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Blog: nataliepo
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Today is my last day at Six Apart. It's been 3.5 years with an outstandingly clever and humane group of unforgettable friends. I dedicate this Apperceptive/Six Apart-NYC montage to all of you. [WARNING] This is a long, photo-intensive, inside-joke-ridden post.... Continue »
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Blog: nataliepo
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There I was, working from home on a day where our office had no water nor internet, planning new features for a fine blogging platform, when, all of a sudden, my droopy dream pop beats were interrupted by my landlord... Continue »
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Could be better, right? And as Dave Aiello notes, the verified account status is completely absurd. Continue »
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Blog: micropo
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via cuteoverload.com via weirdseamonsters.com Continue »
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Earlier this month I surveyed some coworkers, bloggers, and friends to amass a recommended reading list for 2010. I made a point not to limit the suggestions to a specific topic, but instead encouraged recommendations across any tech related discipline. After I started receiving responses I decided that sharing this list would be of benefit to everyone involved. So, here is the list of books I was recommended (broken down by arbitrary categories) for 2010: Design / User Interaction: The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition by Steve Krug Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems by Steve Krug The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the Web by Jesse James Garrett Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative by Edward R. Tufte Envisioning Information by Edward R. Tufte The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edition by Edward R. Tufte Beautiful Evidence by Edward R. Tufte Front End Engineering: JavaScript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford JavaScript: The Definitive Guide by David Flanagan jQuery in Action by Yehuda Katz, Bear Bibeault DOM Scripting: Web Design with JavaScript and the Document Object Model by Jeremy Keith CSS Mastery: Advanced Web Standards Solutions, Second Edition by Simon Collison Software Engineering: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites by Peter Morville, Louis Rosenfeld Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented​ Software by Erich Gamma, et al. Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code by Martin Fowler, Kent Beck Linux Kernel Development (2nd Edition) by Robert Love Perl Best Practices by Damian Conway Perl Testing: A Developer's Notebook (Developers Notebook) by Ian Langworth Mastering Algorithms with Perl by Jon Orwant Ruby Pocket Reference by Michael Fitzgerald C Programming Language by Brian W. Kernighan The Art of Unix Programming by Eric S. Raymond Programming Pearls by Jon Bentley Human/Project Management: Managing Humans: Biting and Humorous Tales of a Software Engineering Manager by Michael Lopp Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days (Recipes: a Problem-Solutio​n Ap) by Jessica Livingston The Art of Project Management (Theory in Practice (O'Reilly)) by Scott Berkun The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition (2nd Edition) by Frederick P. Brooks, Frederick P. Brooks Jr. Special thanks to everyone I pinged for the recommendations! Got a recommendation? I'd love to add additional books to this list if you've got one. Let me know! 4/14 Edit: Added two more software engineering books. Thanks guys! Continue »
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"JavaScript: The Good Parts" is a very short, dense book. The book itself weighs in at under 200 pages, but that's not for a lack of content covered. There is very little fluff in this book, which is a welcome relief from some of the more wordy programming books that spend more time explaining their example than the concept the example is trying to demonstrate. The book starts off with some in depth railroad diagrams describing the grammar of JavaScript, to get the reader up to speed, and then immediately jumps into a well thought out discussion on some of JavaScript's finer points. Topics covered include: Objects Functions (w/ coverage of closures, cascading, and currying) Inheritance Arrays (w/ coverage of their implementation and their built in methods) Regular Expressions An appendix detailing the 'Awful Parts' (and the 'Bad Parts') His JSLint program (think lint for JavaScript) An overview of the JSON format This is the kind of book I expect to read two or three times to thoroughly understand everything he's covered. However, it's certainly opened my eyes to a much more elegant way of writing JavaScript. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who dabbles in JavaScript or wishes to learn more about the language. Continue »
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via eddy.stamen.com Cool new twitter visualization product from Stamen. It is powering the MTV movie awards and a neat NBA playoff thing for Nike. Continue »
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Blog: nataliepo
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Who doesn't love the impressive social conclusions made every day by the ingenius data minings of Hunch? Every quantitative-data-loving individual should, and I'm pointing my finger at you, weirdo blog reader checking this post out for the graphs. (We have... Continue »
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We wanted to thank the Services team over at Six Apart for their efforts in creating MMA Socialites. We greatly appreciate everything you've done (and have redone due to us being fickle and well, changing our minds a few times). We look forward to using your award winning services... and better yet, people. Special thanks to: AA, Mena, DJ, Ben H, Liz & Sippey. <3 you guys. Continue »
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