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Mr Wolf
Colorado, USA
Interests: motorcycles, cars, racing, outdoors, hiking, rafting, kayaking, climbing, biking, camping, books, reading, gadgets
Recent Activity
Steve- so how's he putting these Guard guys out there taking heat off ICE? - They won't be armed (at least initially) - They cannot arrest anyone - They cannot detain anyone - They won't be able to stop anyone coming across the Rio So what are they actually going to DO? Feds will likely put out an 'order' saying 'don't bring them to any ICE facility; we're full.' Will TX put them up somewhere? Legally, they cannot stand on the border and prevent someone from crossing it (that's federal purview). If they arm them in ANY way, WH will put those pics on every street corner and turn the tide or up the rhetoric to a level TX won't tolerate. Because racism or something. Posse Comitatus doesn't apply here; these guys will be Title 32, not Title 10. State active duty. The Gov could grant them police powers, but that's not very likely at this point. Again, we're doing something without actually doing anything...
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Texas Governor Perry wimps out at BLACKFIVE
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Not just yet. I want to say tons, but, been advised against it just yet. There is a lot still going on, due to the investigation by MG Dahl.
Toggle Commented 4 days ago on Texas Governor Perry wimps out at BLACKFIVE
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They've just announced that the Governor of Texas, Rick Perry, is going to be ordering 1,000 troops to the border to help 'secure' it. Like hell. According to reports just in after a news conference, ''Texas Adjutant General John Nichols said his troops would simply be "referring and deterring" immigrants and not detaining people -- though Nichols said the National Guard could if asked. "We think they'll come to us and say, `Please take us to a Border Patrol station," Nichols said." THIS is securing the border? The TSA is doing more than this, and they aren't even checking ID's on illegal immigrants anymore. This is a sham. 12 mil a month to post Guardsmen there, and all they'll be doing is tour guides? My suggestion is that they hand them a map to California and send them there. I think that's a fair deal- California sends companies and millionaires to Texas, and they send them immigrants. Gov Perry is running a huge risk, with zero payoff, hoping he'll look 'leader-y'. Granted, he's looking far far more Presidential than the current office, but that's not difficult to do. It may be that should he do anything more than that, he runs the risk of the WH federalizing the guard troops, a-la Little Rock 9, and losing any semblance of control. But what are the chances of THAT? Gov Perry, you are doing zero to address the problem of our borders, or of the illegal immigrants. Time to start over. Wolf Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at BLACKFIVE
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A good friend and camp follower of Blackfive made this little show for us. Those of you who've been subjugated upon a FOB somewhere know exactly what this is about. Any of you with merchandising and manufacturing skills, well, you know where to reach us. Have a great Fourth of July weekend! -W Download All Army PRT Reflective belt policy, version 3 Continue reading
Posted Jul 4, 2014 at BLACKFIVE
Mr Tobin- It's not in what you say. It's what you DO. It's in all of what WE do. Do you set the example for them- do you vote? Do you question campaigns? Do you speak out when these things come up? Do you contact your reps, from local to national? 'Saying' does little but vent. 'Doing' brings attention, brings activity, brings change. Sadly, this is where we are today- because too many people just stayed home. "All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing"
Toggle Commented Jul 2, 2014 on What Do I Say? at BLACKFIVE
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Unfortunately, this guy likely won't see a courtroom anytime soon, if ever. IF he lives long enough (depending on where they hold him) the prosecution faces issues from Khattala's lawyers of who authorized incursion into Libya, what authority, how did they get extradition, legality of seizing someone from foreign country not in declared war, evidentiary issues, witness issues, etc etc. He'll rot in a hole somewhere before they ever get him to a public trial. They might get him to cough up some intel, but they won't be able to use it in court (based on an assumption that he'll make some deal). It's good that they caught him and they demonstrate the long arm of the US reach, but what overall good do we get out of it? It could also potentially turn into a PR disaster. I chuckle at the thought he stands up and declares ''We saw the video! We decided death to America, and ran to the nearest embassy!''
