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Brett Bellmore
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In my family we lose it from the middle of the top, out; Generally you're ignorant of the fact that you're going bald until it's far along, due to the fact that the hair that's visible without contortions and/or multiple mirrors is the last to go. A bad sunburn in the spring was my first clue. Now I have to go with short hair, because the hair on the sides is as thick as ever. The Bozo effect kicks in if my hair gets over a couple inches long... "There's a compound in brussels sprouts that he (and both children, it turns out) find horribly bitter, there's nothing that could make them like or even tolerate it. " Used in classes as an example of genetic diversity: You can get test strips for it, some of the class will taste it and make faces, others will find the strips tasteless.
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But that's a purple veggie. ;) Seriously, eggplant is the tofu of the vegetable world; If you don't like it, it's purely a matter of how it was cooked, because the flavor is almost all in how it was cooked. My wife sears off the skin, and after slitting the side flattens it out, and soaks it in whipped eggs. Then she fries it with anchovies, chopped onion, and chopped tomato on top. Very yummy for breakfast with some soy and hot vinegar sauce.
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When I was a teen, not long after we'd moved to the country, my mother was invited over by a neighbor, Inez, to make sauerkraut with her in her basement. Inez thought mom was such a wuss for bringing her son over to do the work of shredding the cabbage. Best sauerkraut I ever tasted, the commercial stuff is nothing like it. I think it was due to the bacteria in her dirt floor basement, after generations of making sauerkraut. It was lambic sauerkraut!
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"When I was a kid, I refused to eat any green vegetables unless they were in a salad" LOL! When I was a kid, I was in rebellion against stereotypical childhood behavior. I transgressed against these stereotypes by eating my veggies without complaint, mowing the lawn without prompting, and so forth. Strangely, nobody noticed my bold act of rebellion. Too meta, I guess...
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"So, let's start from the other angle - why, despite the wildly relaxed gun-ownership laws in the US, is the death toll by gunshot, and the incidence of 'massacres' (multiple, apparently random victims) so extraordinarily high here?" So, why does the death toll by gun-shot, if it's supposedly driven by said "wildly relaxed" gun ownership laws, not more visibly correlate with those laws? Why do we have states with relaxed laws and low death rates, strict laws and high death rates? Why do the murder rates vary by several orders of magnitude between locations with the same gun laws? And, what makes you think the US has a particular problem with mass killings? Just because we have, in some parts of the country, a problem with shootings, and a mass shooting occurs here every few years? Maybe you want to find some statistics on this particular problem before assuming it's worse here?
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The Holocaust happened. That means it's going to come up in even rational discussions occasionally. I'd say this discussion started out failing a rather low bar, given the declaration that articles owned by millions of people have no sane or legal use.
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Well, if you don't want to rationally discuss a topic, shutting up probably is the best contribution you can make, as Countme-In demonstrates. Let us discuss this rationally: We live in a technological society, where individuals have easy access to large quantities of energy, to technology beyond what their efforts alone could produce. This has numerous positive consequences for our lives, it has one rather unfortunate consequence: Anybody, if they are so inclined, is capable of causing death on a large scale. Forget butter knives or guns. He could have driven an SUV through a crowd, and racked up as big of a death toll. As a man of more than moderate intellect, the ways he could have dealt death are numerous. Bombs, poison, fire... Squeezing jello, that's all you're proposing. Short of a return to the cave, the capacity to deal out death is unavoidable. So, why not attack the real problem, that he was apparently an undiagnosed nutcase? That does appear to have been the root cause here, not the means he used, available to millions who conspicuously do not use it for mass murder. As long as he was free on the street, he could have killed, even if you denied every non-murderous person in the world a gun. Institutionalized or effectively treated, he's harmless. So why aren't we discussing mental health, instead of gun control? Because you want an excuse to deny guns to people who aren't going to go on rampages, I would have to assume...
