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asianmil
Interests: military history, asia and trying to undertsand how events got the world to how it is
Recent Activity
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Well my wife decided I was definitely crazy this morning when I left for the golden hour in apparent sub-zero temperatures to go to Casuarina Sands Reserve on the Murrumbidgee River, about 20 minutes drive from the centre of Canberra. The drive was quiet, with few cars on the road. Casuarina Sands Reserve itself is a peaceful. little area on the southern bank of the Murrumbidgee River in the Cotter area. There is a sealed-road carpark with flush toilets. The light was not great as the sun was just making it over the surrounding hills at the time I had to return home. What sunlight there was struggled to cast any brightness on the area as there were a few clouds hanging about. With all that said, I am keen to return on a more suitable day as the location was a lovely spot with a lot of potential for birding as well as bird photography. The photos below are not great because of the lighting but I saw today as a good chance to work on the exposure triangle to try to get some good shots. I have also purchased Adobe Lightroom so I am trying out my editing skills as well. As always, I hope you like the photos. Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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I am the first to admit these phots are not in focus. I feel that I missed this opportunity. I was out for my usual walk around Red Hill with my camera this morning as a way to practice with it while also just admiring the wildlife that exist so close to my house. During my walk I heard a group of Noisy Miners squawking their warning call. I saw some Eastern Grey Kangaroos bound away then a rabbit followed suit. Neither of these animals made sense as the cause of concern to the miners, yet the birds were still calling while heading in my direction. I wondered if it was a dog loose who had spooked them. Then I saw the slight red rushing along the ground, realising there was fox out. The Miners were chasing the fox. There were four miners taking turns swooping the fox, while alerting their kin, along with the rest of the area. I realised this scene was approaching the fire trail I was on, and would cross it not far away from me. I switch my camera, took a site, thought I was in manual without checking then I also forgot to focus. Fortunately, I was not in manual and the setting did not focus automatically on the fax. I had done a good enough job in getting the camera positioned so I was ready to capture the action but I had forgotten to check the setting as well as to use the proper focus procedure. Even though these pictures are worse than even my learning standard currently is I wanted to post them as the subject matter is interesting. The fox is easily seen in all three photos while the birds are a bit more challenging. In the top photo the Miner is at about 1 o'clock to the fox, in the middle photo the bird is now forward of the fox at about 11 o'clock while in the final photo their are two birds; one forward at about 11 o'clock and one behind, low to the ground, in the shadow at about 3 o'clock. After they cleared the track I could hear the birds continue on until they were out of ear shot. I suspect the fox did not have a bird breakfast this morning. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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My favourite mammal, and possibly animal is the Tasmanian Devil. I had a laugh reading this story as I felt it was more in line with the Warner Brothers depiction of the Tasmanian Devil. It does, however, go to show just how powerful the bite is off these amazing creatures. A Tasmanian devil has left behind the mangled evidence of its powerful bite after escaping from a cage on a property south of Hobart. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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I went out for another photographing trip to the Jerrabomberra Wetlands at the eastern end of Lake Burley Griffin on Monday, 11 June 2018. There were at least two other people out photographing birds, as well as a number of people with binoculars looking at the wildlife. The wetlands are a wonderful place to wander around while losing track of time, even on a cold Canberra morning. The bird life is always plentiful. As an example of the birdlife, I have started this post with a picture of some Eurasian Coots. I am not sure what it is about these birds but I find them a beautiful creature. Maybe it is the basic black plumage. In photographing them, I have really been drawn to their red eyes against the black plumage. I know it is wrong to anthropomorphise animals but those eyes make me think they have, what can only be described as, an evil eye. Continue reading
Posted Jun 13, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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On the afternoon of Saturday, 10 June 2018, I was out walking around my local area trying our a new tripod I had purchased that day. Unfortunately, I had waited too long before going out so I missed the afternoon sun. While I was walking the last rays where just striking the slopes of Red Hill, so I knew I did not have much decent light left. When I was walking past the Federal Golf course it was hard to miss the flocks of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and Corellas on the greens, as well as a number of kangaroos. There was one brave golfer who was not yet ready to hand the links over to the wildlife shift before he finished his final holes. I used the birds as subjects for some telephoto work with my tripod, even though the light was not the best, hence why these shots are grainy. I was not going to post them but I had to share the playful Corellas. Initially I thought these Little Corellas were eating, with maybe the odd squabble, until I noticed the swinging flag. I then realised that some birds were enjoying swinging not just on the flag pole but also on the flag. I cannot be certain these birds were playing but it looked a lot like playing to me. If the Federal ever wonders why they go through so many flags I guess they know the reason now. A fun way to say goodbye to the day. Continue reading