Toggle Commented Jun 17, 2014 on Benghazi suspect captured at BLACKFIVE
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Put this in your mind to consider: if the US sends drones or even aircraft to fly CAS, we'll basically be flying cover for the Iranian Guard. Think about that. US flying cover for the mullahs. Conflicts make strange bedfellows
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This is where maneuver becomes the winning strategy. The only way this plays out to the Iraqi's benefit is that there are not nearly enough insurgents to hold all that ground; Mosul, Tikrit, Fallujah, Ramadi, etc. Likely the best way to get this turned around is as insurgents flee captured areas, and head toward Baghdad (where we all know they're heading) the Iraqi forces need to lift and drop into those captured areas behind them. Make them lose their gains, or, expend much much more effort to hold them, distracting forces from moving on Baghdad.
Toggle Commented Jun 11, 2014 on Losing the peace in Iraq at BLACKFIVE
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This will not end easily, soon, or prettily. Mosul will be a flashpoint- due the the Arab re-settling that went on here (to push out Kurdish influence) there is a larger amount of Arab presence here than in other areas of Northern Iraq. Taking this town gives ISIS access to the biggest nugget of all- the gas and oil lines flowing northward out of Kurdish territory. There is a very very good chance this will be the straw that send Iraq into separate pieces- Sunni, Shiite, and Kurd. Report have that troops are being massed to move from the Baghdad areas and southern areas up towards Mosul. That would then leave those areas devoid of support, and ANOTHER type of strikes will occur. It could have a domino effect. Erbil (Irbil) is to the east of Mosul; only about 100 miles or so, and is in the heart of Kurdish territory. It is also the economic hub of the area, having built one of the largest and most substantial airports in the entire region, entirely financed by the Kurds. They have been acting somewhat autonomously from Baghdad's central government, and have pushed forward strong economic advances. Kurdish areas have been the most stable of the entire country. That, I'm afraid, is about to change. If 500k people are truly being displaced out of Mosul, most will head toward Erbil, down into Tikrit, and some all the way into Baghdad. To give you some scale, when Fallujah I occurred in April 2004, we were dealing with about 48k displaced persons. It was complete and utter chaos. Up it by a factor of 10, and you have REAL trouble. ISIS has been building for some time across Syria and northern Iraq. If they manage to hold onto the resources they 'acquired' in Mosul, you will likely see eastern Syria and Iraq folding into one entity; hopefully not a full-on caliphate. And oh- I wouldn't worry TOO much about all those Humvee's and things they got; given their lack of ANY sense of maintenance, they will probably last about a week. The aircraft? I'd be SHOCKED if they could get one started, let alone coax it off the ground...
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Solomon- I said I'm not defending him. At all. I have NO, NONE, ZERO knowledge of his intent nor his emotions at the time. As he is alive, HE can and will answer for them. Hopefully, to the full extent of the UCMJ. Our mission was SOLELY to find, fix, and recover him. Period. No games, no 'negotiations', just locate and recover by any means possible. Were we going to send in a battalion of Rangers across the border into PAK to accomplish it? No. The political fallout from the bin Laden raid precluded that. Had not PAK had nukes, this would have lasted about a month, not years. Had not our supply lines into AFG so GREATLY depended on PAK and other countries, we could have had other options. The U.S. has turned cowardly in how it deals with protecting its own interests. This swap only reinforces that view. I'm going to add this: based on prior info, that swap involved a LOT of money somewhere. HQN got paid, likely via Qatar, then HQN handed BB to the Talib, the GITMO 5 got freed via Qatar. What still is not clear is WHAT QATAR got out of this deal. No one does anything for free, and the 'wasta' in this is too short-lived to be of any use to them. Is there an arms deal pending here? An intel share of some sort? We will see.
