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J. Bradford DeLong
Berkeley, CA
J. Bradford DeLong is an economist teaching at the University of California at Berkeley.
Interests: history, economic history, information age, political economy, grand strategy, international relations, material culture., information technology, economics
Recent Activity
**Matt Bruenig**: [What Is Wealth?](http://www.demos.org/blog/4/22/14/pikettys-capital-what-wealth): "In 'Capital,' Piketty tracks as far back as he can the history of wealth inequality... >...which is also described as the history of inequality in the ownership of capital. In order to embark upon such a project, one must provide a definition of wealth and capital, which turns out to be a contentious undertaking. >For Piketty, wealth and capital are ultimately socially constructed categories. When he refers to wealth, he is not talking about land or machines or buildings necessarily. He is talking about anything that can be traded as an asset that generates a financial return in a society at a given moment in time. In periods when people could be bought and sold like capital, those people counted as wealth. Right now, monopoly rights over ideas (patents) and media (copyright) count as wealth as well. >So he is not tracking the history of wealth and capital in a physical sense. He is tracking the history of the distribution of asset values. The decision to track wealth this way is clearly the correct one for his project, but it already appears to be driving some confusion in the crush of reviews and reactions. >**Wealth... Continue reading
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[**Over at Equitable Growth:**][1] It is now six years since Olivier Blanchard called for "outlining the contours of a new macroeconomic policy framework". Yet what is that framework? Where is it? Who outlines it? And what processes will give it political traction? Looking back to 2010: **Olivier Blanchard et al.** (2010): [Rethinking Macro Policy](http://www.voxeu.org/article/rethinking-macro-policy): "The global crisis forced economic policymakers... >...to react in ways not anticipated by the pre-crisis consensus.... Here the IMF’s chief economist and colleagues (i) review the main elements of the pre-crisis consensus, (ii) identify the elements which turned out to be wrong, and (iii) take a tentative first pass at outlining the contours of a new macroeconomic policy framework... You can argue that the elements of such a framework are there. But they are disassembled, lying on the ground, disconnected. And as far as political traction, they are next to nowhere. [**Read MOAR at Equitable Growth**][1] [1]: http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25514 I am ending my invited lectures these days with this: It is traditional to close lectures like this with Keynes’s “madmen in authority” quote: >Is the fulfilment of these ideas a visionary hope? Have they insufficient roots in the motives which govern the evolution of political society? Are... Continue reading
**Must-Read:** It is now six years since Olivier Blanchard called for "outlining the contours of a new macroeconomic policy framework". Yet what is that framework? Where is it? Who outlines it? And what processes will give it political traction? **Olivier Blanchard et al.** (2010): [Rethinking Macro Policy](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25512): "The global crisis forced economic policymakers... >...to react in ways not anticipated by the pre-crisis consensus.... Here the IMF’s chief economist and colleagues (i) review the main elements of the pre-crisis consensus, (ii) identify the elements which turned out to be wrong, and (iii) take a tentative first pass at outlining the contours of a new macroeconomic policy framework. > Continue reading
**Must-Read:**I really do not like the "too many workers" framing: I vastly prefer either: * Too little public investment * Too little government purchases * Too little government debt * Too little risk-bearing capacity * Too little in the way of safe assets for savers to hold But the argument seems 100% right to me: **Jim Tankersley**: [The world has too many workers. Here’s one way to fix it](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25510): "overcomplicating America's economic challenges today... >...Maybe the problem is simple: too many workers. That is the argument made in a new paper released by the centrist Democratic think tank Third Way, which theorizes that the world economy is suffering from an oversupply of labor and too little demand for the goods and services those workers produce.... Daniel Alpert... [makes] Third Way’s latest effort to shape the liberal policy conversation in the 2016 presidential primaries. It does so in decidedly un-centrist fashion — by embracing a larger infrastructure spending program than Bernie Sanders does.... >Alpert laments the ‘suddenness and extent of the integration of over 3 billion people into a global capitalist market, that really only hitherto consisted of about 800 million in the advanced economies.’ He argues that worker influx has... Continue reading
**Must-Read: Ben Thompson** (2013): [Obsoletive: Revolutionary Products in Tech Don't Disrupt--They Obsolete](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25508): "[Christiansenian] disruption is low-end... >...a disruptive product is worse than the incumbent technology on the vectors that the incumbent’s customers care about. But, it’s cheaper, and better on other vectors that different customers care about. And, eventually, as the new technology improves, it takes the incumbent’s market. >This is not what happened in cell phones. In 2006, the Nokia 1600 was the top-selling phone... the BlackBerry Pearl the best-selling smartphone. Both were only a year away from their doom, but that doom was not a cheaper, less-capable product, but in fact the exact opposite: a far more powerful, and fantastically more expensive product called the iPhone.... The problem for Nokia and BlackBerry was that their specialties--calling, messaging, and email--were simply apps: one function on a general-purpose computer. A dedicated device that only did calls, or messages, or email, was simply obsolete. An even cursory examination of tech history makes it clear that ‘obsoletion’--where a cheaper, single-purpose product is replaced by a more expensive, general purpose product--is just as common as ‘disruption’--even more so, in fact.... The Mac (and PC), iPod, and iPhone weren’t so much disruptive as they... Continue reading
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**Over at [Equitable Growth](http://EquitableGrowth.org): Must-Reads:** * [Live at Project Syndicate: Rescue Helicopters for Stranded Economies - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/live-at-project-syndicate-rescue-helicopters-for-stranded-economies/) * **Nick Bunker**: [When it comes to causality, no one technique should have all that power - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/when-it-comes-to-causality-no-one-technique-should-have-all-that-power/) * **Ben Zipperer**: [Equitable Growth in Conversation: An interview with David Card and Alan Krueger - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/equitable-growth-in-conversation-an-interview-with-david-card-and-alan-krueger/) * **Nick Bunker**: [Weekend reading: “Participating in the labor market” edition - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/weekend-reading-participating-in-the-labor-market-edition/) * **Austin Clemens and Nick Bunker**: [An interactive history of U.S. labor force participation - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/interactive-history-us-labor-participation/) * **Ben Thompson**: [Antitrust and Aggregation](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25503) * **Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman** (1974): [Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25501) ---- **Should Reads:** * **Pro Growth Liberal**: [Could A Higher Minimum Wage Increase Employment?](http://econospeak.blogspot.com/2016/04/could-higher-minimum-wage-increase.html) * **Larry Mishel**: [Tired of economists’ misdirection on globalization](http://www.epi.org/blog/tired-of-economists-misdirection-on-globalization/) * **andall K. Q. Akee, William E. Copeland, Gordon Keeler, Adrian Angold, and E. Jane Costello**: [Parents’ Incomes and Children’s Outcomes: A Quasi-Experiment Using Transfer Payments from Casino Profits](http://luskin.ucla.edu/sites/default/files/ParentsIncomes.pdf): * **James Kwak**: [Cultural Capture in Black and White](https://baselinescenario.com/2016/04/22/cultural-capture-in-black-and-white/) * **Austin Clemens**: [Interactive: The changing economics of the American family](http://equitablegrowth.org/changing-economics-of-the-american-family/) * [A Methodological-Moral Struggle Over the Sanders Economic-Policy Proposals](http://www.bradford-delong.com/2016/04/a-methodological-moral-struggle-over-the-sanders-economic-policy-proposals.html) * **Rachel B. Herrmann**: [Histories of Food and Hunger](http://backlist.cc/lists/histories-of-food-and-hunger) * **Paul Krugman**: [Impurity in... Continue reading
**Must-Read: Ben Thompson**: [Antitrust and Aggregation](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25503): "With zero distribution costs and zero transaction costs... >...consumers are attracted to an aggregator through the delivery of a superior experience, which attracts modular suppliers, which improves the experience and thus attracts more consumers, and thus more suppliers in the aforementioned virtuous cycle. It is a phenomenon seen across industries including search (Google and web pages), feeds (Facebook and content), shopping (Amazon and retail goods), video (Netflix/YouTube and content creators), transportation (Uber/Didi and drivers), and lodging (Airbnb and rooms, Booking/Expedia and hotels).... All things being equal the equilibrium state in a market covered by Aggregation Theory is monopoly: one aggregator that has captured all of the consumers and all of the suppliers. >This monopoly, though, is a lot different than the monopolies of yesteryear.... Consumers are self-selecting onto the Aggregator’s platform because it’s a better experience. This has completely neutered U.S. antitrust law, which is