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Alex Hens
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it's football - a business that demonstrates time and time again that morals and ethics are as alien to them as the liking of Goats Cheese is to me. But Symon's right - the shortcoming of the plan is in underestimating human spirit. This kind of approach happens all the time in business, but when you're talking people then to anyone other than the most mercenary it'll quickly turn into a form of salary slavery. For most players it's about getting game time and getting as far as they can - it's about satiating that competitive lust as well as their ego. Even the most arrogant players appreciate they have a finite window of opportunity to be the best they can. And if they believe that that's premiership football then being loaned out to Barnsley can quickly take the shine off what should be their prime years (no disrespect to Barnsley), and that's a feeling they won't be able to shrug irrespective of the number of cars they have on the drive of their overly blinged up mansion. Money can buy you many things - Mr Nahyan will be well aware of that fact - but it can't buy human spirit. Flesh? Sure, but not someone's heart - and that's something even, or indeed especially, the best players in the world can't do without.
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Great post Andy - but in your choice of the clownfish - sea anemone analogy I couldn't help thinking of it like so many traditional large company Recruitment Consultants operate. For sure they protect from some nasties- but, certainly in the past, it was so often the case that they sat there, not doing much and feeding the client (sea anemone) on a diet of shit. Not very balanced, and whilst the sea anemone survives, it's the clown fish that get's fat. Now I know I'm probably just being argumentative for the sake of having a cheap shot at the big tie brigade - as I say I very much agree with the overall sentiment - but as a lover of all things analogous in discussions I'd suggest that the relationship is more like a flower: The flower's job is to make itself as attractive as possible to catch the attention of insects/birds/bats and then also provide sweet nectar to both nourish enough to encourage repeat visitation and telling their "mates". So in this analogy the plant is the company/product - the pollinator is the potential applicant/consumer - and the flower is the clear employer/product brand and/or specific messaging - the nectar is the content that should keep them coming back as well as telling others (engagement) - the pollen is the recruitment or purchase message. maybe :)
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quick response: no - it can't replace your Careers site. But yes - it could replace a campaign site. I'm no expert on building face book pages, but I can't imagine you're able to create the same experiential journey as you might on your own site, you'll also certainly loose significant tracking capability (wouldn't you? can you tag as effectively?). However if you're willing to accept working within someone else's templates (such a shame when the execution you can build yourself could be so much more exciting, alluring and engaging with modern web build) and effectively give up quite a bit of control to a SoMe platform that could change it's user policies at a whim (as it has in the past I believe) - then maybe the cost saving and "switch on" target audience friendly capability is compelling enough for you. Be interesting to see for sure - and such public musing may stop clients spending a ridiculous amount of money trying to create their own FaceBook rip off design and functionality, missing the main point: FaceBook works because it's an established platform - not because of how it looks/works! Have to say though - if you want an ATS to integrate and give the candidate a seamless experience (as Peter has mocked above) then I know HARBOUR wouldn't have a problem with that (apologies for unashamed plug). Always looking for new challenges and ideas to execute :)
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Congrats Andy. Looks like you've delighted a client through a forward thinking yet pragmatic and thorough approach to their recruitment, overhauling what they do from the bottom up without losing focus of what's important (the candidate & the hire) and demonstrating how they can take pride back in a job well done. I reckon they'll find their retention for those recruited through this campaign probably improves too. Here's hoping they keep going along on what you've showed them to be the enlightened path and I look forward to reading more such case-studies from you in the future. Go Sirona! :)
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Great share Rob - love it :)
Sick. Horrible. Distasteful. Disgusting - just a few of the words that initially spring to mind for this. I checked the date hoping it was an April 1st post from you. I mean these are people's lives and livelihoods. And what sort of business is willing to have itself run into the ground by viewers (and from Big Brother experience we all know how sick the viewing public can be from behind their texted vote) - although I'm not completely certain from your post whether it's the employees themselves or the public that decide - either way it's a business that clearly deserves to fail. I sometimes wonder if we've actually evolved at all as a race since people were thrown to the lions for fun and we all crowded around city squares for a good beheading - Endemol seem set on making a living proving that the answer is ultimately, at the lowest common denominator level, "not really". :-(