Toggle Commented Jun 7, 2014 on About That Bergdahl Thing... at BLACKFIVE
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People have been asking. I have been delaying. And I'm going to delay some more. Because vindictive. As someone who worked the Sgt Bergdahl issue for 4 years, I have a long, sordid history with this issue. And I WAS going to come out on the topic this week- I had mentioned to several people that I wanted to post up about it. But I've been advised not to, by some people who understand the 'why'. Much has been said- and most of it is inaccurate, if only because we've not heard from either the family, or from Bowe himself. I'm not going to defend him; my mission is done. But until I read something from his team of reintegrators (and I know who they are) I'm holding back. This issue is FAR from over; this isn't going to be gone anytime soon. If you want to read things that I find 'credible' at least in part, head here, here, and here. I won't give reasons as to exactly why, yet, but suffice to say these have more to them than much of the other speculation (outside the direct interviews with his platoon members). I won't give up on this. But the time isn't right. Yet. Wolf Continue reading
Posted Jun 6, 2014 at BLACKFIVE
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BLACKFIVE has been asked to help get the word out on a new film premiering next week by Sebasian Junger- if you recall, his last film Restrepo was a hit- covering the battle in Afghanistan by the 2/503d of the 173 ABN BDE. The film is premiering next week- and B5 readers will have an EXCLUSIVE opportunity to get tickets to it in NYC. More on this soon! But I'm here to tell you about the Denver premier- where Sebastian will appear at the Denver Film Society's opening of the film. DFS, along with VFW Post 1 (as in, THE first VFW post) along with BLACKFIVE are hosting a special event. BLACKFIVE will sponsor a social following the film, and I will get to interview Sebastian along with several members of the 173d who will be there. If you are in Denver or vicinity, COME ON OUT. Here are the links to details, and a bit about the film. I'll post more on this as we get closer- but spread the word. Here is another film on the heroics of the 503d as they faced some of the most intense combat in Afghanistan. From the release material: "KORENGAL follows Junger’s Oscar-nominated film, Restrepo, which he made with the late Tim Hetherington. This feature length documentary follows a platoon of men as they fight in Afghanistan's famed Korengal Valley, often called, "the valley of death." KORENGAL takes a less kinetic, and more visceral look at war, and listens to the thoughts of the men who fight it. The film captures the confusion of war, and the courage and strength of the men, who, like all troops find themselves facing overwhelming danger. The emotions are often conflicting: as one soldier mourns the loss of a friend in combat, another doesn't hesitate to say he would go back to the front in a minute. While the firefights are fierce, there are long periods of waiting for the uncertain. KORENGAL captures the soldier's thoughts on service, war, combat, and brotherhood. KORENGAL is what war feels like. The film was shot by Junger and Hetherington on location in the Korengal Valley. Additional footage was filmed in Vincenza Italy at the unit base of the 2-503, Battle Company, of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. “Tim and I had always envisioned this film project to unfold in two parts. The world has seen the first part of this work, RESTREPO. But when Tim was tragically killed while covering the civil war in Libya three years ago, I was left on my own to finish the project. I re-enlisted the other two members of our RESTREPO team and we went back to work. The result, KORENGAL — which together with RESTREPO completes our vision – is exactly what Tim and I had discussed years earlier,” said filmmaker Sebastian Junger. “As with RESTREPO,” Junger added, “we paid for the entire production ourselves, which gave us complete control of what the film would be. RESTREPO was intended to be a way for civilians to experience what combat feels like. We wanted KORENGAL to be very different. This film strives to impart understanding of the inner psychology of the soldier, rather than being intentionally experiential. How does fear work? What do courage and guilt mean? What is it like to come home from war? Why do so many soldiers miss being at war once they’re home?” The film debuted at the Little Rock Film Festival, and will premiere in NYC on May 30. A national roll out has been planned for late June through early August." Here is the FACEBOOK link: https://www.facebook.com/korengalthemovie And, the Denver Film Society announcement: http://www.denverfilm.org/filmcenter/detail.aspx?id=26569 I hope to see you there! Much more to follow! Continue reading
Posted May 22, 2014 at BLACKFIVE
Ok- what, exactly, is a 'demo landing'? Do the Italians land differently? Or do dustoffs do a different landing procedure? Can't say I've ever been part of/seen a 'demo' landing :)
Toggle Commented Aug 17, 2013 on Photo: Medevac Demo Landing at BLACKFIVE
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Several of my brethren here on B5 have heard me talk about this chick- in my OBC I was classmates of a female 2LT who was an E-6 Drill Sergeant at Ft Jackson. She was squared away in ways many men couldn't even begin to approach. She was the Army rep to the Boston Marathon. Her pt reps worked like a sewing machine- pushups/situps non-stop until time ran out; usually broke more than 80 reps of each. So the physical part was easy for her. She wanted NOTHING to do with being a Ranger or anything like that- but she wanted jump school. Passing the PT portion of Basic Paratrooper was nothing. But she couldn't do the 36-ft tower. Scared the shit out of her. She washed out the second week. JUST like everyone else, you may find that element you can't get past. It may break you, or you will pass the standards. But they may not just be physical ones. Ask ANY Ranger candidate what drove them to the brink; most will reply either the cold in the winter phase, or the lack of food for energy. Certainly the lack of sleep. One thing many forget to mention- LT Murphy was COMBAT PROMOTED to an officer from a sergeant. That didn't happen often. And certainly not to anyone who not only wasn't smart enough, but also strong enough to handle it.
