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BMGelinas
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Wil, As a writer myself, I couldn't agree more with your reference to the line in Stand By Me. I've always felt that scene says more about writing and how a writer feels about his craft than any writer could probably ever put into words to make a non-writer understand being "in the zone." I have often made reference to that scene when trying to explain to friends and family what writing means to me. I'll just say to them, "Watch the last scene in Stand By Me, if you want to understand where I'm coming from." So, it was great to see another writer make the same reference. It was also great to read about your writing habits when at the computer. When I was reading those lines, I felt like I was reading about myself. I've done the exact same thing many times during my allotted writing time. But, as expressed in this blog, there are many aspects to being a writer aside from the writing of the words alone. And those who are not writers will probably never fully understand what that means. I particularly liked your reminiscence about having to apologize to your wife about "not being in the same place" at times when you're together. I was nodding to myself in agreement and grinning a little. I've been there many times, as I'm sure many writers have. And what a great feeling it is when we are!
Toggle Commented Jun 26, 2009 on time to write at WWdN: In Exile
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Congratulations on this latest creative opportunity. Best of luck to you tomorrow. Just don't think about the fact it's going to be Friday the 13th!
Toggle Commented Mar 12, 2009 on stupid murphy's law can bite me. at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, your success with Sunken Treasure proves that as long as an author produces a quality product that is well-written and edited, the avenue used to bring it into print should be of little consequence. There are quality books being printed through both the traditional publishing houses and self-publishing/POD companies, just as there are books being printed via both that probably shouldn't be. As has happened with independently produced movies and music CDs, the negative light by which self-publishing/POD books have been viewed is slowly fading with each quality product released, and with each success such as your own. As a fellow author, I have long felt the criticism against self-publishing was not entirely warranted. In fact, my first young adult novel was self-published through a POD company in October 2006. I took that route because I felt strongly I had a quality story that deserved an audience. I wanted to get it out there and get it seen, with the hope the right doors might open. And they have. Back in November I signed an option/purchase agreement for the movie/TV rights and things are progressing incredibly well. The book remains self-published at the moment, but that is likely to change in the near future. And I'm happy to know any success I realize will help to lessen the stigma authors face when choosing to self-publish.
Toggle Commented Mar 4, 2009 on a few self-publishing resources at WWdN: In Exile
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I posted the following link off-topic on the LA Daily: Winter Mute posting. Figured I'd put it here, too, where it is, after all, most appropriate. It's an on-line article on Obama's inauguration titled "The Meaning of the Moment." I think Wil and many of the rest of you will appreciate it, if you haven't already seen it. Here's the link: http://www.theroot.com/views/meaning-moment?GT1=38002
Toggle Commented Jan 23, 2009 on choosing hope over fear at WWdN: In Exile
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Wil, I don't usually post comments off topic, but since it is Obama's inauguration day, I wanted to forward this link as I thought the story might interest you and in case you hadn't seen it yet: http://www.theroot.com/views/meaning-moment?GT1=38002 And to be on topic: There's nothing wrong with sentimentality, regardless of gender or age.
Toggle Commented Jan 20, 2009 on LA Daily: Winter Mute at WWdN: In Exile
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I'm a writer and one of the many readers of this blog, and among those who were pointed in the direction of Ficlets by you, Wil, and you have my thanks. I'm also among those who had the chance to sequel a sequel to a Ficlet of yours titled "Real Life" (http://ficlets.com/stories/27848). A fellow Ficleteer (Tony Mannor) and I actually took off on that string for several postings. In a farewell Ficlet I posted the other day (http://ficlets.com/stories/48710), I publicly thank you there, too, and plug your blog -- a return favor for leading me to Ficlets to begin with. Of course, it sucks for all of us who enjoyed that site that it's being so heartlessly destroyed. My Ficlets originals and sequels have been backed up at home, and I look forward to a new version if and when it is created by K. Lawver and others. In my brief Ficlets bio, I mention I was taking part on the site for "creative writing warm-ups", and I did find it broke the writing block many times. It was great to log on and either jump into an original piece or sequel someone else's piece that offered inspiration. The character limit was great, as it forced the author to refine and tighten the writing so it could be the best it could be. Many Ficlets I read were superb in their originality and story development in such a short space, and in their completeness in and of themselves. As I write in my farewell Ficlet, participating in that on-line community "was, to me, reminiscent of my college creative writing classes—writing original material, collaborating, sharing, critiquing. A lot of fun!" I hadn't logged on to Ficlets in several months, until just last week, as I have been working on a major off-line writing project. So, it was certainly a surprise -- and shock -- to see that such a well-used site was being abruptly shutdown. It will be missed. I, too, was once among those who used AOL and have since dropped it. Is it any wonder why? In any event, thanks again, Wil.
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@Wil: It couldn't have been said better. All veterans have my thanks as well. @Merindab: Here's wishing your husband a safe return.