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I dunno - I don't see it necessarily as a terrible thing, and certainly don't see it as a "slippery slope" to anything really. Discrimination is bad for companies as it may mean the best person, the person who will most positively impact the business based on their ability, is not getting the job. So anything that takes a further step to minimising the opportunity for that to happen (be it conscious or subconscious discrimination) by individuals can't be a bad thing from both a "being right for society" as well as "being right for the business" perspective. Obviously once an initial sift is conducted there is still plenty of room for such discrimination to creep into the process, but you'd imagine that having invited a person to interview and then marking them down for no good reason becomes more obvious to spot as a trend. Anyway - in these days of ATS then it shouldn't be a particular bother to just hide the name from the initial sift. Hell, if the ATS is as flexible as it should be (certainly as flexible as ours is - pardon the plug ;) then why not establish a test where you ensure it doesn't in any way affect the facility's efficiency but does compare two like processes/parts of the business to see if there are any diversity bias patterns. There will always be work arounds for the hard wired bigots - but you'd hope those people (and attitudes) stand out enough in other ways and are treated with appropriate intolerance back. I think this kind of approach might help highlight subconscious discrimination and as it comes to light allow appropriate education of those who are, through unwitting actions, holding back the business by excluding appropriate candidates based on their own deep seated preconceptions. I'm not perfect (far from it - ask the Mrs), but whilst I make a concerted effort to be fair in all my dealings I'm certain at times some prejudice creeps into my thought making processes (especially around 6nations time when Wales are playing England ;). If that was affecting my company or a company I worked for negatively then I'd absolutely want to know this so that once aware of it I could ensure I worked around it - not least because my conscious mind knows it's wrong and wouldn't want to be associated with such behaviour. I'm not afraid of my flaws as a human (we all have them), but I do appreciate the opportunity to recognise them/have them highlighted and work them out as best I can. So sorry Andy, we so often agree, but in this I don't read that Lynne is in any way trying to remove the human element of choice, or indeed doing anything that a decent, fair and open-minded recruiting professional needs fear. Perhaps your knickers are twisted unnecessarily on this one ;)
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As you say - this has already been discussed, and at quite some length on this blog too didn't we? And, if I recall, at the time I did forewarn that the profile of Video CVs as "part of the recruitment process" was only going to increase over the coming year as those who have bet their mortgage on it's success (following on from the lead in America) try with all their PR might to push it as "the next natural step". Video CVs are wrong, uncomfortable and unecessary - no matter how you try spinning the stats from sites like YouTube etc. It's just not the same thing. I just feel sorry for those people who, probably through desperation in the current economic climate, waste money they'd quite honestly be better of putting on a horse rather than with some, I don't doubt in some instances well intentioned (some people can't help but believe their own hype) but all the same unfortunately deluded, "quick buck" Recruitment Consultants and the swelling numbers of "there's a gap in the market" video CV companies. Oh dear - am I sitting on the fence too much again? ;-)
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I'm not a recruiter so can only approach this from a personal "what if" perspective, but surely there are things that the recruiting company can do to go the crucial step further. Now of course long term Jo's right - it's about getting the right HR strategy and establishing and communicating the right Employer Brand, because that's what makes the difference when it's the hard conversion in tough times (all too easy to over look / ignore the importance of in good times or for "easy hires"). But if I was in one of these candidates shoes what would worry me? Well it's as David says - it's that I'd take the job but lose my built up safety net. If things don't work out for whatever reason then all of a sudden I've got a month's notice and the "worst economic climate since the war" in which to find a job. Ummm - no thanks. So let's be creative - if you want me so much let's see you share the risk too (which I appreciate they kinda are overall, but from a "me me me" perspective, and given it's me they need, then I'm not sure they are). Create a contract that matches my severance package at my current place for the next 18months - or as best you can (I'm not an employee contracts person either). It seems to me that they're willing and have tried to match every positive element for the candidate, but in a media fueled doom and gloom world, self preservation comes first every time, and what they haven't addressed is the "worst case scenario" concerns. I mean how much of a kicking would you get if 2 months after starting a new job that promised the earth and "you just had to take" you had to go home and tell the Mrs (or indeed Mr) that it was indeed "all too good to be true and the business is actually faltering", or that "it just isn't working, the boss and I actively loath each other and I've been let go" and that "yes dear, you were right, I should have stayed put, now do you know if Tesco are recruiting for shelf stackers to see us through until I find another decent job"!!!! All these fat cats (and football coaches) we hear of have these massive golden parachutes, well maybe it's time for these kind of positions (if they really are that key & can't be succession filled internally) to have modest parachutes of their own. And I'm not talking about rewarding failure - just reflecting the economic times we're in. And anyway - if your recruitment process is that good and you've got the right person then you'll not need to worry about paying out on deploying that parachute. Just a thought.