based on whether or not there has been clear harm to the consumer... it’s why the FTC has declined to sue Google for questionable search practices.... >Once competitors die the aggregators become monopsonies — i.e. the only buyer for modularized suppliers. And this, by extension, turns the virtuous cycle... Continue reading
**Must-Read: Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman** (1974): [Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25501): "Many decisions are based on beliefs concerning the likelihood of future events... >...These beliefs are usually expressed in statements such as 'I think that...', 'the chances are...', 'it is unlikely that...', and so forth. Occasionally, beliefs concerning uncertain events are expressed in numerical form as odds or subjective probabilities. What determines such beliefs? How do people assess the probability of an uncertain event or he value of an uncertain quantity?... People rely on a limited number of heuristic principles which reduce the complex tasks of assessing probabilities and predicting values to simpler judgmental operations. In general, these heuristics are quite useful, but sometimes they lead to severe and systematic errors... > Continue reading
**[Debunking America’s Populist Narrative](https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/globalization-not-to-blame-for-stagnant-us-incomes-by-j--bradford-delong-2016-03)**: BERKELEY – Listen to the dog-whistles—or, rather, dog-screams—of American politics this just-begun election season and this is what you hear: of Chinese and Mexicans together with Wall Street and lousy trade deals who outsourced factories and robbed you of your rightful good job, of Mexicans who come here willing to work for less and force you to listen to words in a Spanish you cannot understand, and of Muslims of whom you live in fear that their bombs will blow you to bits. These dog-scream undercurrents are scary, and scarier than usual. They are scary for foreigners who, by virtue of living in this world, find themselves not just in the room but in bed with the psychologically-unstable hyperpower elephant that is the United States. They are scary for Americans who thought or hoped or perhaps only wished that they lived in the Republic of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt. **[READ MOAR](https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/globalization-not-to-blame-for-stagnant-us-incomes-by-j--bradford-delong-2016-03)** Now this fear can be irrational and extreme. Donald Trump collects only 40% or so of the vote from the 15% or so of the adult population that votes in Republican Party primaries, and polls tell us he is massively... Continue reading
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**Live at Project Syndicate:** [Rescue Helicopters for Stranded Economies](https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/helicopter-money-fiscal-stimulus-by-j--bradford-delong-2016-04): BERKELEY – For countries where nominal interest rates are at or near zero, fiscal stimulus should be a no-brainer.... Some point to the risk that, once the economy recovers and interest rates rise, governments will fail to make the appropriate adjustments to fiscal policy. But... governments that wish to pursue bad policies will do so no matter what decisions are made today.... Aversion to fiscal expansion reflects raw ideology, not pragmatic considerations.... This debate is no longer an intellectual discussion--if it ever was. As a result, a flanking move might be required. It is time for central banks to assume responsibility and implement ‘helicopter money’... [**Read MOAR at Project Syndicate](https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/helicopter-money-fiscal-stimulus-by-j--bradford-delong-2016-04) Continue reading
**Taryn Miller**: [Your Friend: Gumption: Come Back From It](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye8z8J1EoLA&ab_channel=DominoRecordingCo.): Continue reading
* **Lecture:** [The International Economy](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000SXaxtmZiLsjDN3_dlzAAEg#2016-04-25_Econ_1_Spring_2016_UC_Berkeley_Lecture_International) [Webcast](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4H2eBNZU5A&ab_channel=UCBerkeley) (ch. 26) (2016-04-25 Mo) * **Pieces:** [Review of Macroeconomics](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000pTCL-TMDdi18_q4jIWPC-Q#2016-04-25a_Review_of_Macroeconomics) || [2016-04-25 Administrivia](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000sicTXvcic5tu9_beE6tUZQ#2016-04-25b_Administrivia) || [Macroeconomics--The Other Side](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000jrRav2O3WUoZ8xwMcIXMTg#2016-04-25c_Macroeconomics--The_Other_Side) || International: [Introduction](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000iaMsWOnQek9eoOfm0Zvdkw#2016-04-25d_International_Introduction) | [Four Patterns](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000fLzjrZmzJij7xCx0ePS3kg#2016-04-25e_International_Four_Patterns) | [Five Processes](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000OfK9SKKFhEM2MrX9A1r8Kw#2016-04-25f_International_Five_Processes) | [Summary](https://www.icloud.com/keynote/000tfXhxFVcVfSKY1ox9iRZ7g#2016-04-25g_International_Summary) || * **Section Exercise:** [Dollar Cycles and Monetary Policy](http://delong.typepad.com/files/2016-04-25-section-exercises-econ-1-s16-ucb.pdf) Continue reading