Posted Jun 11, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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David Attenborough's Tasmania is up on ABC iView until 3 July 2018. The documentary does not contain much for bird enthusiasts, mainly a brief mention of Cape Barren Geese as well as a segment on Little Penguins but it is a stunning piece of work. David Attenborough did not make this program, he is the narrator. The program is a first time effort by Max Moller, whose company was a co-producer. Although the animals are indeed interesting, portrayed with some truly incredible camera work I could not help but see the true star was Tasmania itself. The beauty of the landscape made every vista a painting worth spending time viewing. The ABC uploaded a brief story about five things the documentary showed about Tasmania's fascinating fauna. Viewing the program only takes an hour, which will fly by given the beauty of the subject matter. I hope you can enjoy it before it is removed from iView on 3 July. Continue reading
Posted Jun 11, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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I enjoy going out for a Sunday morning walk as many birds are starting their day with birdcalls as well as feeding. People are also very understanding, when they see me taking photos, they wait for me to finish so that they do not scare the birds. Canberra has a wonderful assortment of birds making any morning walk an enjoyable experience. I was happy with this morning's walk as I was able to get some good photos of Australian King Parrots and the there were even some female Satin Bowerbirds out. Continue reading
Posted Jun 3, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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Being completely honest, today was not the best day to head to the south of the ACT looking to photograph birds. While the temperature was recorded at 10 degrees, the gusts of wind from the south up to 50 kph gave an apparent temperature of 4 degrees, if not cooler. There was also a mist hanging around that added to the cold. The birds were smarter than I, they mainly seemed to be sheltered somewhere away from the prevailing conditions. This post is a bit light on for birds but hopefully it is still of interest. I was annoyed that I could not take all the photographs I wanted as I did see what may have been a hawk causing some magpies a bit of concern. Eventually the magpies chased it off but I was too far away to confirm what I was seeing let alone photograph it. Still, it was nice to be out in Namadji National Park taking pictures, which I hope are still worthwhile. Continue reading
Posted Jun 2, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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The ABC has a funny story up on its website about a curious Sulphur-crested Cockatoo: A camera set up to monitor the traffic has copped an eyeful of nature after a curious cockatoo was filmed continually popping its head in and out of frame. Continue reading
Posted Jun 1, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
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Canberra is a wonderful place to look at birds. The bush capital really does live up to its name. This is my second time living in Canberra with 20 years separating those two periods. I think the city thrives on the idea that the bush is never far away with the several bodies of water helping to sustain the city's wildlife. While Lake Burley Griffin is an artificial lake created by damming the Molonglo River in the 1960s it is rich in birdlife. The ACT government has also preserved an area of wetlands where people can wonder through on established paths to minimise their impact. For bird enthusiasts there are permanent hides at various locations. Even better, the wetlands never close so you can always access them, meaning an early morning photo trip on a chilly Autumn day is a real possibility. This post is to show case some of the photos I took recently on that trip. I hope you enjoy the photos. Continue reading
Posted May 28, 2018 at Blog on Birds in Canberra
Vincent, yes it would be interesting to see how some of the different Samurai style swords fighting against their Western counterparts. A long nodachi against a claymore style sword would be interesting.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2011 on Katana vs Longsword at Go to stage 3
Dat 1, good point about a system having flexibility. In some ways that would be forced onto a fighting system by changes in technology and it would then be up to the system to change. I guess the best example that comes quickly to my mind would be the changes in Western armour with more plate armour causing a change in sword design and then a change in fighting styles.
Toggle Commented Apr 17, 2011 on Katana vs Longsword at Go to stage 3
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Mar 15, 2010