This is Blackfive's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Blackfive's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Blackfive
USA
Recent Activity
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews and author interviews by clicking on the Books category link on the right side bar. The Breaking Point by Dr. Bill Bass and Jon Jefferson, known professionally as Jefferson Bass, realistically uses forensics to solve crimes. Jefferson is a writer and documentary filmmaker while Dr. Bass is a forensic anthropologist and founder of the renowned research facility, the Body Farm. With all of their fictional books they intertwine a powerful crime mystery with details about forensic science. The plot opens with the FBI working at the Body Farm, taking a course on evidence response. They learn how to handle the location and identification of skeletal remains. Shortly thereafter, there is a devastating plane crash resulting in fragmenting body parts, making it difficult to identify the victims. Working closely with the FBI the main character, Dr. Bill Brockton, is asked to help find the remains of a maverick millionaire who was supposedly killed in the fiery plane crash. Brockton has made a reputation for himself as a prominent forensic anthropologist while doing research and teaching at the University of Tennessee, home to the Body Farm. Brockton must determine if the philanthropist is a diabolical killer and has faked his own death or has really died in the crash. What makes this story very powerful and a tearjerker is that Brockton suffers one crisis after another. The parallels with the prophet Job are evident, considering Brockton is a good person who is beset with horrendous disasters that take away all he holds dear. He is seen as drowning, with his life spinning out of control. First his identification of the crash victim(s) is called into question. Then he receives a threatening message from the serial killer who attempted to kill his family. Because this a prequel the next line might be a spoiler alert for those who did not read previous books: his beloved wife Kathleen, a soul mate and the source of his security, tells him she is dying of cancer. The comparison to Job was done, according to Jefferson, because “I wanted to explore suffering. Dr. Brockton is a decent man who is caught up in personal and professional problems. We want to bring in something new in every book and not do retreads. Like Job, he is a man pushed to his limits, but unlike Job not everything turns out fine for him regarding his personal life. I think that is more realistic.” One of the most interesting parts of the book is the discussion of veteran issues. A shout out is given to the Vietnam veterans, in the quote, “Our conflicted feelings-our national shame-had created an unwritten but undeniable tragic domestic policy: a policy of pretending that Vietnam had never happened, and of turning a blind, indifferent eye to Vietnam vets and their postwar troubles.” Yet, there is also a scene in the book where the research of the Body Farm, studying time of death, is called into question, since some of the subjects were corpses of veterans. Dr. Bass explained to blackfive.net, “The scene in the book about the complaint regarding the veteran’s bodies is true, although we took artistic license. A major challenge to the Body Farm occurred when the Tennessee Department of Veteran Affairs discovered some of the research subjects were veterans. These were unclaimed bodies and the city/county did not want to incur the expense of a burial so they gave me the bodies. I did not know that some of the corpses were veterans. After I found out I sent the six bodies back. I am very sympathetic because I am a Korean War vet. They wanted to shut down the Body Farm but I prevailed since it is obvious that the research is valuable and helps to solve cases.” Jon Jefferson regards “our country’s treatment of Vietnam vets as shameful. Returning Vietnam vets have paid the price for this national ambivalence, which I think is dreadful. I was lucky since I had a high lottery number drawn so I was not called. I put in the book a quote about how Dr. Brockton was able to stay out of the war.” Although the story of The Breaking Point is fictional the science is all too real. What makes the plot fascinating is that readers will have a hard time separating fact from fiction. This novel has all the elements of a page-turner: mystery, danger, and suspense. Yet, it also tugs at people’s emotions as grief and loss are explored, something that can resonate with everyone. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews by clicking on the Books category link on the right side bar. The Insider Threat by Brad Taylor is a realistic thriller. As a retired Lt. Colonel and a veteran of the US Special Forces he writes from his experiences and insights, creating a great premise. Although this story is fiction it is also a chilling reminder regarding the serious threat of ISIS. The plot has Pike Logan, the head of Taskforce, a covert terrorist unit, working with his team to thwart terrorist attacks. From Kenya to Jordan to Europe and possibly here in America they must find and stop ISIS recruits who are Americans with passports that allow them to move freely throughout the world. Taylor told blackfive.net, “Libya is terrorist central, and I wanted to show the linkage with terrorism. That is why in the beginning of the book I