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lol excellent indeed :D
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well I'm glad you're a 2nd level contact - that means I can blame my being a 3rd level on you :) Also - as one of her interests she has "footing". Now is that her poor grasp of the English language or am I still just a naive boy from the valleys??!!
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I wonder whether the Recruitment Agency industry has actually done itself too much harm in regards to the public perception of its integrity over the years to actually generate enough interest in this kind of model from the wider public? Let's face it - most people have Rec Consultants ranked somewhere alongside Car Sales & Estate Agents (and I know people in both those industries who are the exception that prove the rule - but still a national stereotype is a stereotype for a reason). Any such service would certainly have to be on a "no result no fee" basis you'd think - but that test of true pay per performance, especially where the Consultant would really need to believe in the candidate's ability both on paper and in interview, may be a step too far. All that said - maybe as the recession bites there may be a market for such services as those middle class professionals made redundant become increasingly desperate, but the problem will be that you can't polish a metaphorical turd of a CV, but if you're charging cash up front then who's going to be honest enough to give the truth back. This recruitment practice already exists - agents for actors (possible because they move from short term contract to short term contract) and also for sports personalities (where the contract value is so high a modest %age of the sign up fee is enough to keep anyone in Armani suits for quite some time), headhunters to a degree as well migrant workers (as pointed out by Jo). But as far as I can foresee I think it will probably remain the practice of the both extremes of the market with mass offer advice rather than personal service the best you can hope for in the middle ground is broad brush tips and advice services - particularly now sites like TheLadders.co.uk are about with it very much part of their revenue model. Interesting muse though :)
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I think we are – and I think even the Americans are too (other than the over ego’d self adoring minority – and those who it’s hard sold to). Just to be clear though – I don’t mean that I think it’ll be here as in “be here and part of every day”, but rather as in “the people trying to flog it as the next big thing” will be here in force in 2010. Cheezhead in the states has been crackling for some time (in it’s pure press release form) with news of these kinda sites – including some of which are UK based (http://www.cheezhead.com/2009/01/27/jc-talent-on-view/) ERE.net similarly has carried an abundance of such “Ra Ra for video” type artices – and example here: http://www.ere.net/2008/12/18/video-is-about-to-become-king-are-you-ready/ - “From as far back as the first CD/ROMS, candidates have been intrigued by the idea of submitting their resume in a video format” – no they haven’t. More accurate to say that some people have been intrigued by the idea of trying to flog such a facility to unsuspecting mugs. There are thankfully some voices of reason over State-side – Fistful of Talent do a good job here: http://www.fistfuloftalent.com/2008/12/video-resumes-only-if-youre-ready-to-push-your-chips-all-in.html But I’m afraid even some home grown bloggers have perhaps got themselves a little caught up in the excitement of trying to appear the most bleeding edge, jumping on a sales band wagon as it crests the far off horizon: http://www.carveconsulting.com/blog/index.php?title=an_interview_with_visualcv_com&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1 (must remember to push Paul about what he really thinks when next we catch up). So it’s definitely one to watch – if only to be amused at some moments of pure muppetry as some well meaning if slightly deluded individuals ruin their own personal brand right across the web for all to see (does my enjoyment of this make me a bad person?) ;-)
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2009 on Should you put your photo on your CV? at Sirona Says
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I agree - absolutely not. And for the same reasons I'd say the same thing applies to video resume's (the current darling of the web stuff & nonsense brigade (mostly heralding from America at the moment it would seem, so watch out for them to hit here in 2010)) - unless of course you're applying for Big Brother in which case you probably need counseling more than a job.