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@fritzk3: Yeah, unlimited power can be scary. So let's not forget that prior to the first W. term the majority of the Supreme Court justices were Republican President appointees. What happened then? Oh, yeah, an election was stolen in 2000. And let's not forget what happened after W. was handed the presidency in his first term by his brother's state and the Supreme Court, and all three branches were under Republican influence: a second election was stolen in 2004. Oh yeah, and let's not forget the dictatorial path the Bush Administration was marching merrily down during his second term. (I think the post quoting Grand Moff Tarkin said it well in a satirical sort of way.) Good riddance W. Welcome, bright, new day of hope, promise and freedom. Congratulations, fellow Americans of all walks of life, on taking back this country.
Toggle Commented Nov 5, 2008 on YES WE DID at WWdN: In Exile
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Well, the polls have only been open in Virginia for a few hours and already there are issues at the polls with machines breaking down. Go figure. I find it hard to believe that this will be third election in which there will likely turn out to be controversy over the voting in certain states. And isn't it curious that the issues always seem to arise in the battleground swing states and nowhere else? I mean, really, people have been voting in this country for over 200 years, and then out of nowhere within the last 8 years our system is suddenly so flawed in certain parts of the country? I don't buy it, myself. It's almost as if the Republicans are again setting the stage for another contested and stolen election. Let's hope not, though.
Toggle Commented Nov 4, 2008 on one last time . . . at WWdN: In Exile
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Regarding the Twitter as Terrorist Tool story, personally, I think it's rather ridiculous. If you think about it, any number of the technological tools at our disposal today can be used in ways unintended. Does that mean the move should be on to attempt to further restrict freedoms in this country by any number of means, such as implementing governmental Internet controls which prevent the general, law-abiding population from using it at will and for the free exchange of ideas and information? As a newspaper journalist who firmly stands behind the First Amendment, I certainly don't think so. It would be a slap in the face to our Founding Fathers and to us. After all, this country rose to greatness due, in part, to the unrestricted freedoms afforded its citizens, and that very exchange of ideas and information of all types. Yes, I agree, monitor the Internet for suspicious activity that could be terrorist-oriented and act accordingly against those suspected individuals when needed, but don't trample on the rest of us in the process.
Toggle Commented Oct 28, 2008 on more fun with twitter at WWdN: In Exile
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Did you catch this story about Twitter, in which government officials believe it could be a potential terrorist tool? Here's the link: www.switched.com/2008/10/27/twitter-a-potential-terrorist-tool/
Toggle Commented Oct 28, 2008 on more fun with twitter at WWdN: In Exile
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Correction to previous post: film rights, not film writes -- obviously.
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Wil, as a fellow writer, I could not agree more with your advice. But I was wondering, what advice would you give to someone who has been approached about the availability of film writes for a novel he has written?
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Cool painting, sincerely.
Toggle Commented Aug 16, 2008 on thirty-seven? in a row? at WWdN: In Exile
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I would add that, in my opinion, it seems people who are attempting to, or actually do make remakes are simply reaching to make a name for themselves by riding the coat tails of someone else's success or popularity, rather than making their own name based on an original effort. There's a reason most remakes suck, too. I mean, really, think about it. Never mind Rocky Horror. Can you imagine a remake of Casablanca, Gone With The Wind, Easy Rider, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Dances With Wolves, Stand By Me, or any number of others? Not in a million years. Not ever. What's next? Re-writing the classic novels?
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I think it's artistically criminal to attempt to remake any of the classics -- campy ones or otherwise. They're classics for a reason, and don't need updating. Find new material. There's a lot out there. I'll second what Sally J. said: Great story. It brought me back to my first time seeing Rocky Horror at the midnight movies at a nearby mall when I was 17. Only, a close friend of mine who'd been before was the one to reveal my Rocky virginity and my younger brother's. Certainly an experience to remember.
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Thanks for the early morning laugh to get another work day started off on the right foot!
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Congrats on your newest role. There's nothing like the feeling you get when the creative and artistic juices are flowing, regardless of the medium. Look forward to catching your Criminal Minds stint and your observations to follow once it airs.
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@Toby O: A Fourth Amendment refresher: "Amendment Four The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures , shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue , but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."
Toggle Commented Jul 14, 2008 on EPIC FAIL at WWdN: In Exile
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@pojut: I, for one, am aware of how Obama voted on the three amendment proposals (it's mentioned in the blog article to which I provided the link and I keep abreast of the news). Given that, we have to question why his final vote was in favor of a bill that retained that immunity provision. Something doesn't gel with his obvious flip-flop. And more than just griping about Obama's single vote, this particular post and its comments are expressing concern over the continued increase in unchecked government abuse and the loss of constitutionally-guaranteed rights. Any American should be rightly concerned.