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We have a new king of Mount Badass right there... but of course, how many more pullups could YOU do if you dropped 30 or more pounds off your deadweight yank? ( I keed! I keed! save the emails!) Thats some serious commitment right there...
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That's correct. The U.S. has tacitly admitted that it is using Weapons of Mass Destruction, WMD, in Afghanistan, Yemen, and all other places that it conducts kinetic activity. Iraq? Tons of the stuff was deployed - and by definition, Saddam had far more of it than you could possibly inventory. How? How could a nation so set on PREVENTING the use of WMD end up using it in such huge quantities itself? Simple- the U.S. has basically indicted itself. You see, this past week the FBI released the indictment of one Eric Harroun, 30, known to Syrians as “the American.” According to a story in the WaPo: The complaint says Harroun conspired to use a weapon of mass destruction, the RPG, which carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. He made his initial appearance in federal court Thursday. RPG? WMD? Well, yes, as journalist James Joyner has found out: ...unless RPG technology has improved vastly since I last fired one, there’s no possible way that it should fall into the category. Taking out a tank or a low-flying helicopter is destructive, no doubt, but it ain’t massive. Nor, according to 18 USC § 2332a, would an RPG seem to qualify as a WMD: (2) the term “weapon of mass destruction” means— (A) any destructive device as defined in section 921 of this title; (B) any weapon that is designed or intended to cause death or serious bodily injury through the release, dissemination, or impact of toxic or poisonous chemicals, or their precursors; (C) any weapon involving a biological agent, toxin, or vector (as those terms are defined in section 178 of this title); or (D) any weapon that is designed to release radiation or radioactivity at a level dangerous to human life; Alas, following the trail to section 921, we see that: 4) The term “destructive device” means— (A) any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas— (i) bomb, (ii) grenade, (iii) rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, (iv) missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, (v) mine, or (vi) device similar to any of the devices described in the preceding clauses; (B) any type of weapon (other than a shotgun or a shotgun shell which the Attorney General finds is generally recognized as particularly suitable for sporting purposes) by whatever name known which will, or which may be readily converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive or other propellant, and which has any barrel with a bore of more than one-half inch in diameter; and (C) any combination of parts either designed or intended for use in converting any device into any destructive device described in subparagraph (A) or (B) and from which a destructive device may be readily assembled. So, by the very definition that the U.S. uses to prosecute criminals, we, the good 'ol U.S. of A., is conspiring to inflict WMD across the globe. But how is it possible that the lowly RPG, and by association, the 40mm grenade, the 155 artillery shell, and the 81mm mortar, could be considered a WMD? Read the definition above- if it contains more than one-quarter ounce of explosive, its a WMD. How much do these explosives hold? You can check that here. For example, the M362 HE round contains 2.10 pounds of the stuff. Pretty massive WMD, if you ask me. The asshat Harroun definitely needs prosecuted (see Jimbo's post below)- and introduced to a few new virgins afterwards if he is so inclined to assist (possibly) AQ-associated groups. But to do so under the guise that RPG's and similar munitions are WMD is beyond the pale. What next? Do you see 30-rd magazines being slipped into this definition? Because well, a grenade can kill only 1 person; 30-rd mags can kill up to what, 30? Masses, I tell you. That's mass destruction right there. U.S law has gone beyond the ridiculous here. And we've only done it to ourselves. But want to know something? It gets worse- just ask our good buddy Bob Owens: DOJ prosecutes Army veteran that conspired with wrong rebel group to shoot 10 Syrian soldiers; refuses to prosecute Attorney General than ran guns to narco-terrorists used in 302+ murders So they're willing to prosecute someone who fires ''WMD'' in Syria, but not go after someone who killed U.S. citizens right here in our own back yard? What goes around comes around, and bites you right in the ass... Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2013 at BLACKFIVE
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Ok, I have to admit- I've been struggling with this one. I'm a bit torn, for several reasons which will become clear in a moment. But first, I want to let my good friend CSM Steve Valley say a few words on this book- he took the time to read it and send me a review; Steve and I served in Baghdad together, near the same time as this author David Abrams. I wanted another set of eyes on this to see if it were only my perceptions that were skewed. From the good CSM: I’ll admit, as an Army Public Affairs officer that served in Baghdad for more than a year, I was really looking forward to reading David Abram’s book “Fobbit”. Abrams is a retired Army Master Sergeant that served at Camp Liberty, Iraq in 2005 with the Third Infantry Division Public Affairs Office and if anyone was going to write about the complex workings of the Army’s wartime communications machine from an insider’s perspective then