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Adam Ricketson
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"It would be interesting to find out how many districts with a city of more than 250,000 are "red," and, conversely, how many districts without a city of more than 50,000 are "blue." I'll have to ferret out the information." Here's the map of voting patterns that can get you started: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/election/2008/
Hi, I just found this blog via the Front Porch Republic (http://www.frontporchrepublic.com/2010/11/who-would-be-out-of-work/) I enjoyed the reminiscences about the "old cities", but I'm a bit baffled by the description of existing cities. Fist, it seems that the author does not consider suburbs (and "exurbs" to be part of "the city". I don't think that it is valid to separate them for a number of reasons. And the portrayal of the doctor/lawyer couple benefiting disproportionately from government giveaways is also odd. Such a couple is most likely in the top tax bracket and is paying their share for NPR and the NEH. Furthermore, NPR is not some service for rich people -- it's free. Also, as others have pointed out, government funding for NPR is a small portion of their total revenues and its absence would not destroy public radio. Anyway, our hypothetical lawyer and doctor can easily afford a subscription to whatever news/culture service that they desire (radio, TV, or print). Also, financial aid is often means-tested. Maybe the lawyer knows how to get around the rules, but if he doesn't, then he isn't getting a lot (and the amount of money involved is probably of small concern to these masters of the universe). So then we get to the services provided by the cities. Well first, as indicated in this essay, the inner cities are convenient ghettos for the poor. Or do you think that the poor would just disappear if cities didn't exist? As for economic value, there is plenty of employment in many cities that is not associated with management of the underclass. Finance. Corporate HQ. Engineering/technology firms. Hospitals (and associated research). Ports. And of course, many people actually live their lives in cities, and don't need to justify their existence to some random blogger.
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Nov 9, 2010