put the quotes from them and allow readers to see how their words are dangerous. These people going to the Islamic State have a love for killing. By and large their policy is to be archaic and do disgusting acts. There is no negotiating with ISIS, since it only values killing people who they see as Infidels. They speak in ‘556,’ that is their language. Since ‘556’ is a military round of an army rifle, it becomes obvious there is no reasoning with them.” All of the protagonists are strong, independent, and complicated individuals whose sole passion is protecting what is right and good in this world. Israeli agents Aaron and Shoshana are fascinating characters that are brought back from the previous story. The interactions of all these characters make for good and humorous banter. Readers will root for these characters with Shoshana seen as a female Pike. Taylor noted, “I wanted to find a way to bring the Israeli agents back for this book. I found out how to do it when I discovered through research that the beheaded journalist, Steven Sotloff, actually had dual Israeli-American citizenship. The interaction between these characters makes for an interesting story. Shoshana is a victim of her own violent circumstances, which makes her different than Jennifer who still sees the world through rose colored glasses. Pike likes Shoshana because she is similar to him: not politically correct and will bend the rules as far as she can go, unless given a direct order.” On the other hand, the antagonists are pure evil. They are based on the 1987 movie The Lost Boys, where a gang of vampires recruits teenage boys. Taylor labels his terrorist group, The Lost Boys, who are young American men that have gone to the dark side by working with ISIS. They are blond haired, blue-eyed with no social media presence, who can slip easily into the US, falling under the radar. Another interesting fact is that a main terrorist is named Ringo, while others are called the Beatles, named after the legendary rock group because of their English accents. A theme evident in all of Taylor’s books is the how commanders must play Monday morning quarterback. Based on his own experiences, Taylor “wants to show if you make a decision in combat it may not necessarily be the correct one. Sometimes you make a decision and bad things happen, which you must live with and try to learn from.” The Insider Threat has nonstop action, and a very realistic plot. As with Tom Clancy novels he is able to write about serious dangers in a very suspenseful and intense way. Through well-defined characters and dialogue this novel is a page-turner that is a must read. Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews and author interviews by clicking on the Books category on the right side bar. Secrets of State by Matthew Palmer is a spy thriller that has diplomats instead of operatives. With Matthew venturing into the thriller writer world, it became an all in the family affair since his late father, Michael Palmer, and his brother Daniel also are authors. While Michael Palmer concentrated on hospitals and doctors to set the story, Matthew uses the world as a backdrop. He commented to blackfive.net, about his dad who was a best-selling author, “I learned how to write a novel from my dad as we sat around the dinner table. He would explain how to tell a story, construct a character, shape a story arc, and keep readers engaged. My brother and I learned from pop to create tension by taking an ordinary person and putting them in extraordinary circumstances. But it is hard to do that with the same guy twice, which is why my brother and I write stand-alones instead of a series.” He went on to say, “My dad was tremendously helpful and supportive. He got a huge kick from his kids writing. One of the great tragedies is that he passed away before the publication date of my first book. One of the most rewarding days of my life was the debut of my first book, American Mission. I walked into a Barnes & Noble and saw on the 'new-release' shelf, my father's final book, my book, and my brother's book, all lined up alphabetically alongside each other. This was a great moment.” As a State Department employee for the last 24 years that included working in its think tank and at the National Security Council he is able to use his experiences to write interesting plots. In this stand-alone Sam Trainor, the former top South Asia expert in the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, has found a job in the private sector. He now works as an analyst for the consulting firm of Argus Systems where he stumbles upon an intelligence anomaly. He realizes that this transcript of a phone conversation about upending the political balance between India and Pakistan is misinformation that could cause an all out war between these nuclear countries. Sam must race against a ticking clock and find the terrorists who have stolen a Pakistani nuclear warhead to detonate in Mumbai, India. Although fiction, readers learn about the complex Indian caste system between the elite and the slums. They are also exposed to a modern day Machiavellian scenario: does the end justify the means. The book has a quote from Stalin, “the death of one person is a tragedy; the death of a hundred thousand is a statistic.” The protagonist, Sam must answer the question throughout the book, should one person be sacrificed to save many? The book also explores the affect of outsourcing America’s