this would be it “Fobbit” received numerous accolades and wonderful reviews by the biggest names in book reviewers including the trio of heavyweights—the New York Times, Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times. This of course made me think in the back of my head that the book is either the instant classic the media portrayed it as (which I really thought it would be considering that a Soldier wrote it) or it was going to be a book that made a joke of my fellow REMFs that did great work even though there never left the Forward Operating Base (FOB) for their entire tour in Iraq. Unfortunately for me, the latter of the two scenarios was the truth as “Fobbit” gave neither an accurate portrayal of a senior enlisted public affairs NCO or for that fact, any Soldier written about in this work. Although “Fobbit” is a novel with supposedly fictional characters, Abrams based it on his journal that he kept during his year tour of duty in Iraq, so I bet you can picture Abram’s former office mates arepracticing their basic rifle marksmanship with his face as the target because of how he portrays them in the book. Before I delve into why this book didn’t measure up to me let me clear the air and say that David Abrams is a wonderfully talented writer that shouldn’t have to worry about signing a multi-project book deal with a major publishing house. He’s master story teller that has got a real gift for prose. The Army has very few of these mucho-talented scribes and it will miss Abrams because he is that good. His words flow magically from page to page and he has created a great work of fiction, the key word being fiction, because in my opinion, this book doesn’t come close to describing how a real public affairs office operated in Iraq looked like. I saw first-hand both a corps/division public affairs office at Baghdad’s Camp Victory and the Combined Press Information Center (CPIC) in the Green Zone and each of them differed greatly from the public affairs shops Abrams describes in Fobbit. I saw great PAOs and some that didn’t know the difference between an off-the-record interview and a live press conference, but both organizations thrived in the daily quagmire working public affairs in Baghdad during one of the most significant periods of times of the war. On a daily basis I worked with lower enlisted Soldiers that completed the most difficult of missions while senior officers navigated impressively through the massive levels of bureaucracy which made it nearly impossible to put out an effective command message, never mind the right message. These people cared about their job and how the war was being portrayed back home, but this facet of conducting public affairs during was was never mentioned by Abrams. Instead, Abrams ridiculed every level of Soldier portrayed in “Fobbit”, from an impatient and micromanaging chief of staff to an incompetent staff of commissioned public affairs officers hiding under their desks to avoid senior leadership, to a completely useless and embarrassing infantry company commander that ends up being the focal point of the story; as if anyone this pathetic would actually be allowed to serve as a commissioned officer in today’s Army. The main crux of the story is how the U.S. military is deciding on how to report the 2,000th warrior killed in action in Iraq. The military is hoping for a story of heroics as U.S. forces reach this horrific milestone, while in actuality the 2,000th killed in action is none other than the utterly useless example of a disgraced infantry captain who was relieved from command after making bone-headed decisions in the field cause innocent Iraqi deaths and his Soldiers immediately losing the little amount of respect they had for him in the first place. The captain ends up the unlucky 2,000th American killed when he’s hit with a rogue mortar while drinking an Australian lager floating on an inner tube in a luxurious pool at Camp Liberty. I remember being at the CPIC in 2004 when we were planning the strategy to announce the 1,000th U.S. military member killed in Iraq and it was nothing like the insincere atmosphere that Abrams writes about. This whole scene irritated me because there is absolutely nothing funny or petty about announcing the death of a fallen warrior in fiction or in real life. In fact, we weren’t even thinking of the story about the fallen warrior, in as much as trying to figure out the right theme and message that the U.S. military wanted to highlight to the American people back home whose support we were on the verge of losing. In my opinion, there’s a logical reason why movies like Green Zone end up being panned by the public while books like David Bellavia’s “House to House” become instant classics---It’s because Americans want to read about factual stories from there service men and women... Continue reading
Posted Mar 30, 2013 at BLACKFIVE