**Harry S. Truman**: [To Bess Wallace](http://www.trumanlibrary.org/whistlestop/study_collections/trumanpapers/fbpa/index.php?documentid=HST-FBP_4-10_01&documentVersion=both): >Commerce, Okla. April 27, 1916 >Dear Bess: >Your letter came today. I have been looking for it since Tuesday. I think this postmaster is nearly as bad as the cross-eyed woman was before him. He held out a letter of Mr. Hughes' in the general delivery this week. If I had not asked for it, I guess he'd never have gotten it. We have been very busy this week firing the superintendent and sinking the shaft. The superintendent won't fire worth a cent. Says he is going to stay until Saturday and draw his fifty dollars. I suppose I shall have trouble with him on that day. >The mill is running full blast today. We'll probably have a car of ore by the middle of next week. My worries as to where next week's payroll is going to come from will be over then. I have been very much worried about Mamma, she was very sick the first of the week but I had a letter from Mary saying she is better now. I wanted to go home most awful bad but couldn't leave here. >I am glad you liked the Sunday package. Jerry... Continue reading
**Live from the Mid-Twentieth Century: George Orwell**: [Wikiquote](https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/George_Orwell): "If one harbours anywhere in one's mind a nationalistic loyalty or hatred... >...certain facts, although in a sense known to be true, are inadmissible. Here are just a few examples. I list below five types of nationalist, and against each I append a fact which it is impossible for that type of nationalist to accept, even in his secret thoughts: >>BRITISH TORY. Britain will come out of this war with reduced power and prestige. >>COMMUNIST. If she had not been aided by Britain and America, Russia would have been defeated by Germany. >>IRISH NATIONALIST. Eire can only remain independent because of British protection. >>TROTSKYIST. The Stalin regime is accepted by the Russian masses. >>PACIFIST. Those who 'abjure' violence can only do so because others are committing violence on their behalf. >All of these facts are grossly obvious if one's emotions do not happen to be involved: but to the kind of person named in each case they are also intolerable, and so they have to be denied, and false theories constructed upon their denial. I come back to the astonishing failure of military prediction in the present war. It is, I think,... Continue reading
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**Over at [Equitable Growth](http://EquitableGrowth.org): Must-Reads:** * [Memo to self: Monetary policy since 1985 - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/memo-to-self-monetary-policy-since-1985/) * **Nick Bunker**: [Competition in the U.S. labor market - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/competition-u-s-labor-market/) * **Nick Bunker**: [The basic economics of a guaranteed income - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/the-not-so-basic-economics-of-a-guaranteed-income/) * **Austin Clemens and Nick Bunker**: [An interactive history of U.S. labor force participation - Equitable Growth](http://equitablegrowth.org/interactive-history-us-labor-participation/)* **David Glasner**: [What’s Wrong with Monetarism?](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25434) * **Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren**: [The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility](http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/hendren/files/nbhds_paper.pdf): W@4PM, Wells-Fargo Room: Stream: * **John Stoehr**: [Thomas Frank and the Illusion of Presidential Omnipotence](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25380) * **Omer Moav**: [Geography, Transparency, and Institutions](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25369) ---- **Should Reads:** * **Noah Smith**: [Life Update: Leaving Stony Brook, Joining Bloomberg View](http://noahpinionblog.blogspot.com/2016/04/life-update-leaving-stony-brook-joining.html) * **Ben Zipperer**: [Equitable Growth in Conversation: An interview with David Card and Alan Krueger](http://equitablegrowth.org/equitable-growth-in-conversation-an-interview-with-david-card-and-alan-krueger/) * **Gavyn Davies**: [Is there a new Plaza Accord?](http://blogs.ft.com/gavyndavies/2016/04/24/is-there-a-new-plaza-accord/) * **Alvin Chang**: [Most Bernie Sanders supporters aren't willing to pay for his revolution](http://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/4/14/11421744/bernie-sanders-tax-revolution) * **Julia Belluz and Alvin Chang**: [What research on English dukes can teach us about why the rich live longer](http://www.vox.com/2016/4/25/11501370/health-longevity-inequality-life-expectancy) * **Francis Wilkinson**: [Coal Country Is Desperate for Donald Trump](http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2016-04-25/coal-country-is-desperate-for-donald-trump) * **Susannah Locke**: [How to debunk false beliefs without having it backfire](http://www.vox.com/2014/12/22/7433899/debunk-how-to) * [Roman Empire GDP Per Capita Map... Continue reading
