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Tory Solicitor
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The question from Kate Hoey wasn't that surprising. after all, minister Tessa Jowell has already publicy opposed the axing of the Maudsley clinic does anyone know if Jowell is standing again? - I like to think we could beat her given the battering her reputation has taken in the last 18 months
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I expect Michael Gove is just stirring things up in a london specific context We should wait until we have an outright majority. Please no suggestions of PR. Haven't we had enough constitutional vandalism in the last 10 years?
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I look forward to Martin Linton's exit. The theme of new labour incompetence is being nicely nurtured
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Justin, do you disagree with the selection process suggested? I struggle to see how anyone could object to it.
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in my view the following need to work the tv studios etc relentlessly: Lansley, Willets, Osborne, Spelman, Villiers, Davis and Hague
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Angelo, I was thinking more of a permanent right to derogate on free movement of workers, each MS effectively deciding their own policy I agree with contributors above that it is easy to exaggerate the impact of immigration on house prices. But immigration does give rise to all sorts of housing peculiarities. I have heard that in Lambeth seasonal Portugese workers push themselves to the top of the social housing queue by pretending to be "homeless". The local authority has the money to check up on claims of homelessness by UK citizens but not on the claims of non-UK EU 'citizens'. Can anyone suggest a solution to that issue which is both legal and not costs prohibitive?
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given the further enlargement of the EU yesterday, it might be time to start arguing for derogation by member states on free movement of workers.
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My 2p 1. I think we need to get away from the idea that anyone has a divine right to own a home. They do not. This is especially the case given that so many more people now live alone for long parts of their lives. 2. A related idea is that of subsidising the property purchases of key workers. I think this is wrong-headed. If you think key workers are paid too little, make the case. If the case is strong, we should advocate increased pay for key workers (whoever they may be)rather than costly and complicated subsidy schemes. 3. Surely the best way to help "strivers" (I think I bracket myself in this category)is to increase the personal allowance (how about no income tax for sums earnt under £8,000?). This could be accounted for with an increase in VAT so as to chime with the 'sound money' theme (at least in the short term)
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Richard, I stand corrected!
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I agree with Paul about Caroline Spellman. It would be good if Spellman and David Davies were "used" in the media a bit more
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you have to give the leadership credit for this - I only follow the polls casually but we seem to have been around the 36-40 mark for some time. now for the forties!
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aunt sally was talking about social authoritarianism in the 1980s
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The Blair governments have introduced a quite enormous amount of criminal justice legislation since 1997. But it isn't working and the burdens it places on our public sector workers, especially the police, probably makes increases in crime more likely. Blair needs to understand that you cannot just legislate crime away. not sure that this electoral message (cameron's one-liner) is likely to be quite as powerful as EdR suggests though. I think polling show that crime is surprisingly far down the list of the electorate's priorities (of course specific seats may be exceptions)
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I don't claim to have any detailed knowledge on peter hitchen's views and am not hugely inclined to find out. But his personal views are not v important. on this subject, what matters in my view is that a. the law should not treat homosexuals in a discriminatory way (I can't think of any ways in whch it does any more. can anyone else?) ; and b. we should provide support for families through the tax system as this will in the long term lead to a reduced welfare burden on the state
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I agree about Michael Gove. The man is outstanding. I doubt that Hitchens means to be rude about homosexuals. When I have seen him on TV or heard him on the radio, it’s clear he is passionate about families and I think this sometimes comes across unintentionally as anti-homosexual I wish that posters wouldn't seek to demonise particular individuals who are conservative with a small c as a way of self-identification (in reality the differences are often more imagined than real). Let's focus on the real enemy: Labour
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what was the turnout last time? I also agree with max By the way it is legitimate to point out that a larger per capita share of public spending goes to scotland but I think that it's important that we don't express this in a tabloidesque manner or the argument swiftly reduces to a debased scots v english slagging match which is very boring. We need to lead the way on resolving the west lothian question and cannot rely on gordon brown. for all we know he believes, like Lord Falconer, that "the best way to answer the west lothian question is not to ask it"
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a transparent attempt by Milliband to ferment division in the Conservative party it won't work
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Is radio 4's 'thought for the day" slot free of political impartiality rules? Yesterday the thought for the day contributor (his name escapes me) made it crystal clear that he thought George Bush's "axis of evil" line had been a mistake. Meanwhile over on radio five live Nicky Campbell was providing a similar anti-Bush narrative, focussing again on the "axis of evil" speech and also repeatedly referring to Bush's actions rather than the actions of the US administration or even the Bush administration. The BBC's centre left demonisation of George Bush continues and the debate is retarded as a result.
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Heffer is very bright but he seems to have taken a bizarre personal dislike to DC. odd
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"betraying the party" Christina? That's a very strong term. The party is a broad church. And ultimately of course, it matters far more what we do in power than what we say in opposition. If Cameron manages an outright majority at the next GE (rather than a hung parliament), I predict that tax as a percentage of GDP - the most sensible measure in my view - will fall over the course of the parliament
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"52% of voters believe that you can have tax cuts and economic stability or simply prefer tax cuts." This is a large percentage. [By the way it was 46% in my copy of the ST] But I would suggest that most of them will vote tory anyway. It's perhaps the 41% who believe stability is more important than tax cuts that we need to focus on. Whatever we say, I can't believe anybody will believe that the tax burden is likely to be higher under the tories. I'm no expert but I think we should persist with the cameron/osborne/hilton tax strategy
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ed, what is a 'reload'?
Toggle Commented Oct 8, 2006 on Sunday 8th October 2006 at ConservativeHome
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editor, do you think they might advertise for the permanent jobs in the IO on conservative home? just an idea
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editor, do you think they might advertise for the permanent jobs in the IO on conservative home? just an idea
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"intellectual skills" is an odd turn of phrase
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