Toggle Commented Jan 29, 2009 on Should you put your photo on your CV? at Sirona Says
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I think the whole site is very nicely put together. Well done Next & whoever they worked with on it - certainly one of the best I've seen in a long time in terms of content and overall design execution. Think there are a couple of bugs (e.g. interactive retail job map didn't really work for me), but overall very nice indeed. anyone know who did it? Great work.
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I hear you - and I know that's always been the case - but to quote some curly headed bloke who I've never thought could sing - "Times, they are a changing". In the past it's been all too easy to ignore the effect of an Employer Brand on your Product Brand (and indeed vice versa) - or indeed far too difficult to really pick up on it let alone track the effect of it. Now (and increasingly so) by plugging into the groundswell (as the Marketing department are having to do to at last put some deep quant analysis into their ROI) they'll become aware of the EB related noise out there and the part it plays in peoples’ perceptions (what I like to call the Living Employer Brand). And once on the Marketing Departments radar they'll soon start paying attention and realising this is too important for them not be influencing and / or leveraging. They're doing it now in some small way - they're just probably not aware of what it is they're doing. One would think that Argos Marketing / PR was at least aware of last years Facebook sacking debacle, certainly by the time it ran in the UKs biggest selling paper (http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article263447.ece). Did it negatively impact the product brand - probably not in this case (although ironically I think it would have the employer brand) - but this is what I mean about the need today and tomorrow for joined up management of Engagement across a company. I think for the vast majority of companies the two brand elements are intrinsically linked, and as soon as that penny drops (maybe by a Marketing Department making work for themselves in a "quieter" period?) then don’t you think that there’ll be someone in Marketing who'll want to take control of that aspect of their Brand too? Especially as they increasingly realise that their Brand is not actually theirs to control at all but rather something that the public owns and something they in the main just influence (a very web2.0 debate that one I give you). So smart companies, understanding just how much they need to exploit every possible engagement touch point to positively influence the publics perception of their Brand, will realise that they actually can’t afford to leave EB as the muse of a stretched HR function. Then we’ll see some home page space for careers promotion – and I think a significant increase investment in what EB is really all about: people. Of course there’s always the perspective that I’m just a deluded utopian fool and businesses will simply keep being all short term focussed, in these economic climes as much as at any other – but what can I say: I like my side of the fence ;)
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I believe that with the evolving transparency of real time human interaction (as we increasingly converse, interact and deposit our thoughts and opinions on the web/in the cloud) together with smarter tracking and reporting technologies, those in charge of Marketing budgets will become unable to ignore the truth that within Branding (for most brands - there will of course be some exceptions) Employer and Product Branding is inextricably linked to quite a degree. Once this is realised, probably within the service sector first, I like to think there'll be no battle between HR & Marketing - but rather a single focus within the business that's about Engagement, encompassing customers and employees (both in terms of prospective and actual). Engaged / happy employees = better service = more return custom + positive peer pass on = better business results = enhanced employer brand = better recruitment = engaged / happy employees = .... etc etc Is that really such a ridiculous Utopian dream? Expanded on this a little on my own blog - interested in any comments: http://www.3dmarcomms.com/blog/2009/01/the-future-for-employer-branding-maybe/
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