**Must-Read:** An excellent read from the very sharp David Glasner. I, however, disagree with the conclusion: the standard reaction of most economists to empirical failure is to save the phenomena and add another epicycle. Why not do that in this case too? Why not, as someone claimed to me that John Taylor once said, stabilize nominal GDP by passing a law mandating the Federal Reserve keep velocity-adjusted money growing at a constant rate? **David Glasner**: [What’s Wrong with Monetarism?](http://equitablegrowth.org/?p=25434): "DeLong balanced his enthusiasm for Friedman with a bow toward Keynes... >...noting the influence of Keynes on both classic and political monetarism, arguing that, unlike earlier adherents of the quantity theory, Friedman believed that a passive monetary policy was not the appropriate policy stance during the Great Depression; Friedman famously held the Fed responsible for the depth and duration of what he called the Great Contraction... in sharp contrast to hard-core laissez-faire opponents of Fed policy, who regarded even the mild and largely ineffectual steps taken by the Fed... as illegitimate interventionism to obstruct the salutary liquidation of bad investments, thereby postponing the necessary reallocation of real resources to more valuable uses.... But both agreed that there was no structural reason... Continue reading
**Must-See: Raj Chetty and Nathaniel Hendren**: [The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility](http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/hendren/files/nbhds_paper.pdf): W@4PM, Wells-Fargo Room: Stream: : "We characterize the effects of neighborhoods on children’s earnings and other outcomes in adult- hood... >...by studying more than five million families who move across counties in the U.S. Our analysis consists of two parts. In the first part, we present quasi-experimental evidence that neighborhoods affect intergenerational mobility through childhood exposure effects. In partiular, the outcomes of children whose families move to a better neighborhood – as measured by the outcomes of children already living there – improve linearly in proportion to the time they spend growing up in that area. We distinguish the causal effects of neighborhoods from confounding factors by comparing the outcomes of siblings within families, studying moves triggered by displacement shocks, and exploiting sharp variation in predicted place effects across birth cohorts, genders, and quantiles. We also document analogous childhood exposure effects for college attendance, teenage birth rates, and marriage rates. In the second part of the paper, we identify the causal effect of growing up in every county in the U.S. by estimating a fixed effects model identified from families who move across counties with children of... Continue reading
**Live from La Farine:** Duncan Black is anxious: Duncan Black**: [Hard to Kick the Habit](http://www.eschatonblog.com/2016/04/hard-to-kick-habit.html): "Hope to be wrong, but suspect that team Clinton (very broadly defined)... >...will still be talking about BernieBros in September. I'm quite happy for Hillary Clinton to be the nominee, as I always thought she would be. I'm not happy with the months of 'we would have won it easy if not for these meddling kids who won't vote in November' rhetoric. Better figure out how to appeal to them. Stop calling them immature and stupid. The goal is to win, not to make early excuses for why you're going to lose. Nah. After yesterday the word--and the obvious thing--is to stand down. Mind you: The day will come when it will be time to gleefully and comprehensively trash people to be named later for Guevarista fantasies about what their policies are likely to do. The day will come when it will be time to gleefully and comprehensively trash people to be named later for advocating Comintern-scale lying to voters about what our policies are like to do. And it will be important to do so then--because overpromising leads to bad policy decisions, and overpromising... Continue reading
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**Live from the Professional Centrists' Self-Made Gehenna:** People without morals or ethics department: **DougJ**: [Before they blow up the world](https://www.balloon-juice.com/2016/04/26/before-they-blow-up-the-world/): "When I say that professional centrists frighten me much more than wingers... >...I am being completely serious. Let’s look at this passage by Jim VandeHei that Anne Laurie highlighted this morning: >>Exploit the fear factor. The candidate should be from the military or immediately announce someone with modern-warfare expertise or experience as running mate. People are scared. Terrorism is today’s World War and Americans want a theory for dealing with it. President Obama has established an intriguing precedent of using drone technology and intelligence to assassinate terrorists before they strike. A third-party candidate could build on death-by-drones by outlining the type of modern weapons, troops and war powers needed to keep America safe. And make plain when he or she will use said power. Do it with very muscular language—there is no market for nuance in the terror debate… >And let’s remember this David Broder classic: >>Here is where Obama is likely to prevail. With strong Republican support in Congress for challenging Iran’s ambition to become a nuclear power, he can spend much of 2011 and 2012 orchestrating a showdown... Continue reading