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After watching things like Waco play out, Holocaust analogies seem kind of natural, but I suppose nobody likes being on the recieving end of a Holocaust analogy. Being cast as Bull Connor doesn't sit well, either, I expect. Though it's natural when you're opposing enforcement of a civil liberty. It is a cycle of paranoia, on both sides, and I'd say the way out is to just Drop The Topic. STFU about it for a decade or two. Crime rates are dropping, mass murders are rare, would probably be rarer still if they weren't a sure route to fame. Just drop it, and let the next generation revisit the topic after tempers have settled, and memories of past attacks on this liberty have faded. My side will stop being suspicious of your side, if your side stops trying to use everything that comes along as an excuse to pass new legislation. Aren't there any other urgent causes that need addressing, that you have to spend your time hitting this hot button?
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"I still remember the realization that you could actually see individual leaves on a tree." Man, did that comment ever nail it. It was, I think, in 3rd grade, that I got a teacher who seated us in reverse alphabetical order, ended up at the back of the room instead of the front, and got sent to the principle's office to have my eyes checked. A week later I had glasses, and for the very first time realized it was possible to see individual leaves. Saw a star for the first time in my life! Didn't drive me mad, but it was an amazing experience. I could never get Lasic done, my corneas were too thin to qualify for enough correction. But chemotherapy in 2010 gave me cataracts, which led to a different sort of surgical correction, and I now see clearly without glasses. (Except for reading...) I tell people that, if I'd known what it was like, I'd have gotten cataracts years ago.
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If this was a victory for conservatives, a few more victories and the Constitution will be a dead letter. Roberts had, apparently, 4 votes to strike this constitutional obcenity down entirely, on a basis which would be a genuine victory. The only reason it wasn't struck down was that Roberts didn't want it struck down. When it comes to general limits on federal power, the liberal wing of the Court now has 5 members. That's my take on this and the Arizona ruling. You guys ought to send him a welcome card.
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Which is more than you can say of enumerated powers doctrine. RIP, until we can amend it back into the Constitution. Maybe repass the 10th amendment, adding "Simon says..."?
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Strictly speaking, *you* invoked Godwin's law, I merely demonstrated it... Seriously, we're discussing socialism, of which only two basic flavors have been historically signficant. How are we supposed to do this without mention of the version which killed fewer people? Are we to never mention totalitarian history in the context of political discussions about what it's legitimate to force people to do? How very convenient for people who want to employ force... They can advocate starting down a path, and bar discussion of where it leads. The worst case scenario is always off the table. Godwin's law was an amusing observation, but some people like to use it as a weapon to stifle discussion. Yes, this is socialism. It's socialism without the transparency of the government taking open title to the means of production. If socialism isn't so awful, why object to identifying it?
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"This is national socialism. Noun 1. national socialism - a form of socialism featuring racism and expansionism and obedience to a strong leader that's the only definition i could find which does not mention Hitler. so, um, no: you can't just make up words. " Guess you got me: Obama doesn't seem to be very expansionist... "An inherent aspect of fascist economies was economic dirigisme,[4] meaning an economy where the government exerts strong directive influence, and effectively controls production and allocation of resources. In general, apart from the nationalizations of some industries, fascist economies were based on private property and private initiative, but these were contingent upon service to the state." Seems like a fair description of the Democratic approach to the private sector. Tyro's understanding of insurance companies: "They are private entities tasked with delivering a crucial public need (as we do with housing)." As for your Buckley quote, ew. Guess you got me there.
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You've apparently fixated so on the mild snark, that you can't see the point: If women's shelters save the lives of men, would creating men's shelters save the lives of women? If it helps, we can call them "cooling down centers", instead of "shelters", to preserve the illusion that the guys are always in the wrong. But, seriously, if we gave men in abusive relationships somewhere to go, would it help the situation any?
Toggle Commented Apr 10, 2012 on Murder mystery at Obsidian Wings
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Apr 10, 2012