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Susanna Kearsley
Writer. Dreamer. Traveller. Mom.
Recent Activity
Janga, I haven't read Elswyth Thane yet, though I've meant to for a long time (ever since finding out she was one of the favourite authors of one of MY favourite authors, Jan Cox Speas). I have her Tryst in my TBR pile, and it looks to be right up my alley. I just have to wait till I'm finished this current book...
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Footsteps at Word Wenches
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Mary, that would be a lovely trip to take. I do hope you get a chance to go.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Footsteps at Word Wenches
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Your holiday at Rye Harbour sounds wonderful, for both of you (I'll have to look up that acoustic mirror next time I'm in the vicinity--I'm fascinated by things like that). And Corfu, you might be interested to know, is also on the Mary Stewart-lovers' tour map. Her book This Rough Magic is set there, and the landscape and its legends are woven beautifully into the story. My mother was reading that book while pregnant with me, and it's long been a favourite of mine, so much as I loved My Family and Other Animals, if I went to Corfu I'd be seeing it through Mary Stewart's eyes :-) Thanks for your kind words, too. The Shadowy Horses is set just north of Northumberland, across the border in Eyemouth, Scotland. Beautiful part of the country to visit, with lots of good rambling paths.
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Footsteps at Word Wenches
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Anne, the gods probably took your "cooeee" for a war-cry, and answered in kind :-) Very neat to think you and I were standing on the same spot, though. You know how much I love all these connections. And I'll happily join you on that Madam Will You Talk trip (though I might spend all my time waiting for Richard at the Chateau d'If pier...)
Toggle Commented 6 days ago on Footsteps at Word Wenches
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Every now and then a reader writes to tell me that they’ve gone on vacation to one of the settings I’ve used in my books, and have sat where my characters sat or have walked on the same path, and I’m always amazed and incredibly flattered that someone would go to the trouble of doing that. Not that I don’t understand. In the spring of 2007, I took a research trip to Greece, for the half-finished sequel to Every Secret Thing (which was coming along fine until the idea for The Winter Sea took over, and since then it’s been... Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Word Wenches
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The Blue Castle is my favourite Montgomery book (followed closely by Anne of Green Gables and Rilla of Ingleside). I adore Valancy. And it's set in an area not far from where I live, so I can picture the lake and the cabin just perfectly.
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in August at Word Wenches
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Hope you enjoy Stardust. And yes, I'm very happy to be nearing the end of the current manuscript--it feels like I've been writing it FOREVER :-)
Toggle Commented Sep 1, 2017 on What We're Reading in August at Word Wenches
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“Woman Reading and a Girl Playing” by Francois Guérin, 1748 (public domain image) Susanna here, forced to admit that I haven’t been doing much reading these past few months. My new book is due to my editors in a few weeks so I haven’t had much time for anything else. But I did get to spent a few days with my nephews and brother-in-law at our cottage—an annual family tradition and one of those times I look forward to every year—and when I let the boys pick out a movie to watch, they chose Stardust. I love, love this film... Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Isn't it the truth? Every book is such a different animal. In THAT respect, I think, books are like children--just when you think you've figured out what you're doing, the next one comes along and proves you know nothing at all :-)
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2017 on Ideas at Word Wenches
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I know a lot of writers give one-liner answers to the question because it IS a tricky question to answer, but I also know readers wouldn't ask it unless they genuinely wanted to know, so I've tried to give a more in-depth answer. Thanks for your kind words about the books. Glad you enjoy them.
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2017 on Ideas at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Stephanie. The people in the footnotes of the history books have always been my favourites :-)
Toggle Commented Aug 9, 2017 on Ideas at Word Wenches
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It's a truth, not unrelated to this topic, that a post here often grows out of a prior post and the ensuing comment thread. A case in point: Last time, I talked about Craftsmanship, and in the comments Quantum said, "It seems to me that generating ideas for new plots is even more important…Can you comment on how ideas for new novels are generated. Do you have to work at it or do the ideas just float into your mind from the aether?" And since that seemed to be a topic too involved for me to give a good reply... Continue reading
Posted Aug 9, 2017 at Word Wenches
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Or that they're a time-traveller :-)
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2017 on Craftsmanship and Comfort Zones at Word Wenches
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Quantum, what a marvellous idea for another post! If you can bear with me till my next time up at bat here, I will try to take that one for you, because it's a great question. As for mastery of technique, I have to say I'm always learning something new, no matter how "established" I may have become. Technique is not a cup that can be filled, in my opinion. One of the things that happens when you're a writer is, the longer you're at it, the less you're able to get lost yourself in the books of another, because you become more aware of the craftsmanship. If I find myself jumping at a scary scene, for example, I start flipping pages back, asking myself, "How did they DO that?", and examining the subtle structure of the scene instead of just going along with it :-) And then in my next book, when I want to add more suspense to my own scenes, I try my own twist on that same technique. That's what I mean about craft. You keep learning and trying and finding your own way to use the tools. It never ends (or at least, in my case, it hasn't ended yet). But I do really like your other point, and I will try to answer it in my next post.