national security to private corporations. The villains see themselves as Patriots willing to do anything to keep America safe. Viewing the US President as misguided and not willing to make the hard choices they plan on stripping Pakistan of its nuclear weapons by setting one off in India and creating a new war. Palmer brings to the forefront the issue of how secure are nuclear weapons in the hands of rogue nations. What Palmer wants the reader to get out his books, “I hope people see this threat and to think of the morality and ethical issues including how far should we go to prevent terrorists from gaining access to Pakistan’s nuclear program. I also want to change how diplomats are viewed. Diplomats are frustrated for getting the short end of the stick in popular culture. We are never heroes and are cast as unsympathetic bureaucrats. I hope Americans see that diplomats have gotten a bum rap over the years. It is a dangerous job for the most junior officer to the most senior. If you walk into the State Department you will see on both sides of the wall engraved names of US diplomats who lost their lives in the line of duty. It is a long list.” He also gave a heads up about his next book, The Wolf of Sarajevo. Set in the Balkans, where Palmer spent many years as a diplomat, the hero must try to figure out who is pushing for a new conflict in the area and why. His books do not have shootouts and the protagonist is not a super hero. The plot is moved along more by the characters words than their actions. The intrigue of Secrets of State is the details of how diplomats must maneuver through international and domestic politics, sometimes risking their own life in doing so. Continue reading
Posted Jun 25, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
U.S. Marines perform maintenance on an AH-1Z Viper helicopter aboard the USS Anchorage in the Philippine Sea, June 2, 2015. The Marines are assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jamean Berry Continue reading
Posted Jun 25, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews and author interviews by clicking on the Books category link on the right side bar. Tiny Little Thing by Beatriz Williams is a superb read. It combines politics, mystery and romance within a historical background. It is a character driven storyline driven by the issues of the mid-1960s, including political intrigue, the controversy of the Vietnam veterans, and the treatment of women. The story alternates between the years 1964 and 1966. The reader becomes engrossed in the family dynamics. The narration switches between the main female character, Christina (Tiny) Hardcastle’s 1966 perspective and Major Caspian (Cap) Harrison’s 1964 outlook. The plot begins with Tiny’s husband, Frank, attending the Medal of Honor Ceremony for his cousin Caspian. Frank sees this as a valued photo-op, which will help his run for Congress in Massachusetts. Intertwined in the political plotline is a mystery involving a photograph sent to Tiny and a car found in the Cape Cod shed of her husband’s family. Throughout the rest of the book readers become part of the character’s lives, being transported into the 1960’s era, as they try to solve the secrets along with the characters. Beatriz stated to blackfive.net, “I wanted to write a compelling story of a political dynasty with the patriarch pushing behind the scenes for this to happen. I always loved history from childhood. In college I majored in Anthropology that included the study of history and human nature. I was able to incorporate my studies into my writings, where history becomes the scenery, weaved into the plot. I think of myself as a historical novelist. The 1960s presented the friction between the traditional and the modern, which included intense social, political, economic, and artistic change.” One of the most fascinating characters is Major Caspian, who is modeled after John Wayne: strong, silent, a hero, masculine, and honest. He becomes Tiny’s savior who is trying to escape living the perfect façade. Initially she has no say in her marriage, expected to be the perfect political wife. Together with her husband they are seen as the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and attractive. They must both live-up to their parent’s expectations. But with the help of her sister Pepper Schuyler, she gains strength and fights for her independence. A supporting character, Tom, plays the antagonist to Caspian’s protagonist. Explored in depth is the issue about how US soldiers were treated when they returned home from Vietnam. Tom is constantly putting Cap down for enlisting and fighting in Vietnam. Throughout the book he makes disgusting references to the Major, “I can’t sit here and eat dinner with these people. You fat, satisfied pigs who give medals to fucking murderers.” Yet, it is the major that grabs reader’s sympathies. She noted to blackfive.net, “I did a crash course in the Vietnam War. I want the readers who were against the war to recognize they were blaming the wrong people. I deliberately portrayed one character, Tom, as obnoxious toward the Major. He is someone who enjoys privilege without recognizing the sacrifice of those serving. He would certainly never make that sacrifice himself. My grandfather was a torpedo bomber in the Pacific during World War II. I understand the sacrifices made by soldiers. That is why I had Caspian lose a leg in the war. I wanted to emphasize people change in a fundamental way either physically or mentally.” There is also a shout out to wounded warriors in the dedication and through Caspian, a paraplegic who lost a leg during the war. William’s writes, “To all those who return from war not quite whole and to the people who love them.” The story allows the reader to understand the sacrifices those serving have made for their country. Tiny Little Thing is a fascinating look at wealth, love, power, ambition, and to what length family members will go to protect each other. The historical events in the book are intertwined perfectly within the lives of the characters that make for a realistic and gripping story. Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Navy Capt. William Koyama, commander of Carrier Air Wing 5, prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington in an F/A-18E Super Hornet after completing his 4000th flight hour near Guam, June 8, 2015. The Super Hornet is assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Bryan Mai Continue reading
Posted Jun 24, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Two B-52H Stratofortress pilots maneuver behind the lead aircraft to complete a simulated air strike during exercise Saber Strike 15 in Europe, June 8, 2015. Bomber operations can respond to a variety of potential threats and situations. The exercise promotes regional stability and security while strengthening partner capabilities and trust. U.S. Air Force photos by Senior Airman Malia Jenkins Continue reading
Posted Jun 23, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
"The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews by clicking on the Books category on the right side bar. Under Fire a Tom Clancy novel by Grant Blackwood has the return of Jack Ryan Jr. as the protagonist. Since Tom Clancy’s death his legacy is carried on with authors Mark Greaney and Grant Blackwood. Both continue the intense, thrilling, and realistic plots that Tom Clancy was known for. Whereas Clancy included a lot of technology in his stories, in this book Blackwood emphasizes the intelligence world. Blackwood noted to blackfive.net, “I was proud to work with Tom on Dead Or Alive. This very successful book kept the franchise moving forward. I am keenly aware of the tradition I have been tasked with. Besides being a fan and reader, while writing Dead Or Alive I got steeped in the Clancy universe as a writer. Jack Ryan Junior’s drives and motivations was something I understood from working with Clancy earlier. Greaney, our editor, and I talked a lot about what happened in the book written by Mark, and what I have Jack doing in this book. We did not only dovetail but wanted to make sure there were no contradictions, that it was a seamless change. In the early stages of planning this book I told Mark, ‘here is what I have in mind,’ to make sure it did not mess him up with his next Clancy book. He read Under Fire as I was going along so he has a good segue going into the next book. I know the plan is for two books a year going forward and we have not come to a decision if I will write another one.” The book centers on Jack Ryan Jr. who is coming into his own as an operative. While on an intelligence mission in Tehran Jack meets with his old high school friend, Seth Gregory. Later Seth disappears and Jack is told he is a possible traitor. It becomes imperative that he must choose between his loyalties to his friend, Seth, or to his county. Pursuing the truth leads Jack across Iran, through war-torn Caucasus, and deep into territory controlled by the aggressive Russian Federation. He is helped by an enigmatic Iranian woman, Ysabel, who becomes a loyal partner. They race against the clock to determine who is friend and who is foe. The book gives a shout out to the unsung heroes, US intelligence agents. He commented, “I like to pay homage to those on the cutting edge of this world. There is this old saying in the intelligence business; things will go wrong. It is how someone handles themselves when they go off track that is a good judge of character. Jack Jr. realized he could not dwell on the guilt. He is really good at adjusting his course and moving forward, the hallmark of an intelligence operative. The world of espionage is the “wilderness of mirrors,” in that nothing is as it seems to be. The motives, intentions, and methods are a minefield Jack must navigate. This is often the case with real-world, high-stakes field operatives.” The plotline has Jack Ryan Jr. delving deep into the geo-political world, bringing back memories of the Cold War. Russia’s turbulent relationship with that region, the home of many separatist groups is brought to the forefront. This scenario has a Putin-like president of Russia forcefully trying to exert his influence over the nation of Dagestan, while Jack and others are attempting to assist in a successful coup. A very compelling supporting cast of characters is introduced. Ysabel Kashani has an American mother and an Iranian father. She will become Jack’s new love interest and is described as beautiful, brave, smart, independent, witty, and resourceful. Jack wonders what motivates her to become an agent. Which piece of “MICE” is the reason for her cooperation: “money, ideology, compromise, or coercion?” He realizes she is unlike any woman he has met before and that her reasons are based on being a principled and loyal person. Throughout the book she steps up to the plate to