UPDATE 1: B5 sends me a Twitchy link where 'Jennifer' steps all in it again; trying to defend the indefensible; he still doesn't get it right. Another Twitchy link, where the MSM goes all-in, and makes even bigger fools of themselves. Ezra Klein, military benefits commentater? Really? I need to look at writing for the Economist. At least I understand capitalism... Nextly, TSO and the farm team at TAH links 'Jennifer's' article to IVAW and the Winter Soldier crowd; 'Jennifer' the 'investigative reporter' most affected. I'm going all in and call this an outing for Obamacare... Original Post: Hopefully, most of you have read or at least heard about the article in Esquire yesterday about 'The Shooter', supposedly the SEAL that shot Bin Laden. I'm not linking it here, as you'll see why. We here at B5 and other places have been discussing this amongst ourselves, and among some of the operators out there. We have all come to a conclusion: Something ain't right, Jackson. See, here's this SEAL guy, who supposedly was a main character in the single most important mission of the GWOT, who took out the most wanted man on the planet, and he just ups and walks away from it, not looking to ensure he has healthcare or anything? That he has no options BEFORE he walks out? Really? Can he be that stupid? Do people in the military with health issues really leave without any backstop? I doubt it. More like the author, Phil Bronstein, made this thing up, or he was rolled. And I don't mean Rickrolled. Phil, I'm calling you out on this one. And it's not just this singular article. From his Wiki entry: Phil Bronstein is a journalist and editor. He serves as executive chair of the board for the Center for Investigative Reporting in Berkeley, California. He is best known for his work as a war correspondent and investigative journalist. He went on to reoprt from conflict areas around the world as a foreign correspondent for eight years... Peru, the Middle East, El Salvador and the Phillipines. See, he's been in 'conflict areas'. I cannot find any reference or story where he's been in Iraq, Afghanistan, or even Bosnia. But he's a 'war correspondent'. Really? Which war? Was the U.S. involved in it? Talking to warriors does not make you a 'war correspondent'. See Mr Phil, I don't think this is all adding up. As we've seen, ST6 is not a term used anymore; hasn't been for many years. And I doubt he'd be using it just in front of you. Does DELTA still use that name for themselves? Don't think so. That would out a phony pretty quick. The main thing with this article that really burns is that this 'SEAL' is left hanging. I don't think that's the case here. I think either you've been rolled, Mr Phil, or you don't have the full story, or you don't know enough to even ask. See we here at Blackfive constitute a military blog- we have enough experience among us to recognize when something ain't right- and your story ain't cutting it so far. And to me, your background ain't either. Why would a team guy go blabbing to a journo with no military cred, who has basically been hanging out in San Fran all his life? Berkeley, in fact. Not San Diego, where he might meet a few dudes like this over the years and build rapport. Or near Ft Bragg, or in Florida. Hell, even DC. Is it possible that Phil has 'connections' that set him up with this dude, in order to put even more 'spin' for the administration? I'm not going that far...yet. Further in his article for Esquire, Phil quotes the wife: "the loss of income and insurance and no pension aside, she can no longer walk onto a local base... they've surrendered their military IDs." "He's lost some vision, he can't get his neck straight for any period of time..." If this were indeed the case, this is easy stuff to document in the out-processing; and they DO do a medical when you out-process for a separation physical. Period. If his vision, alone, was affected, they'd document it. Neck issues? The x-rays would pick it up. He then writes that according to Shooter, ''if I come back alive and retire, I won't have a pot to piss in or a window to throw it out of for the rest of my life.'' So what do you have now? If Shooter had retired, he'd have an income and med coverage, at a minimum. So he comes back from the 4-month deployment, leaves, and STILL has nothing? He'd have been better off waiting. At 18 years, he could have reached 'sanctuary' and been what we call 'retired on active duty'. More and more issues show up the more I read the article. It's good fiction, but that's all it is- fiction. Phil, I think you'd make a better 'Jennifer' than a 'Phil'. Yeah. Let's call you 'Jennifer'. You don't rate a 'Susan'. For all you vets out there, hit us in the comments if you've ever had, or heard of, someone separating without some medical eval, and going on without ANY coverage if you've served combat and had injuries. I just don't see it. Neither do others I've talked to. If you want, hit me at the email listed in the sidebar and I'll compile it for you. And 'Jennifer', it's time you came clean on this. We need some better explanation or proof... Wolf Continue reading
Posted Feb 12, 2013 at BLACKFIVE
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Chris- thanks for your response. No one is 'punishing' anyone here for any individual 'belief'. You are missing the bigger point here- Self determination If I want to start an organization that will only allow people under 5ft 8in, blue eyes, and white hair to join, I can do that. I can write my by-laws to state that. But to have someone come in and DEMAND that I have to allow people of red-haired pursuasion (and we all know about red-haired people wink wink) or suffer thru countless lawsuits, is a ridiculous position to have to endure. I have started, for example, car clubs, that revolve around specific marques. We were, back in the day, pretty large and successful. To have someone come in (from say, Ford) and DEMAND that we allow other brands to join is also ridiculous. This effort against Scouting is the thought police writ large. Why are they not allowing the NAACP to have Asians join? Asians may be 'colored', right? They're a minority, right? Why aren't they demanding that Islamic American mosques allow co-ed worshipping? Instead of conforming to having women at the back of the building? These groups have agendas. And they will continue to pick on the weakest they can find. I'm waiting for them to take on CAIR...
