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Calton Bolick
Interests: movies, books, good food, patrick o'brian
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This reminds me of John Hodgman's differentiation between nerds and hipsters. To paraphrase: Nerds are people who have particular -- and often narrow -- obsessions (such as science fiction, board games, Doctor Who, the Boston Red Sox, the history of the international silk trade) and who are eager to share their love with the world at large. Hipsters, on the other hand, will use knowledge of particular -- and often narrow -- cultural markers as cudgels in order to gain status, even if it's only inside their own heads. ("I knew that band when they were still cool and obscure" or "You don't use artisanal mayonnaise on your free-range chicken sandwiches?") In short, nerds try to be inclusive, hipsters try to be exclusive.
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"Not sure why the summary phrases it in that way" Because the Venetian example lets him talk about network effects and technological progress, and what that technological progress wrought.
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"What should I call them?" Bullet points.
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Back in the 70s there was a fire on Mt. Diablo big enough to cover an entire face, which made for a rather spectacular nighttime photograph that became the cover of the Mt Diablo High School yearbook that year.
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I can understand the National Review posting such garbage because, well, it's the National Review. But The Chronicle of Higher Education? Buh?
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Wait, you're posting a link to ALEX F#&%ING JONES'S website?! Really?
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I read "Lucifer's Hammer" back when I still read SF and was a Larry Niven fan. God almighty, I couldn't believe how nakedly racist and clumsy the climax was, with the stalwart white technophiles defending a nuclear power plant -- their hope for the future of humanity, according the dying breath of their leader -- from cannibalistic, slave-holding black radical National Guard deserters. I wasn't very familiar with Pournelle, so couldn't believe that anyone in the late 20th century who called himself a professional writer and/or a decent human being could write such tripe.
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Man, I've got to get me one of those. Aren't you also issued a pipe to go with the tweed jacket?
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Can't say I'm surprised: on a recent the NYT Book Review podcast (which Tanenhaus hosts), he had to have explained to him by a book reviewer why Ed Klein is a truthless hack. Tanenhaus seemed quite surprised by this revelation.
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THIS is a million-dollar house? Oy, I've been away from Berkeley for too long. Call me a cheapskate, but I wouldn't pay a million bucks for a house unless there were a working gold mine in the backyard.
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Boy, I wonder if the Freakonomics boys are feeling particularly foolish right about now. Myhrvold really snowed them.
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"It's not good to locate reactors near fault lines." Since the earthquake happened in the middle of the freaking ocean and nowhere near the nuclear plant in question, I'd be hard-pressed to understand how this relates to this incident, no matter how many times you cut-and-paste it into comment threads. Even ignoring that point, where, exactly, would you suggest placing a nuclear plant in a country as chock-a-block with faults as Japan?
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As someone who actually lives in range of the disaster area -- like the original blog poster, I live in Kawasaki -- I can't see why I'm supposed to take the word of a supply-chain-management specialist just because he has "Ph.d" after his name, any more than I would rely upon, say, an economics professor for commodities investment advice.
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Ocean side? Not in central Costa County it isn't. Drive through the Caldecott Tunnel from Berkeley in summer and the temperature takes a noticeable leap once you emerge on the other side of the tunnel. It's certainly hot and dry enough in your neighborhood to FEEL like the desert in summer. Signed, Delivered Mail on Your Street a Decade Ago So Knows the Climate
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Kevin, calling it a "factually incorrect statement" is like saying the RMS Titanic had stability problems on its maiden voyage. It's either a blatantly obvious lie, a blatantly stupid factoid pulled out of Coburn's ass -- though as a politician allegedly directly dealing with the issue, he might be expected to be aware, at least, of the correct order of magnitude of the statistics he throws out -- or (as someone points out above) a Freudian slip where he reveals that he considers ALL Medicaid spending to be a waste. Given Coburn's politics, the last bit makes perfect sense, sadly. Lumping ALL factually incorrect statements ever made by anyone together and saying this is equivalent? I evaluate that attempt at political rationalization as, well, pathetic.