help and rescue Jack, basically having his back. The other character, Seth Gregory, is seen as cold-blooded, driven, and at times reckless, a man on a mission. He is a very complicated character whose motivations are based upon a deep familial secret. Emotional issues that are connected drive him to what he is attempting to accomplish. This leaves Jack to wonder if Seth is the same person he knew in high school or has he changed over time. The author also wanted to give a heads up about the re-release electronically of his original series. It is a collection of three books whose main character is Briggs Tanner, an operative much like Jack Ryan Jr. These books have a lot of political intrigue and action. Under Fire has a very intriguing storyline. As with any Tom Clancy novel it brings into focus current event issues. Not only is it riveting and gripping but also has a very realistic plot. Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following Book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews by clicking on the Books category on the right side bar. The President’s Shadow by Brad Meltzer is the final book in the Beecher series. As with all his books he intertwines history with an action packed plot. In addition, Meltzer puts in some tidbits of information that have become a part of everyone’s daily life. For example, ever wonder why a wedding ring is worn on the ring finger of the left hand, or how a pressed penny becomes a symbol for those in the military. He explained to blackfive.net, “I have a curious mind. I am obsessed with finding these ideas and have a collection of odd facts. Regarding the pressed penny I got that idea from a friend in the Army. He wears it around his neck with his dog tags and told me that it is a military tradition to imprint either the Lord’s Prayer or their unit’s logo. It is used for good luck and a form of ID. I love working this stuff into the storyline.” There is not just one theme to this book. It powerfully delves into the treatment of those enlisted in the military, the relationship between a father and child, and how ordinary people can make a difference. This complex novel explores the power of government and the military over an individual’s life, the intrigue of having a supposed history nerd, Beecher, able to save the Presidency, and the emotional pull of family relationships. The book opens with the intense scene of First Lady Shona Wallace finding a severed arm in the White House Garden. This grim discovery leads the President to ask for Beecher White’s assistance to unravel the clues. Readers might wonder why the President would need the help of this nerdy archivist when he has the Secret Service at his disposal. But people should consider the recent mishaps and exploits of that protective service, and the fact that secrecy prevails over Washington DC. Also, Beecher has another role, the main member of the Culper Ring, a 200-year-old secret society founded by George Washington and charged with protecting the Presidency. Through his investigation Beecher will find secrets, including the importance of the number four, as well as what happened to his father. Meltzer noted, “This all got started because I got a call from homeland security asking me to brainstorm on how terrorists could attack this country. I did some research and traced the Culper Ring back to George Washington. He had his own secret spy ring made up of ordinary people because no one looks twice at an ordinary person. I love that. Washington is 100% a hero. He was one of my favorite Presidents. Even the children’s book I have written includes George Washington because he is one of the most extraordinary men in history. Think about it, he could have been the King of America; yet, walked away from all that power.” The President’s Shadow mixes history, politics, and drama, creating a fast-paced storyline. This page-turner includes treachery, political conspiracy, questionable ethics, and secret societies. Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, foreground, sails in the Chesapeake Bay near Norfolk, Va., June 8, 2015. The Eagle's crew recently participated in the 39th annual Norfolk Harborfest. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Trey Clifton Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
A U.S. airman guides a B-2 Spirit, known as the stealth bomber, for refueling during Saber Strike 15 on Royal Air Force Fairford, England, June 7, 2015. The exercise demonstrates the aircraft's capabilities to forward-deploy and deliver conventional and nuclear deterrence. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malia Jenkins Continue reading
Posted Jun 21, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
As seen through a night-vision device, a Marine prepares to land on a drop zone in Louisburg, N.C., June 5, 2015, after conducting a jump from a CH-53 Super Stallion helicopter during training. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Andre Dakis Continue reading
Posted Jun 20, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
U.S. soldiers rappel from a UH-60 Black Hawk during an air assault course at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command's Grafenwoehr Training Area in Bavaria, Germany, June 9, 2015. U.S. Army photo by Markus Rauchenberger U.S. Army Sgt. Samantha Melanson rappels from a 55-foot tower during an air assault course at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command's Grafenwoehr Training Area in Bavaria, Germany, June 8, 2015. Melanson is assigned to the 15th Engineer Battalion. U.S. Army photo by Markus Rauchenberger Continue reading