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McQ- I hope you have a copy of this book. At $2400 bucks a copy, man, it MUST be a good read. Thats nearly 2k above its new-copy original price. THAT is the way to do a book.... GREAT ARTICLE!
Toggle Commented Feb 1, 2013 on Flying the "Sled" and loving it at BLACKFIVE
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Thanks, fellow vet, but by the looks of things, the only BIGOT here is YOU. Check your meds, turn in your weapons, and chillax. 'Atheists' are usually a little more inclusive than you seem to be. And I'm not talkin' about Touch, above, but the 'vet' above him.
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Matt- Thanks for your openness and reply. My the troops I have been involved in included one based in a school, one in a Mormon church, and one in an Episcopalian church (and I am neither- I'm Buddhist). None were 'overly' religious, but all held appropriate prayer, upheld the Oath and Laws, and instilled the respect Scouts are known for. The council was in one of the poorest rural areas of the US, but still managed to have a huge membership. As I look back on it, I feel a certain awe for what the accomplished given the resources they had. I have to address the 'kids of today' comment- these kids need the BASIC morals and guidance that Scouting offers more than ever. Breakup of the core family, reduction in physical activity, obesity, and inability to even perform basic survival skills show the decay they are facing. How, in your estimation, is this 'changing with the times' for the better, in any way???? Kids today are only getting less 'intelligent' overall. Stating that Scouting has to 'get with the times' is a cop-out. Why don't the Marines 'get with the times' and just reduce the standards so women can be in combat? It's the same argument. Kids should aspire to gain the skills and morals of Scouting. Pushing Scouts down to the lowest common denominator helps NO ONE.
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All great points, above. But here is the main thing I wish to point out- that a PRIVATE organization can have its own, private, rules 'overturned' by outside interlopers. As I stated, there is absolutely nothing preventing those outsiders from starting their own groups; they just choose not to because they realize they are not as welcome nor as 'popular'; that by forcing others to their will, they will prevail in expanding their influence. Worse, is that Scouting leadership would even consider it and not address the privacy issue. I agree that Scouting should continue in welcoming all kinds of members; but they should be permitted to select LEADERSHIP as they see fit. One long-time fellow scout of mine had 'parents' who were openly gay; this back in a time when that was absolutely unheard of. None of us boys ever made an issue of it, and he was always welcome in everything we did, and participated in everything; IIRC he even made Eagle. We grew up in a VERY VERY small town (less than 12000 residents) so it was no secret what his situation was. But I can honestly say he never felt out of place with us.
