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Brianvan
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Aside from the QA/testing roles, those other careers seem to exist in discrete professional silos that recruiters do not like to breach. Particularly, programmers seem to get pigeonholed into programming, and are not deemed fit to be given a chance at sales/management/business analyst roles unless they already have a professional history working in those roles. My direct evidence for this may be anecdotal, but I would bet statistically, if you could measure it, you'd find recruiters being nearly completely unresponsive to resumes from programmers into any one of those other roles. We could also ask a couple of recruiters (crowdsourcing!) for their opinion on the matter, and my guess is that they prefer to adhere to the job requirements that they are given by their hiring managers, and not take chances speculating on someone's career leap. Plus, they play a role in shaping the requirements in job specifications by advising their managers, and if it's anything but an entry-level role (of which there are none in corporate America anymore, and that's not just a bitter lament but a pretty solid fact), they'll suggest requiring the rote 2, 5, etc. years minimum experience in the same role from the applicant. This is not a problem that programmers or recruiters may think much about, but it is a problem worth solving. It's also worth thinking that the complaints of weary soon-to-be ex-programmers may have some observations about the state of the field that are worth taking in. "Stupidly complex stuff", "fighting against the computer", "dumb errors"... that all resonates. It's really difficult to find a role where that stuff doesn't get in the way of achieving creative results in a fluid manner. Of course, that could also be just a result of using really crude dev tools (and that's quite common out there). Just because someone else only uses nano to code an entire application doesn't mean that's a good way to do it.
Brianvan is now following The Typepad Team
Apr 29, 2013