Toggle Commented Jul 10, 2008 on EPIC FAIL at WWdN: In Exile
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"Change WE CAN'T Believe In" -- That should be our new slogan for the Obama campaign. His vote is absolutely disgusting and concerning at the same time. I offer this snippet from best-selling author Glenn Greenwald's blog article on the subject (posted 7/9/08): "Obama’s vote in favor of cloture, in particular, cemented the complete betrayal of the commitment he made back in October when seeking the Democratic nomination. Back then, Obama’s spokesman -- in response to demands for a clear statement of Obama’s views on the spying controversy after he had previously given a vague and noncommittal statement -- issued this emphatic vow: 'To be clear: Barack will support a filibuster of any bill that includes retroactive immunity for telecommunications companies.' "But the bill today does include retroactive immunity for telecommunications companies. Nonetheless, Obama voted for cloture on the bill -- the exact opposition of supporting a filibuster -- and then voted for the bill itself. A more complete abandonment of an unambiguous campaign promise is difficult to imagine." With that said, we have to ask ourselves, what changed? Or was his vote indicative of his view on the matter all along? I believe Obama spoon-fed a false view back then to people eager to believe in him in order to help secure his nomination. To say I'm disappointed would be an understatement. I'm an Independent, and at this point once again undecided how my vote will go in November. Because another concern is: The alternative candidate -- John McCain -- couldn't even be bothered to vote? At least my home-state Sen. Ted Kennedy, with all his medical issues, made it to Congress for another crucial vote. Also of concern is this, when Greenwald goes on to write: "With their vote today, the Democratic-led Congress has covered up years of deliberate surveillance crimes by the Bush administration and the telecom industry, and has dramatically advanced a full-scale attack on the rule of law in this country. "Today, the Democratic-led Senate ignored ... protests, acted to protect the single most flagrant act of Bush lawbreaking of the last seven years, eviscerated the core Fourth Amendment prohibition of surveillance without warrants, gave an extraordinary and extraordinarily corrupt gift to an extremely powerful corporate lobby, and cemented the proposition that the rule of law does not apply to the Washington Establishment." The full text of Greenwald's blog can be accessed here: http://www.salon.com/opinion/greenwald/2008/07/09/fisa_vote/index.html To close, I have to say this latest stripping of our freedoms should be of serious concern to all Americans, and should serve to make us scrutinize all the closer the motives of those who wish to lead us. Such moves tend to give credence to a statement made occasionally by a friend of mine in light of such actions, here and abroad, that the world overall is edging closer to a complete totalitarianism. It reminds me of that scenario in which you can purportedly cook a live frog without the frog knowing it, just by placing it in a pan and little by little turning up the heat. Seems to me it's becoming no different in reality as our freedoms are stripped a little at a time. The only question is, how long will it be before a majority says "enough is enough"? In retrospect, the founding forefathers of this country said "enough was enough" over a lot less. One consolation: The oft-reviled ACLU has promised an immediate challenge of today's vote.
Toggle Commented Jul 10, 2008 on EPIC FAIL at WWdN: In Exile
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As just about all have previously said, your priorities are in order. There should be no expectation on anyone's part that you should reveal any more than you already have. I wish you all the best in dealing with whatever has been unexpectedly thrown your way. And, if you need something to take your mind off of whatever it is for a brief moment, I offer the following link to a light-hearted D&D-related ficlet I came across today (http://ficlets.com/stories/32791). Again, take care, and all the best to you and your family.
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Shit, I was so pissed by Stern's obvious badgering and manipulation of the conversation, I forgot to say in my last post, thanks, Wil, for the Stand By Me recollection (even if it was brought about by a less than welcome situation). Stand By Me is also in my list of top movies, and it was great to get that brief "behind the scenes" look as to what the experience was like for you guys.
Toggle Commented May 14, 2008 on itchy feet and fading smiles at WWdN: In Exile
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As others have already said, it's understandable you would want to set the record straight, if you were actually misrepresented. However, if the transcription of the conversation posted by Load Star is accurate, it's clear Stern was doing the very asshole, and very tired "shock jock" thing and trying to twist Jerry's words into something he was not even intending to say. I say, sic Chopper on 'im!
Toggle Commented May 14, 2008 on itchy feet and fading smiles at WWdN: In Exile
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Thanks for the turn-on to Ficlets. As a published creative writer who's been experiencing some writer's block of late, it's just what I needed to break out of my unwelcomed funk. So far, I've published an original Ficlet and wrote a sequel to a sequel written as a spin-off to your Ficlet titled "Real Life." In turn, the author of the first sequel has picked up where mine left off and added another installment, which has my mind churning, trying to piece together the next episode in Gary's life. I think a very interesting character is being developed as a result of your first introduction to him. If you happen to check out where we've taken it, I'd be interested in hearing your opinion on what we've done with your idea. All for now.
Toggle Commented May 10, 2008 on in which i write a prequel at WWdN: In Exile
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