Posted Jun 19, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The Thunderbirds Diamond Formation perform the Pass in Review maneuver during the Wings Over Whiteman practice airshow at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 12, 2015. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rachel Maxwell Continue reading
Posted Jun 19, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Sailors recover the test vehicle for NASA's low-density supersonic decelerator off the coast of the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii, June 8, 2015. The vehicle is part of a project to investigate and test technologies to land future robotics and humans on Mars, and safely return large payloads to Earth. The sailors are assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 1. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer John M. Hageman Continue reading
Posted Jun 18, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
A U.S sailor helps a distressed mariner get to the medical staff aboard the USS Rushmore in the Makassar Strait, June 10, 2015. The Rushmore offered assistance to distressed mariners in the waters between the Indonesian islands of Kalimantan and Sulawesi. Once on board, the mariners received food and medical attention by Marines and sailors assigned to the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit and Essex Amphibious Ready Group. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos Continue reading
Posted Jun 18, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jason Kelleher lays brick for a new two-classroom school building during the New Horizons Honduras 2015 exercise at the Gabriela Mistral primary school site in Ocotes Alto, Honduras, June 9, 2015. Kelleher is a combat engineer assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 271. U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. David J. Murphy Continue reading
Posted Jun 17, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews and interviews by clicking on the Books category on the right side bar. Making the Case by Kimberly Guilfoyle is a “how to” book, centered on being an advocate for yourself. She navigates between her role as a mother and as a co-host of the popular Fox show, The Five. She provides a glimpse of her personal life and how those she most admired influenced her. The suggestions in the book are useful for those retiring from the military. The author shows how people can organize their thoughts and plans, engage in meaningful discussions with those around them, and achieve certain goals in all aspects of life. Readers will also learn tips and strategies that make the best advocates so successful. Those defending America will recognize the points she emphasizes in the first chapter in order to succeed: be clear about your objective, prepare a brief story about your subject that reflects character, ensure all the facts are at your fingertips, consider the perspective of the other side, know the moderator, consult experts, and never ask a question for which you don't know the answer. She directly noted to blackfive.net, “The key lesson for me: Don’t make this life about you, it’s about other people. I’ve tried to live my life in a way that respects the beliefs of my mother and father. They sacrificed a tremendous amount for me to be able to do what I do today.” Those entering the job market must understand that these are challenging times. The work force is not as stable as it used to be because employees are looking for growth and fulfillment. Guilfoyle feels “Graduating from college is a pivotal point in a young person’s life. Many college graduates receive advice from their other friends who are also encountering this change. But maybe they should consult and talk with people who had had life experiences.” She went on to say to blackfive.net, “Today’s times are a lot more impersonal, due to an outgrowth of technology. Everything is automated. When you apply it feels like going to an ATM machine. When trying to apply for a job, attempt to meet with the person or at least talk with them on the phone so they feel your presence, even though it may be difficult. This interpersonal connection should not be a forgotten connection. Remember it is difficult to establish any connection with email. College grads and those retiring from the military need to be encouraged by letting them know G-d helps those who help themselves. They have blessings, gifts, passion, and drive.” When successfully getting an interview she emphasizes develop a "One minute spoken memoir. This is the story you'll share about yourself during your interview. It should sum up who you are. In other words, you need to be prepared to succinctly explain to a prospective employer what you're trying to accomplish or why you are applying to their firm.” Making the Case encourages people not to be afraid to make career decisions. Guilfoyle uses her story in the hopes that she can inspire others to have courage, to be an advocate by making their own case, and to learn how to state their case effectively. Continue reading
Posted Jun 17, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
