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ai_vin
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The caveat here is that these chassis don't look like they could offload a module themselves, they wouldn't even have a driver to unhitch a trailer like a semi does. Anywhere I've worked the delivery trucks all came with at-least a hand truck or cargo dolly so the driver could unload the freight. This idea only shifts those duties to the destination points which are going to need new personal, equipment, and space to do that.
No worries of them using FFs here. A quick look at their 'group of partners—Hydrogenics, LBST, Neas Energy, and Hydrogen Valley' shows a strong investment in renewables.
"The remaining 20 trucks will be allocated to the company’s recently-announced Surrey, British Columbia sustainable fulfillment centre, which is set to open in 2022. " Oh good, I've been wanting to see these trucks in action.
As E-P says great savings could be had by moving cargo by rail but as Harvey says there is problem where the rail ends, the last mile problem. The answer may be in road/rail vehicles; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road%E2%80%93rail_vehicle Like the Blade Runner; http://www.silvertipdesign.com/
" the Administration claims" I wouldn't give you a wooden nickel for anything this Administration claims.
@Lad & @SJC Don't let perfect be the enemy of good. To not burn fossil fuels would take electrifying the nation's rail network but Canada has the fifth-longest rail transport network (46,552 km) in the world. The top 10 countries by rail transport network size are: United States, China, Russia, India, Canada, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Argentina, South Africa. It will take time and money to switch over while this is a quick fix for the meantime.
Actually, the idea of injecting small amounts of hydrogen into the intake to clean up an engine's emissions is old hat. So much has already been done elsewhere they don't have to spend much more to try it in a new application.
Only the involvement of Clariant is news here. I've known about this tech for a decade.
There's more to bitumen than oil. Whether they refine it into fuel or turn it into plastic there's still a lot waste left over. In 2013 the tailings ponds from the Alberta oil sands covered an area of about 77 square kilometres (30 sq mi). As of this year, there's about 340 billion gallons of toxic sludge sitting in those ponds. More of that we don't need.
" recent data show a decoupling of economic growth and transportation energy demand" So they were lying to us when they said limiting fossil fuel use would ruin the economy? I'm shocked, shocked I tell you. :/
In America the *average* car trip is less than 30 miles (one way) but 93% of all actual trips are less than 100. With an electric-only range rating of 33 miles this just barely covers the statistically average car trip and would still need destination charging to get home.
I'm not a Quebecer so this doesn't effect me and as I live on the west coast cold weather range isn't that big of an issue. My problem is different - I need my BEV "toad" capable. For those who don't know, a toad is a car you tow behind a RV with all 4 wheels on the ground. A Tesla can't be towed like that, it has to be put on a trailer. Get into an accident and you have to call a flatbed. Other EVs can only be towed with the driven wheels on a dolly.
There is no reason why these CNG buses can't run on renewable natural gas; https://www.fortisbc.com/NaturalGas/RenewableNaturalGas/Pages/default.aspx Many of the city's vehicles already do.
Robotic arm nothing! Knowing Musk the truck will transform and stand up like Optimus Prime to hand over its own papers.
Thomas, please reread the article. "The mid-size van is thus suited for city-center use by delivery companies, tradespeople and public transport providers." If it stays on city streets why would it need to go faster? OTOH, the customer can choose between two options in top speed: "If more speed is needed, the customer can choose a top speed of up to 120 km/h (75 mph)."
On the semi's 500 miles range: At 70 m/h (interstate speed) that's a 7 hour shift right there. Let's give the driver a 1/2 hour break to eat at a recharge station and the truck's got it's range boosted back up to 400 miles. There's another 5.7 hours. https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-service/summary-hours-service-regulations
@ eci Where does it say the pickup would have a solo driver's position? Musk said his pickup would be big enough to carry another pickup: The track width of an F150 is 67 inches ball park, center to center of tire so add say another 8 inches for wheel width so 75 inches between the Tesla’s wheel wells would work. The box would need to be 80 inches on the inside above the wheel wells to fit the F150 body width. With that much width to work with where's no need for a central driving position and you could have 3 people side-by-side up front easily.
With all of the hoopla surrounding Tesla’s new semi-truck, not to mention the surprise unveiling of a next-gen Roadster, it was easy to miss Elon Musk show off the first official renderings of Tesla’s long-rumored pickup truck. During the special media event, Musk briefly showed crowd attendees a somewhat odd concept of a pickup truck big enough to carry a traditionally sized pickup truck. As Musk intimated, the design is essentially a mini version of the Tesla Semi with 4 wheels instead of the semi's 6, meaning it would not need a truck drivers license. Also Musk has tweeted the pickup could be the base for a cargo van. I would go for one of those, it would make for a great Class B motorhome.
What gets me is that Lamborghini is yet another member of the Volkswagen Group. "Volkswagen" means "People's car" in German. Since when do the people get to drive a Lambo?
But Capitalism SHOULD be about global this and people that because even when a company isn't thinking about the costs they are externalizing SOMEBODY has to pay them. I'm all for more organizations adopting the triple bottom line framework to evaluate their performance in a broader perspective to create greater business value. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_bottom_line
The idea that diesels have a lower CO2 output than gasoline comes from their higher efficiency. But the numbers don't include the output of carbon black. In todays "clean diesels" CB is caught by particulate traps, and burnt off outside the engine. Question: what does carbon black become when it's burnt off? CO2 perhaps?
Yes sd, the amount of renewable energy is about 8.4 % in the United States while nuclear is about 20 %. But that's only part of the story. RE is very new and hasn't had the advantages fossil & nuclear have - until recently. Some forms of RE are now at price parity and their grid mix, which stared from nearly 0 only a few years ago, is growing fast. But nuclear, which we've had for 50+ years, has been sitting at 20 % for how long?
I'm just going to put this out there in the 'let's not reinvent the wheel' folder. There is a company in England; http://www.parrypeoplemovers.com/ that makes hybrid light rail trains which uses station stops for recharging and flywheels for energy storage. In urban zones, with their closely spaced stops, the trams have zero emission operation. And on longer runs with fewer stops the much smaller engine can still use low carbon fuels like propane, CNG, hydrogen, etc.
What I'd like to see is a PHEV Transit with the long wheel base & high roof. It could be outfitted like a RV and the battery could also be used for house power. A battery with a 30 mile range would make for weeks of boondocking.
I could use this. And yes Harvey, there is room for more batteries: These vans have a spare wheel under the floor between the rear axle and bumper. That could be hung on one of the back doors and a battery pack put in its place. That would bump the electric range up to 80 km easily.