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Mar 15, 2010
What a weird coincidence: this very book, whose British paperback edition I picked up at a used-book store here in Tokyo a few weeks ago, has been -- quite literally -- sitting on my desk since then (yes, I'm a slow filer). It will now go directly to my bedside table, as Professor DeLong has just moved it to the top of my reading list.
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It's even worse than the post suggests: not only didn't George Stephanopoulos challenge Rudy on the blatant falsehood during the interview, but the blog posting you're linking to, when it was first posted (and when I saw it originally), didn't challenge the falsehood, either and even included the falsehood in the posting's HEDE ("Rudy Giuliani: 'No domestic attacks under Bush, One under Obama'", check the URL itself and you can see that he forgot to change that). George added the ass-covering "Giuliani seems to have forgotten about the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and shoe bomber Richard Reid" after the fact, I'm sure, because I don't recall seeing THAT in the original. So George Stephanopoulos screwed up -- twice -- and has rewritten the history. Now, it's not surprising that Rudy lied -- for that smarmy little toad, it's as natural as breathing -- but what's infuriating is George Stephanopoulos' failure, since he ought to know better. George, acknowledge your mistakes instead of trying to hide them, or just quit your job and let someone who actually knows what he or she is doing take it instead. Why oh WHY can't we have a better press corps?
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And no, I've had no problems with airport security, though it's true that the TSA at Newark somehow overlooked the heavy-duty nail clippers I had dropped right into the tray at the metal detector, so maybe that's not saying much.
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Hey, I've got one of those, and have had it for years. Probably picked it up at Restoration Hardware on one of my trips to the US (I live in Japan). VERY useful gadget, including the period when my eyeglass screws kept falling out and I used the gadget to repair them. And yes, it looks just like a key, so easy to conceal.
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My ego's quite fine, thank you. My patience with morons -- particularly persistent ones, and especially persistent lying ones -- is rather thinner, however. You WERE blocked -- by IP number, which you dodged by the simple expediency of using a different one this time. I've helpfully included those numbers in your comments so you can see. Kita Cable the first few times, KDDI the most recent. As persistent --- and thick -- as you've shown yourself to be, I guess your next stop will be your neighborhood Internet café so you can indulge in some more dick-waving, but since you'll be paying for the privilege and contributing to the salaries of the café employees, I can't really object to the positive effect on the economy. Of course, you'll still be disemvoweled and blocked so it will be pointless, but hey, everyone needs a hobby, even gaijin morons with self-control issues. Good luck with that treatment, by the way!
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2009 on Obama in Tokyo at And So It Goes
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Oh, and I've blocked you from any further commenting, so you're free to go back to your drinking and moaning. Say hello to Nick Griffin for me, will you, the next time you see him?
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2009 on Obama in Tokyo at And So It Goes
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Don't flatter yourself, moron, it wasn't a "hurried" update: it was one of the many photos I took that day, and I'd already uploaded it before your previous bit of superior--minded-yet-utterly-unearned idiocy was posted. Let me guess: you read The Daily Mail and you move your lips when you do so. 'The car' refers to the vehicle that is blocking any meaningful view of any other cars in that photo Ah, so the answer is you can't count. Grammar school not work out for you? however sarcasm from an American is a rare collectible treat Buckwheat, "sarcasm" is the Designated Mode of Expression for the entire city of New York, so you're sounder even stupider. News of the World your paper, then?
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2009 on Obama in Tokyo at And So It Goes
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And what do you mean by "the car"? There are at least a dozen vehicles in the original photo: don't know how to count either? Or is the whole "definite article" thing in the English language a bit of a challenge for you?
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2009 on Obama in Tokyo at And So It Goes
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I'm not a press photographer, Mr Internet Tough Guy, I was using a camera phone. You've heard of those, right? They do let you use complicated stuff like that at your group home, right? Ask your attendant to explain it to you.
Toggle Commented Nov 14, 2009 on Obama in Tokyo at And So It Goes
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