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Brent Yamamoto
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Being - Tactically and Practically - Prepared By Ted Demosthenes, Suarez International Instructor You’ve just finished lunch on Day One of your class with Suarez International. With your busy work-week behind you, the trip down to Phoenix went well, including the airport check-in adventure of dealing with the ticket agent, airline paper-work, other passenger’s raised eyebrows, the TSA’s inconsistent packed-weapon practices, and the ever-enjoyable trip through the “security” check point. The weather’s mild, the range is great, and the class members are friendly and experienced. The morning has been spent doing admin, safety briefings and class conduct, a thorough review... Continue reading
Posted Jun 18, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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By Brent Yamamoto, Suarez International Instructor What will you do in a gunfight? What are your capabilities? How will you fight to your goal, and how can you avoid getting killed? Do you know, or do you just think you know? These questions and many more are answered in Force on Force training. In the martial arts world, the training progression basically goes like this: Solo training: learning, performing, and polishing the fundamental techniques. Punching, blocking, kicking, etc. Building gross and fine motor skills. Impact work: hitting stuff. Focus mitts, kick shields, the heavy bag…things that allow you to feel... Continue reading
Posted Apr 12, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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Part Four I’ve discussed the Beretta CX4 Storm at length here, here and here. I want to finish up this series with a discussion on upgrades and accessories. The Storm is a great performer out of the box but there are few things that will make it even better. Accessories I wouldn't presume to tell anyone how they should set up their gun...but it wouldn't be much of an article if I didn't share my opinion on it. What you do to the gun depends on how you intend to run it. Rails are easily added that let you mount... Continue reading
Posted Jan 31, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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Part Three In Part One, I discussed the rationale for the PCC, and started a conversation on why the Beretta CX4 Storm is an excellent choice. In Part Two, I shared some impressions about the gun, some noteworthy features, and briefly discussed shooting it. Let's turn to what I think is the most interesting aspect of the Storm: how it handles. Lighter and easier to use one handed than the Uzi Lightweight and Well-Balanced - I've already mentioned the weight; lower weight means easier handling in general. The weight and short overall length make this gun very handy in a... Continue reading
Posted Jan 23, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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Part Two In Part One I shared some ideas about the niche and benefits of Pistol Caliber Carbines and began discussing how the Beretta CX4 Storm is a solid choice for that role. Here's Part Two... The Storm has been around since 2003, so I won't go into all the gun details. However, here are a few items I find noteworthy… Caliber and Magazines The 9mm and 40 S&W CX4 models are designed to be compatible with magazines for several Beretta pistol models - the 92/96, the PX4 Storm, and the 8000/8040 Cougar. In other words, a 9mm or 40... Continue reading
Posted Jan 17, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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Part One I had planned on driving, despite the winter road conditions. I like driving through wintry mountain passes, even if it isn't the wisest thing to do...it provides a little bit of adventure, and I enjoy the solitude. Plus, I wanted to do some vehicle training with my FS2000, and this is more easily accomplished where I was headed. As it happened, nature didn't agree to my plan. All the mountain passes were closed, so I bought a last minute ticket from Seattle to Boise and counted myself lucky that I got to see my family for Christmas. Long... Continue reading
Posted Jan 3, 2013 at TAIPAN Magazine
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"Keep your finger off the trigger until you've made a conscious decision to shoot." Most of you know this rule. Simple, right? It's certainly a simple concept, and it's easy to have good trigger finger discipline in an air-conditioned square range. (I should hope so - working the trigger is mostly all you're doing!) But maintaining trigger finger discipline on command…without fail…during stressful situations is harder than most people realize. It doesn't matter how great a shooter you are – there are plenty of excellent marksmen whose trigger discipline goes in the toilet the moment they are exposed to more... Continue reading
Posted Nov 6, 2012 at TAIPAN Magazine
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Nov 5, 2012