Toggle Commented Aug 1, 2017 on Craftsmanship and Comfort Zones at Word Wenches
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Shelagh, I'm SO glad you've found your happy place as a writer :-) It may change a little as you go on, because as you've rightly pointed out, we all grow in our journeys. Age has a lot to do with it, I think, and experience. There are stories and scenes I could never have written as a younger woman (and stories I tackled in my braver youth that I probably wouldn't have the nerve to attempt now--back then I just rushed in headlong and analyzed later :-) Our writing is so much a part of US--who we are, what we are living through, what we are trying to understand--that it's inevitable there will be some change. Writing is how we process life, and life is never motionless. I hope your journey in this craft is every bit as wonderful as mine has been.
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2017 on Craftsmanship and Comfort Zones at Word Wenches
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Thanks, Anne. I think connection with an author is important, though I have to confess it doesn't always work for me, either. For instance, I love Mary Stewart's romantic suspense novels, but have never really connected with her Arthurian books. I don't know why. And yet, I know for some of her readers it's entirely the other way round :-) So there's no right or wrong to it, really. Just personal taste. And I'm sure she enjoyed writing both genres equally.
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2017 on Craftsmanship and Comfort Zones at Word Wenches
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Mary, taking a few steps outside the box is usually an interesting adventure for anyone (real or fictional :-). I'm glad you feel this way.
Toggle Commented Jul 29, 2017 on Craftsmanship and Comfort Zones at Word Wenches
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(This post originally ran on The Heroine Addicts in January, 2013, but I'm re-posting it here because now that I'm nearing the end of one book and the start of another, I'm thinking about this again...) Often when I'm asked by other people to describe a writer's life, I use analogy. I tell them writing is a craft, and that like any craftsperson, a writer starts rock-bottom: as apprentice to the masters. Like a cabinet-maker learning how to craft a chest of drawers, the writer takes the tools in hand, and learns the use of them, the tricks of them—the... Continue reading
Posted Jul 28, 2017 at Word Wenches
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:-) I inherited my asthma from my mother, who also spent a good part of her childhood lying sick in bed, so she knew how to pamper me.
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2017 on The Best Medicine at Word Wenches
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Kareni, I never had the energy for activity books when I was really sick, although I loved them at other times. My favourite "activity" was doing all those little transfer-rubbing pictures that used to come on the back of our cereal boxes, back in the day...
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2017 on The Best Medicine at Word Wenches
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Your father had good recommendations! And I know exactly what you mean about "fond memories". Not that it's ever fun to be sick, but at least no one ever complains that you're lying in bed doing nothing but reading :-)
Toggle Commented Jul 20, 2017 on The Best Medicine at Word Wenches
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Joseph Caraud, "Am Morgen", 1865 (via Wikimedia Commons) As a lifelong asthmatic allergic to just about everything in my environment except for goldfish and rocks, I spent a lot of my childhood days sick and in bed. My family did what they could to make me feel less alone. My sister loaned me toys. My dad carried our one TV (black-and-white, naturally) upstairs to my room so I could watch Sesame Street in the morning. My mother would serve me my meals on a tray, like they did when I went to the hospital. She made the best lunches—soup, Saltine... Continue reading
Posted Jul 18, 2017 at Word Wenches
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:-)
Toggle Commented Jul 7, 2017 on All Dressed Up at Word Wenches
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Oh, you should! It feels like stepping into another time, it's really magical.
Toggle Commented Jul 7, 2017 on All Dressed Up at Word Wenches
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Shelagh, if it makes you feel less jealous I can promise you I'm not wearing the gown to write -- I spend most days in either pajamas or yoga pants and T-shirts :-)
Toggle Commented Jul 7, 2017 on All Dressed Up at Word Wenches
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