiyan over two weeks ago. Dr. Nartisorn Pholperm treats a cow in Northern Cebu Island. November 23, 2013 Over four days, the team worked with 23 dedicated local volunteer vets. They assessed over 13,000 animals and treated over 2000! Diarrhoea and tick infestations have been the most common conditions our vets have managed. Both can prove fatal if left untreated – ongoing... Continue reading
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Our three-day rapid assessment of Western Visayas is now complete. We have been helping animals we’ve come across all through Antique, Kalibo and Roxas provinces. We’ve been providing vitamins, mineral supplement solutions to cows, chickens and dogs as well as anti-worm drugs so that these survivors do not now succumb to chronic malnutrition and parasites. Dr. Juan Carlos Murillo treats a three year old pregant cow that exhibit signs of respiratory distress as her owner Olivia steadies her (Troncophotovideo) Conversations are underway with local veterinarian associations and faculties to train, equip and deploy them into the worst stricken areas in... Continue reading
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As one World Animal Protection Response team is out working helping thousands of animals with vaccinations and veterinary care in Northern Cebu and Bantayan Islands,our second response team is just back from our first day of rapid assessment in Antique, Western Visayas. Yesterday, we visited communities and farms all along this province that makes up the western coast of the island of Panay. Dr. Nartisorn Pholperm prepares to treat an a cow on Bantayan Island. November 22, 2013. As in Cebu last week, we saw evidence of the terrible fury of Typhoon Haiyan. Destruction was everywhere and, two weeks out,... Continue reading
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We've all seen the news reports of devastation in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan's (called Yolanda in the Phillipines) arrival in the early morning hours of December 8th. The storm, the largest typhoon on record left thousands dead, tens of thousands displaced and left a trail of misery and suffering behind. Do you remember Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Sandy? How much damage each of these storms did? Haiyan's force was equal to Katrina and Sandy combined. We're working in Cebu Province and a nearby island called Bantayan in the intial emergency response. But, when a disaster this big, this devastating... Continue reading
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We’re working in Cebu, one of the two worst hit provinces of the Philippines and also where some of the poorest areas in the country are located. Cebu is also a province with a high animal population - everyone we meet seems to have a dog or cat, but also livestock and poultry. We’ve seen an urgent need for food for companion animals. As you can imagine, when people themselves cannot find enough to eat, it is equally dire for their pets. While livestock will also need our help, for the moment, they do not face the same risk of... Continue reading
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The farmers had no chance to save their animals. The fury of the storm ripped poultry farms to shreds, scattering birds and levelling their hatches. Poultry farmers have sifted through the debris to find live chickens they can relocate after their cropswere raised to the ground in northern Cebu, Philippines (C. Baldicantos). Cattle, goats and water buffalos wander the roads, their owners have no food to eat themselves so they cannot provide for their animals. They forage among downed trees and debris, getting skinnier each day. A cow forages beside a highway in Cebu Province. November 13, 2013 Pets, separated... Continue reading
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We’ve nearly finished our rapid assessment of Cebu and Bantayan Islands and have linked up with municipal governments and veterinarians at each stop to make sure our work supports the larger humanitarian effort all around us. We’ve been very encouraged by the reception we received from Neil Sanchez, the coordinator of relief efforts for Cebu Province. One mayor, in San Remigio the honourable Mariano Martinez, told us that animals were not part of the needs they’d identified, but after speaking with us, he recognized how the well-being of animals is tied to the wellbeing of the people, both in this... Continue reading