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It's been a while since I've been able to post something here that wouldn't get me in possible trouble (Jimbo, I'm not) but tonite, after getting an email from my local Scouting's CEO, I had to vent. As an Eagle Scout, as a former Unit Commissioner, as someone who has volunteered countless hours mentoring and leading our young men in Scouting, I feel we are finally facing something that threatens the existance of Scouting, and the beliefs of a majority of those involved in it- whether they be leaders or young men. This, this is what I received: Currently, the BSA is discussing potentially removing the national membership restriction regarding sexual orientation. This would mean there would no longer be any national policy regarding sexual orientation, and the chartered organizations that oversee and deliver Scouting would accept membership and select leaders consistent with each organization’s mission, principles, or religious beliefs. BSA members and parents would be able to choose a local unit that best meets the needs of their families. The policy change under discussion would allow the religious, civic, or educational organizations that oversee and deliver Scouting to determine how to address this issue. The Boy Scouts would not, under any circumstances, dictate a position to units, members, or parents. Under this proposed policy, the BSA would not require any chartered organization to act in ways inconsistent with that organization’s mission, principles, or religious beliefs. Under attack are the very morals that are the bedrock of what Scouting develops. I'm no homophobe, nor am I one to go checking peoples bedrooms. Thusly, I also don't believe in forcing anothers morality upon anyone else. I certainly don't go around preaching my beliefs or expecting you to adopt or conform to them. But that is EXACTLY what the Homosexual police are foisting upon us- demanding that those in Scouting bend to their beliefs. Or lack of their 'morality' (depending on your religious point of view). If you are of that persuasion, you are more than welcome to form your own group, and enjoin those that believe as you do. NO one is preventing you from forming the Homo Scouts or whatever you want to call them; Free Scouting, Rainbow Boys, I don't care. That's up to you. But I do expect that you respect MY ideals as much as you want me to respect yours. Period. You know why you don't do this on your own? Because so few people believe as you do that it would not stand. It would not be able to maintain itself outside your own cloistered, insulated areas. If Scouting adopts this, I am of the mind to rescind and turn in my Eagle. I will pull family members from the organization. I will cease all donations to the organization. There have been exactly TWO organizations that I donated to exclusively- Scouting and The Salvation Army. When United Way ceased giving donations nationally to Scouting, I ceased dontating and volunteering for UW (I also ceased giving to the CFC due to its funding of charities I wholly do no believe in.) While Scouting formed my abilities and made me as successful as I am, bending the Scouts of today and tomorrow threatens everything we stand for. One thing I need to address: Scouts are a PRIVATE organization. They are NOT a public entity, and they are not supported by the government. So why should we bend our rules to outsiders? Why do outsiders wish to so vehemently protest ANY rule of a private organization? What is next- that the Legion or VFW will now have to allow ANYONE who served in a uniform to join? I'm going to demand participation in the FOP- even though I've never been a cop. I just feel like joining, and they are discriminating against me. This push against Scouts has something far more nefarious to it- I just don't know what it is, yet. Scouts do not discriminate; we are taught tolerance. We are expected to help one another, and that we do very very well. I grew up in Scouting with people of many religions, creeds, races, beliefs. I expect that a good many of those I grew up with were gay. I never cared- we were too busy having fun to worry about it, and at the younger ages, really didn't have a NEED to know. But outside organizations, hell-bent on forcing THEIR agenda down our throats in such a permissive environment, think that we need to be forced to understand and accept their 'beliefs' and lifestyles. I vehemently disagree. I understand that in the above statement from the CEO that they are not forcing everyone to abide; they are leaving it up to local charters to establish it. What you may not understand is that this is just language to have so that local funding organizations, who contribute a great deal of money to these charters, will have the final say- not National Scouting. This is a complete cop-out. If you look at what has happened to Scouting over the last few decades is that they have been forcing Scouts out of what has established their 'base'- churches, synagogs, temples, meeting houses, EVEN SCHOOLS. They have forced Scouting into a corner; and don't tell me its about 'catching up to the 20th century' either. This is all about taking the Man out of being a man. Don't Ask, Don't Tell worked for the military. It was similar in the Scouts- keep your private self to yourself, you were fine. Scouting builds leaders, men, and families. I see this as another attack on the foundation of the Family in American society. Many of our leaders that we have looked up to have been Eagle Scouts, and proud of it- Pres Ford, Ross Perot, Michael Moore (yes, that one), Rick Perry, Steven Spielberg, Neil Armstrong, Samuel Pierce, Togo West, Gary Locke. This list is VERY long and varied. It doesn't appear that any of them have been in any... Continue reading
Posted Jan 30, 2013 at BLACKFIVE
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BTW, is this any coincidence?? http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/24/us-pregnancies-servicewoman-idUSBRE90N1B820130124 Unintended pregnancies on the rise in servicewomen By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK | Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:15pm EST (Reuters Health) – Just over ten percent of women in the military said in 2008 they’d had an unintended pregnancy in the last year – a figure significantly higher than rates in the general public, according to a new study.
Toggle Commented Jan 25, 2013 on Women in Combat at BLACKFIVE
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