This is Brad's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Brad's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Brad
Michigan
Recent Activity
Brad is now following The Typepad Team
Mar 15, 2010
And I think you are on the right track. Once you recognize that somebody is all work all the time is when they become less valuable to follow, in my opinion. I mean, show some personality, you know? As always, thanks for the comment!
1 reply
Thanks for the comment. Page rank, public relations. It's similar, right?
1 reply
Jon, if I can inspire one person to clean out their inbox and get their work in order, I've done my job. Thanks for the comment!
Toggle Commented Feb 25, 2010 on Six Steps To a Healthy Inbox at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
Thanks, Kelly! I appreciate the kind words.
Toggle Commented Feb 22, 2010 on One Year Into a Blogging Life at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
Thanks for taking a moment to comment, and for being one of my "repeat customers." It's the regular readers who keep me going. I truly appreciate the time you take to provide feedback. Here's to 365 more days! At least!
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2010 on One Year Into a Blogging Life at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
Thanks for the comment, Lorelei. Funny, but a lot of people in the US also have misconceptions about what PR is. Guess we need to change that.
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2010 on One Year Into a Blogging Life at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
Thank you!
Toggle Commented Feb 19, 2010 on One Year Into a Blogging Life at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
The press release is only going to die if we let it. There is still much value in it; you just need to know how to use it. Thanks for your comment!
1 reply
Jon - Yep. And the reason they are being retweeted is not because their followers find the content valuable, but because their followers want to name drop. It's kind of like if I happened to run into a celebrity talking on their cell phone and I heard their phone conversation, then bragged to my friends that I heard the conversation. I'm only informative by association.
Toggle Commented Jan 11, 2010 on All The Twitty Girls at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
You make a good point about the number of followers. That didn't factor into the popularity idea; it was more along the lines of 'Great, here we go again.' But if, like you suggest, we eliminate the the number of followers, we can (hopefully) eliminate the popularity contest aspect of Twitter. Let's face it: that's why these women were chosen for the article.
Toggle Commented Jan 8, 2010 on All The Twitty Girls at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
Thanks for taking a second to leave a comment. Clients want the most bang for their buck. That hasn't changed. But when their money needs to be stretched further, it's not a bad idea to show them my they're making a good investment.
1 reply
Jon, thanks for the comment. And you're right - you have to stay ahead of the story. That's especially true when you know the real story isn't pretty.
1 reply
I've given some thought to changing to Wordpress but it seems like a huge undertaking and is a little confusing. I just don't have the time right now. I also agree with your thinking re: commenting. I'd much rather have a comment. So...thanks for commenting!
Toggle Commented Oct 19, 2009 on To Retweet or Leave a Comment? at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply
There are a lot of lazy PR professionals who give the hard-working ones a bad name. I wish I could tell you the contents of this list is some big secret, but it's not. Most of it is public relations 101.
1 reply
I am hesitant to name the blogger-in-question because my intention was not to start something. Rather, I wanted to illustrate how a new blogger (like me) might go about getting their content in front of new audiences. If I take the time to share feedback with a blogger who is openly soliciting it, I expect the same in return. It seems like a no-brainer, but what do I know?
1 reply
Emily, thanks for reading and commenting. I am of the opinion that the freshman's answers to the questions regarding their grueling schedule is what sparked this investigation. But what really amazed me (and is why I felt compelled to write) is how many people claimed this was a "non-story"; as if the Free Press just decided to make up a story and run with it. It's truly mind-boggling. As for the content of the story, Rosenberg was not obligated to compare U of M's practice schedule to other schools. That might add some color to the story, but how likely is it he would find other student athletes at other schools willing to talk? A football player at MSU isn't going to rat out his coach when U of M is taking all the heat. I do agree that he could have fleshed out the story with on-the-record quotes, but sometimes that isn't possible. He probably figured six sources was enough, and I can't say that I blame him.
1 reply
It was my pleasure.
1 reply
Thank you. And you have my permission to steal the xx posts in xx days idea.
1 reply
The Jeff Goldblum example is a good one. On a site such as Twitter, where it's like hundreds of people yelling you at the same time, you have to write something that will capture attention. Something else I thought of after I wrote this is that TMZ has less of a reputation, so they have less to lose if their rumor was untrue, whereas CNN has to be absolutely sure somebody is dead before they confirm it.
1 reply
I know! And look - I just did it.
Toggle Commented Jun 10, 2009 on Comments. at Brad Marley's Blog
1 reply