An AH-1W Super Cobra attempts a touch-and-go landing on the flight deck of the dock landing ship USS Ashland in the Pacific Ocean, June 5, 2015. The Super Cobra is assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class David A. Cox Continue reading
Posted Jun 17, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Marine recruits spread out during a martial arts training session on Parris Island, S.C., June 11, 2015. The recruits are assigned to Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
An MH-60S Seahawk helicopter lifts pallets of supplies from the flight deck of the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Walter S. Diehl during a vertical replenishment with the amphibious assault ship USS Essex in the South China Sea, June 14, 2015. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
The following book review is a special for BlackFive readers provided by Elise Cooper. You can read all of our book reviews by clicking on the Books category link on the right side bar. The Fixer by Joseph Finder is a suspenseful novel. What makes this story special is its unique and engaging emotional human dynamics. Besides corruption and blackmail, the author delves deeply into the complex relationship between father and son. The reader wonders how much of a person’s past is known even in a close relationship. Finder explained to blackfive.net that he conceived of the story idea while “making renovations in the house we have. I was talking to the workers and they told me about finding all kinds of interesting stuff like money. I thought what would it be like for a guy totally broke to come upon a chunk of cash in a house. The book starts off with a classic ‘what if.’ I chose the title because the house is a fixer upper. Rick is determined to fix his own life. The father and those he worked with are “fixers” who have helped pay off contractors.” Right from the opening pages this book is a real page-turner. After investigative reporter Rick Hoffman loses his job, fiancée, and apartment his only option is to move back into his childhood home. Neglected for years when his father had to move into a nursing home after suffering a stroke, Rick starts to make renovations and finds $3.4 million hidden in the walls. Trying to find out where the money originated and how it was placed there, Rick finds out that his father had deep dark secrets and a life he knew nothing about. The author noted, “My relationship with my dad was nothing like Rick’s. Rick called his dad by his first name, Lenny. I called my parents’ dad and mom. Isn’t it interesting that there is this whole different world that you are not privy too, a past of your parents that could have secrets. My own dad died while I was writing this book so it became a book about fathers and sons. You never really know your parents, only a slice. I made Rick’s dad have a stroke because of my dad. That is why I had Rick unable to talk with his father since Lenny could not communicate.” As the story progresses, more of the father’s past is revealed; although it does not make him any more of a sympathetic figure. This is also the case with the portrayal of Rick as a superficial and self-centered person, which contributes to the reader’s initial dislike. Yet, as the story advances, the reader is drawn to Rick when he finds his moral character. Even with some bad choices and questionable actions, readers will develop a fondness for Rick as he exposes corruption within Boston’s Big Dig Highway Tunnel project of cash payoffs, political deal making, and cover-ups that followed the twenty year multibillion dollar project. Readers got a heads up that Rick could possibly come back in another story. Finder feels that “as an investigative journalist he could uncover some mystery or conspiracy. He has a lot of potential. Maybe Andrea, the female lead, will also come back since she can use her financial background skills to help solve other conspiracies. I could make this exception, something I have not done with the other characters in my stand-alone books.” The Fixer blends suspense with a captivating and thrilling plot. As Father’s Day approaches this is a good book that emphasizes the father-son relationship. It is a fast paced book that readers will not want to put down. Continue reading
Posted Jun 16, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Marines battle a fire during emergency preparedness training on Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C., May 28, 2015. The Marines are assigned to the station’s Headquarters Squadron. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Samantha Torres Continue reading
Posted Jun 13, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
An F/A-18E Super Hornet launches from the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson during an air-power demonstration in the Pacific Ocean, May 31, 2015. The Vinson and Carrier Air Wing 17 are in the 3rd Fleet area of operations returning to homeport after a Middle East and Western Pacific deployment. The Super Hornet is assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 81. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class John Philip Wagner, Jr. Continue reading
Posted Jun 11, 2015 at BLACKFIVE
Image
Marines work on an AH-1 Cobra helicopter on the flight deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean, June 2, 2015. The Marines are assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161. U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Liam Kennedy Continue reading
Posted Jun 11, 2015 at BLACKFIVE