Brad DeLong : Lloyd Bentsen Dies: As my boss Alicia Munnell said in 1993: "After a week working for Bentsen you understand why he is the Treasury Secretary and you are not, and you are happy that that is the way it is." >Former Democratic Sen. Lloyd Bentsen Dies - Yahoo! News: HOUSTON - Lloyd Bentsen, a courtly Texan who represented the state in Congress for 28 years and served as President Clinton's first treasury secretary, died Tuesday, his family said. He was 85.... >Bentsen's distinguished political career took him from the humble beginnings of a county office in the Rio Grande Valley in the 1940s to six years in the U.S. House, 22 in the U.S. Senate and two in the Clinton Cabinet, where he was instrumental in directing the administration's economic policy. >A shrewd legislative operator, the silver-haired politician maneuvered with ease in Democratic and Republican circles alike on Capitol Hill, crafting deals behind the scenes in a dispassionate, reserved fashion..... >The scion of a wealthy Rio Grande Valley family, Bentsen first distinguished himself in World War II, where he flew 50 bomber missions over Europe. Returning home as a decorated veteran, the 25-year-old was elected Hidalgo County... Continue reading
**Live Drunjblogging from Claremont Hotel Bar:** Even when confronted with this: **Donald J. Trump**: [On Twitter](https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/507158574670573568): I am being proven right about massive vaccinations—the doctors lied. Save our children & their future.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 3, 2014 Jim VandeHei still lacks the ovaries to woman up and say: This year, vote for the Democrat. SAD!!1! Continue reading
* ****: [interfluidity » Moral heuristics, public policy, and self-defeating tribalism](http://www.interfluidity.com/v2/998.html) * [Interfluidity :: Krugman's "hangover theory", revisited.](http://www.interfluidity.com/posts/1230410023.shtml) * [interfluidity » Tragedy of the technocrats](http://www.interfluidity.com/v2/983.html) * [interfluidity » Hangover theory and morality plays](http://www.interfluidity.com/v2/1004.html) Continue reading
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**Live Drunkblogging from the Claremont Hotel Bar:** Watching the sunset over San Francisco Bay out the big picture windows. My drinking companions have gone. I am not yet drunk enough to have forgotten that I shouldn't blog drunk. But I have drunk enough that I do not care. In other words, I have had one Lagunitas "Little Sumpin Extra" ale. (Hey: cut me a break1! It's 17 proof! And lots of it!~) This isn't even Anglisc! **Jim VandeHei**: [Bring on a Third-Party Candidate](http://www.wsj.com/articles/bring-on-a-third-party-candidate-1461624062): "A third-party candidate could build on death-by-drones by outlying... >...the type of modern weapons, troops and war powers needed to keep America safe. And make plain when he or she will use said power. Do it with very muscular language--there is no market for nuance in the terror debate... Did it ever occur to Jim VandeHei that George W. Bush and Richard Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld and Condi Rice and Colin Powell's idiocy has killed many more innocent peope than died on 9/11? And that all of their relatives are rightfully pissed?! Continue reading
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**Live Drunkblogging from the Claremont Hotel Bar:** Watching the sunset over San Francisco Bay out the big picture windows. My drinking companions have gone. I am not yet drunk enough to have forgotten that I shouldn't blog drunk. But I have drunk enough that I do not care. In other words, I have had one Lagunitas "Little Sumpin Extra" ale. (Hey: cut me a break1! It's 17 proof! And lots of it!~) **Jim VandeHei**: [Bring on a Third-Party Candidate](http://www.wsj.com/articles/bring-on-a-third-party-candidate-1461624062): "I have spent the past two decades in the Washington, D.C., bubble... >...the heart of Establishment America--covering politics and building a company, Politico, focused solely on politics. But I’ve also spent a lot of time in my hometown of Oshkosh, Wis., and my adopted hometown of Lincoln, Maine, two blue-collar towns in the heart of Normal America. Let's stop right there: It should read: >I’ve also spent a lot of time in my hometown of Oshkosh, Wis., and my adopted hometown of **a little time visiting relatives in Oshkosh, Wis. and some time five miles away from** Lincoln, Maine, two blue-collar towns in the heart of Normal America... FIXED!! >Here are my two big takeaways: Normal America is right that Establishment... Continue reading