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Andrea Nguyen
San Francisco Bay Area
I'm a cookbook author, food writer, and cooking teacher based in the San Francisco Bay Area. My publications include "Into the Vietnamese Kitchen" (2006), "Asian Dumplings" (2009), "Asian Tofu" (2012), and "The Banh Mi Handbook" (July 2014) all published by Ten Speed Press. Additionally, I developed the "Asian Market Shopper" iPhone app with Chronicle Books. A contributing editor to SAVEUR, I also write for the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, and other publications..
Interests: food, wine, history, art, cooking, travel
Recent Activity
Do they have a sodium count on the back? Usually regular, full-sodium soy sauce is about 920 mg of sodium per tablespoon. You can compare the sodium count and dilute the La bo De to come to about 900 mg. Thanks for offering to send me a bottle. I trust your judgment on this one!
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You'd want to mix it with other ingredients -- water and sugar. Is it like a super salty version of fermented soy beans? I'm not familiar with the soy sauce made by La Bo De. I've only bought the fermented soy beans in the tall jar.
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Go for the organic and then look for a different non-GMO certification, if both of those qualifiers are important. That seems sound to me!
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That's interesting. But I notice that Westsoy has USDA organic certification and non-GMO certification.
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I made this chilled tofu and tomato salad (a.k.a. vegan caprese) with homemade tofu. I had fresh soy milk from Nijiya market (a California-based Japanese grocery store chain) that was lingering in our fridge. It’s rich, sweet tasting milk. It’s a delicious product that happens to be made from organic soybeans. There is no indication that the beans were non-GMO. When I buy soy products like tofu and soy milk, I note whether or not the beans are organic and or non-GMO. I don’t have to check off both boxes, however. Sometimes, I let it go. For example, my favorite soy sauces don’t qualify their soybeans as anything but soybeans. I judge food ingredients based on whether or not they are good tasting, consistent, and... Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Viet World Kitchen
Just the inside, Tess. There's no need to oil the handle too. Thanks for asking!
Toggle Commented 7 days ago on My New Cooking Light Column at Viet World Kitchen
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Your mom deglazed with tea? Genius. I bet the tea tannin got the pan clean. I know what you mean about a well-seasoned carbon steel wok. It's a family heirloom. You worked hard to get it all non-stick. Nowadays, I barely use my regular non-stick skillets.
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2017 on My New Cooking Light Column at Viet World Kitchen
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You are too kind. I'm lucky to have you in my camp! Thank you!
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2017 on My New Cooking Light Column at Viet World Kitchen
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I bought mine at a Bharat Bazaar in Santa Clara. It's now closed. Try India Cash and Carry on El Camino Real in Santa Clara: http://www.indiacashandcarry.com/ https://www.yelp.com/biz/india-cash-and-carry-sunnyvale If they don't have it, ask the clerks.
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I’ve been a subscriber and occasional contributor to Cooking Light magazine for years. I’m not necessarily a low-cal cook but I do value healthy eating.That’s how my parents raised us -- to eat balanced meals and cook at home (that’s where the good food is). Who’d know that such an ethos would evolve into a dream career for me? But it remarkable has, along with my interests in culture, history and heck, the human experience. Last spring, Cooking Light magazine’s editor in chief, Hunter Lewis, invited me to be a regular contributor: Would you like to have a column in the magazine? Uh, YESSSS! But then I countered: Would I have to talk about Asian food all the time? Thoughts ran through my mind. I’m... Continue reading
Posted Aug 12, 2017 at Viet World Kitchen
Randy, I totally understand your desire to downsize and simplify. I gave away a bunch of books and was so proud of myself. But a few weeks later, I got more. My shelves nearly groan with books. One of the things about having mobile devices is that I check into the NYT and WSJ sites on the latest news. So along with reading the physical paper, I'm strangely addicted to the digital versions too. But I do want to read more books because they transport you to another place. Ah, I know John T so I can hear his voice already! Thanks for the Serious Eats links, Randy.
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Hi Leah, what a great tip!!! You're so smart to approach the recipe this way. Thank you for sharing. Yes, it's not just for Paleo people!
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“I now understand Jack and the Beanstalk,” my husband said, looking out at our bushy green bean plants in the garden. I expanded our growing space this year with galvanized steel beds so we’re growing triple the amount of green beans as we have in the past. I typically plant French filet beans but for 2017, I went for Blue Lake 274 and they are prolific. Every three days, my husband goes outside and picks beans. When he comes inside, he’s holding a colander full of green beans. We parboil them and keep them in the fridge to eat as is or to stir-fry or add to other dishes. After about three weeks of boiled green beans, I was feeling a little desperate for something... Continue reading
Posted Aug 2, 2017 at Viet World Kitchen
Ha. You are too kind, Stein. That's the amount of oil. The skin releases fat and the flesh releases liquid so things start cracklin'. You can add more oil, if you like. I just had the small amount. It depends on your skillet.
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Earlier this year I vowed to read more than just newspapers and magazines. We subscribe to print editions of about half a dozen magazines along with the Wall Street Journal and Sunday New York Times. It’s our way of supporting journalism but there is something wonderful about turning the pages of a bound book. This summer, I’ve been stealing time to read Rachel Khong’s debut novel, Goodbye, Vitamin. The book description does not fully reflect what the book is about – a young woman trying to repair many things in her life while trying to care for her father who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Sound like a downer? It’s a funny book that’s achingly beautiful in terms of how it’s been written, structured, and... Continue reading
Posted Jul 27, 2017 at Viet World Kitchen
That would be something!
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Thank you! Totally unexpected.
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I’ve cooked from recipes in books (obviously!), on the internet (of course), and from food package labels (it’s true!) but never from a wall calendar. No calendar recipe has inspired me as much as the one I recently received from Michelle Tam, a best-selling cookbook author, blogger and undeniably, the Queen of Paleo. She’s also a friend. We met a few years ago on a trip to Vietnam and I realized that she lived nearby in the Bay Area! You likely know of Michelle’s work -- Nom Nom Paleo, a super popular website and cookbook. I do not keep a Paleo diet but I appreciate her efforts to get families to cook, eat well, and lead healthy lives. Michelle and her husband Henry Fong have... Continue reading
Posted Jul 22, 2017 at Viet World Kitchen
I'm sure you'd make a very special rice salad.
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You're a slicer expert and collector. Yowza.
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Make some and share your feedback. I'm sure Bubbies has nothing like it!
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Most people associate pickled ginger with Japanese sushi but it’s prepared and enjoyed in other parts of Asia. Years ago thumbing through a classic Vietnamese cookbook from the 1940s, I came across a pickled ginger recipe that was similar to the Japanese preparation but less sweet. Here’s a Thai recipe that is more tart than sweet and another that’s fancied up with lemongrass and chile (reminds me of the green tomato pickle I make). But the Japanese version (gari) is without doubt the go-to. The commercial gari pales in comparison to homemade, which has brighter flavor and personality. Plus you can tweak the brine according to your taste. The first task is getting the ginger! Typically cooks use young ginger that’s mild in heat and... Continue reading
Posted Jul 16, 2017 at Viet World Kitchen
Terrific idea. Thanks!
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A girl's gotta do what's necessary. I should call that foraging.
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I have a friend in Burlington, VT, and she said it's been a super wet year. I'm sorry to hear that! But this is a way to use tomatoes that you may think are spent. I pick the so-so ones at the end of the season from my garden and make a batch. As for the lemongrass, buy it! Mine hasn't died from neglect but it does struggle (my fault). Maybe fall will be fabulous?!
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