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Susanna Kearsley
Writer. Dreamer. Traveller. Mom.
Recent Activity
I'll make a convert of you yet, Anne :-) Tell you what, next novel you work on, perhaps you should have me find a book or two for your heroine's library...?
Toggle Commented May 12, 2018 on A Library Fit For A Hero at Word Wenches
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Glad you enjoyed it, Kareni. I do love old books.
Toggle Commented May 12, 2018 on A Library Fit For A Hero at Word Wenches
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It's one of my most favourite rabbit holes. I can get lost reading those books, and often find passages or phrases that end up triggering bits of a scene or an exchange of dialogue between my own characters. It's really fun!
Toggle Commented May 12, 2018 on A Library Fit For A Hero at Word Wenches
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Every period does have different conventions for naming the author (or not), although there are always exceptions. I'm just very glad "the author of 'Sense and Sensibility'" continues to find new readers in our modern age, because her books are lovely :-)
Toggle Commented May 12, 2018 on A Library Fit For A Hero at Word Wenches
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"Young Man Reading Under A Tree" by Julien Léopold Boilly, 1796-1874 (Morgan Library & Museum) Susanna here. In an earlier post, we talked about the hero in the library. But libraries are nothing without books, and in there are times in a novel when someone has to actually take a book off the shelf and do something with it, so today I thought it might be fun to share how I go about stocking the shelves for my characters. Since most of my books are twin-stranded, I probably ought to point out that I mean the historical characters, since when... Continue reading
Posted May 10, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Hi, Donna, Sorry about the wait, but I'm back from my Canadian book tour now and wanted you to know the random number generator chose your comment as the winner! If you'd like to email me at susanna_kearsley(at)yahoo.ca with your mailing address, and let me know whether you'd like your copy signed to you or someone else, I'll get it in the mail to you! Congratulations. (Note: make sure you email it to yahoo.ca, the Canadian one, and not yahoo.com :-) Thanks!)
Toggle Commented May 6, 2018 on That New Book Feeling at Word Wenches
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The doorbell rang as I was putting my coat on to head out to pick up my youngest from school. I wasn't expecting a package. I didn't have time for distractions. The snow (yes, in April) was still coming down, and I had to get going or give up all hope of a place in the parking lot. But I still answered the doorbell. And there was the courier, holding the box sent by Simon & Schuster of my first Canadian copies of Bellewether. This is my thirteenth book. I have been published for twenty five years. And the feeling... Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Susanna here. Nearly a full decade ago, whilst puddling about on the internet when I should have been writing, I happened upon a lighthearted post by Lynne Connolly at the Historical and Regency Romance UK blog titled: “Create Your Own Regency Romance”, listing various scenarios and options for the would-be writer. While some of the options were more inspired than others, I confess it was the fifth option for where the hero and heroine might first make love that I found most amusing: “In his library where she has gone in the middle of the night, barefoot, in search of... Continue reading
Posted Mar 7, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Anne, I always think it's fun waiting to see what my heroes are going to end up like. Most of the time they're relatively quiet, but every now and then I get a chatty one, like Edmund, and I have to say I find that quite refreshing :-)
Toggle Commented Feb 24, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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Karen, that is adorable. Like you, I'm a very wordy person married to a decidedly un-wordy man, so I completely understand the balance (although I am envious of your elephant :-)
Toggle Commented Feb 24, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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Tempest, some of my all-time favourite scenes in films are "ordinary-task gesture" ones. Harrison Ford packing Melanie Griffith lunch on her first day at work for her new job, in Working Girl. Ben Affleck turning up to wash the dishes and stock the fridge for Jennifer Aniston in He's Just Not That Into You, when she's been running herself ragged taking care of her dad and no one else has been helping her. Ewan McGregor bringing Emily Blunt a sandwich in Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. THOSE are the moments that make my heart melt.
Toggle Commented Feb 24, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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Agreed. And I'm glad that AAR post survived their move. The link I used back in 2010 no longer worked and I had to go hunting a bit, but thankfully the AAR folks archived all their blog posts when they updated their web site :-) It's a good post, and a thoughtful one.
Toggle Commented Feb 24, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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Sue, up-to-date kitchen tools are VERY important (and flowers make me sneeze, so there's also that...)
Toggle Commented Feb 23, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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But I love your articulate men! Do NOT change them!
Toggle Commented Feb 23, 2018 on When They Say Nothing At All at Word Wenches
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Susanna here, still on deadline and dusting off old posts again, but this time on a subject that's been on my mind a lot while I've been working on this new novella. Hugh MacPherson, the historical hero of my book A Desperate Fortune, was probably the most stubborn and difficult man I've ever written, taking "strong and silent" to a new extreme for me, sometimes refusing to speak at all when he was in a scene. And even though I'm writing from Hugh's point of view in this novella, and so at least have a better idea of what's going... Continue reading
Posted Feb 23, 2018 at Word Wenches
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Sandra, I agree with you--beauty is very subjective. And what makes someone attractive isn't necessarily physical.
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And Elizabeth Taylor was DEFINITELY beautiful! :-)
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Thanks, Patricia. And I think you're right, there is a difference when you're writing in third person vs. first person. Third also allows you more freedom to describe, in a way, although I have to confess I still don't often take advantage of it :-)
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Alice, I think that can be an extremely interesting angle to consider, both in stories and real life.
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Margaret, for me it depends on the book. I adore the Lord of the Rings movies, and David Suchet IS Hercule Poirot for me, in the same way that Jeremy Brett IS Sherlock Holmes. As a child, I almost always saw the movie first--usually at the weekly Saturday matinee in our small town movie theatre, where the owner dredged up old films and ran them with old serials and cartoons for 50 cents a show every week (bring your own popcorn if you wanted to). That was where I saw The Railway Children, The Secret Garden, The Time Machine (with Rod Taylor--swoon), The Borrowers, and a score of other movies, and then on my way home from the cinema I'd stop in at the library and get the book to read, so the first image of the characters in my mind was usually that of the film's actors. Backwards from the usual way :-)
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Alison, I think maybe that's why I secretly prefer the Sally Hawkins TV version of Persuasion, because she's pretty but not perfectly pretty, and I can imagine myself being HER Anne Elliot, whereas with a more classically beautiful actress I might not be able to, so I understand your point completely.
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Stephanie, that's a great point. I know in Mariana, I was very careful never to mention Richard's beard after I first described him (at least I don't think I mentioned it again), because I figured most modern readers would "see" him as clean-shaven, and that being reminded of his beard would throw them out of the story. So I'm glad to know I wasn't wrong in that assumption!
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That's interesting, Janice. I tend to notice people in parts and pieces--their general shape, their skin colour, their smiles, their eyes, their hands...that sort of thing. I have a particular "thing" for hands :-)
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Annette, I like to imagine the characters, too, when I'm reading. Maybe that's why I like leaving space for my readers to imagine, too.
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Thanks, Joanna. Glad to have inspired you :-)
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