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Ali Gledhill
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To be fair, Mugabe didn't exactly announce in advance that he was going to be evil.
Toggle Commented Jun 9, 2008 on Looking back ... at CentreRight
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I must admit to being rather scared by some of the comments here. Lawyers are required to defend or prosecute to the best of their ability, and Judges are required to decide cases according to the law. If Judges are making decisions that the legislation was not meant to include, it is the fault of those who wrote the legislation. One cannot accuse Judges of "activism" unless their rulings contradict the law, subject to appeal. Until then, it remains the responsibility of lawmakers to write sensible law. I agree with the commenter above who suggests that the Human Rights Act amounts to "a constitutional logic bomb". It is clearly open to wide abuse, with everyone having a claim to "human rights" within the parameters of the Act. But it is not the fault of lawyers for trying to use it to their clients' benefit, nor of Judges for ruling according to it.
Toggle Commented Apr 13, 2008 on Judicial aristocracy at CentreRight
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Pete | April 13, 2008 at 20:19 "...as is the rightness of the EU. Try listening to Farming Today on Radio 4 for a sickening dose of both most mornings." Farmers benefit from the CAP, without which many of them would no longer be farmers. That doesn't begin to make the CAP a good idea, but it does rather explain why a farming programme might highlight its benefits for farmers.
Toggle Commented Apr 13, 2008 on The BBC and global warming at CentreRight
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"Every profession comes with its own set of cognitive biases. A tendency among its practitioners to a particular way of understanding the world around them." Judges, for example, tend to wish to uphold legislation. As I commented on Tim's piece, I see no signal that judges have been or are issuing judgements that contradict the law. If the executive feels that judges are making their lives difficult, it is up to them to have Parliament make legislation better. The real issue here is that Parliamentary lawmaking is not what it should be - in either chamber. More to the point, an elected House of Lords will make it much, much worse.
Toggle Commented Apr 12, 2008 on Judicial aristocracy at CentreRight
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Judges can only "interpret" law that is unclear. If the Tories want to fix these issues, they should set about amending it. The charge that judges are going above the call of duty is untrue - they are acting exactly as they should, in the cases listed as a check and balance against the executive. Long may it continue.
Toggle Commented Apr 12, 2008 on Rule by judges at CentreRight
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Gladstone: "I predict, Sir, that you will die either by hanging or of some vile disease." Disraeli: "That all depends, sir, upon whether I embrace your principles or your mistress."
Toggle Commented Apr 11, 2008 on In the words of... Benjamin Disraeli at CentreRight
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"In fact, with some tactful PR work we might push this important issue up the agenda." Tactful PR work? Not the best head-start. The BBC article is not too damaging because this is a non-story; the language was not tactful but the point it was trying to make was completely valid.
Toggle Commented Feb 22, 2008 on Here we go again at CentreRight
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The most compelling argument against these is the fact that they would irritate young children. What of the family living above the shop, or those behaving perfectly civilly next door? It is impossible to disperse groups of youths by annoying them without annoying many others at the same time. I agree with the shopkeeper - "I greet [young people] with the same warmth I greet any other customers and I get next to no problems".
Toggle Commented Feb 12, 2008 on Mosquito device at CentreRight
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Great article: all too often the real issues are ignored because of the Punch and Judy of Westminster. However, bus bunching is easily explained. An online simulation shows why: http://www.leatherdale.me.uk/dik/buses.html
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Whatever the strengths or weaknesses of the Mail and Telegraph, the Express is not of a sufficient quality to be a comparable paper. Posted by: Ewan Wauchope | September 03, 2007 at 12:31 Indeed so. Appealing to Daily Express readers demonstrates nothing short of insanity.
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"It was the Sun what won it" springs to mind.
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Posted by: Yet Another Anon | August 21, 2007 at 11:31 I expect the Conservative Party to return to power between 2019 and 2024. 2012 seems much more likely. The electorate is already displaying signs of erratic behaviour: Labour is running out of runway, and the crash will be ugly.
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Posted by: Scotty | August 21, 2007 at 10:02 This analysis is the most depressing and short sighted of all the articles in this series. On the contrary, this is a long-sighted, realistic picture. It is also very optimistic about Tory chances in the future, but realistic about the fact that you cannot magic an electoral victory overnight.
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The next election is not already lost but it is there to lose if this self-destructive introspection is permitted to further confuse the electorate. Winning the next general election is not the be-all and end-all of politics. It can be worth waiting a little longer for power if then you are strong enough to govern decisively. There is a long way to go yet. Play for long-term benefit, not short-term polling.
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The Tories will not win the next election, but are going to get a huge majority at the one after. Remember, Clause IV was only a moment - the process of change went much deeper, over a much longer period of time. Cameron has only started that process: it will take a few years to see the fruits of his labour, under a different leader.
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