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Camper English
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Pectinex, centrifuges, malic acid, and hydrosols: They're making your cocktails delicious. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Alcademics.com
Thanks and please do keep us updated. I made another recent attempt using a dehydrated (to a syrup) liqueur with all the alcohol out, and it took more than a week to start really crystallizing. So it might just take a super long time.
Toggle Commented 2 days ago on Rock Candy Swizzle at Alcademics.com
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May 2008: Inside the still room at Glenmorangie in Scotland. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Alcademics.com
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I'll be a panelist at an event at the National Archives in Washington, DC. You know, the place where they keep the Declaration of Independence? That place. No big deal. Continue reading
Posted Jul 23, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Hi Mike - I haven't tried the mineral pre-mix and unfortunately I'm not knowledgeable enough about the rest of your question, particularly whether things are healthy/safe or not, to answer.
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I gave two full-length seminars and one mini-seminar at Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans this year. For my seminar on Prehistoric Cocktail Technology, I went kinda big. This post is my packing list, with its 99 items. Ridiculous. Continue reading
Posted Jul 20, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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June 2012: Laprhoaig's master distiller John Campbell cutting peat on Islay. Learn more about it here. Continue reading
Posted Jul 19, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Hi! I'm at the Tales of the Cocktail convention in New Orleans as I am every year this time. It is very hot here. I may not have time to post, or not post very much this week, but you can follow along in some of the shenanigans on social media. Continue reading
Posted Jul 15, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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September 2009: A cooper at Hennessy Cognac repairs a barrel for aging. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted Jul 12, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Dalva in San Francisco has launched a short new drink menu with origami instructions as an activity to do while you wait for your Tinder date to show up. Continue reading
Posted Jul 10, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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The latest of Trick Dog's inventive cocktail menus is released, and this time it comes in the form of an adorable doggie calendar. Awwww. Continue reading
Posted Jul 8, 2015 at Alcademics.com
The distillery is not open to the public, at least not for now.
Toggle Commented Jul 8, 2015 on Tequila Distillery Visit: Patron at Alcademics.com
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Stephen Shellenberger, writer of the Bostonapothecary blog, will be giving a 5-week class on Culinary Aestheticism this fall at the SMFA in Boston. You can find it in the fall course catalog. I wish I could go, so you go instead. Shellenberger sat down with himself to write this interview about the class. So how did the class come to be? The woman who runs the program is a restaurant regular and also an abstract painter. In the past, we had talked about painters like Wassily Kandinsky & Hans Hoffman and my art world hero, Leonard Koren. She really liked... Continue reading
Posted Jul 7, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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We'll be at the famous Napoleon House in the hours leading up to the Spirited Awards, where I will be losing for Best Cocktail Writer again this year. Continue reading
Posted Jul 6, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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May 2008: Cows in the Scottish Highlands on the way to the Speyburn distillery. A write-up here. Continue reading
Posted Jul 5, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Hi Lynn - Here is a response from Stephen Shellenberger of the amazingly nerdy http://bostonapothecary.com. He says: Hopefully this is coherent. First we’d have to investigate what you mean by vaporize in the context you are using it. When liquids in the still turn into a gas, we often say they evaporate but we could also say vaporize, though it comes with more connotations like something is destroyed, but that isn’t the case here. Luckily there isn’t much methanol to worry about in the first place, but I’ll get to that. Memory had failed me and I didn’t realize the stills of Armagnac were continuous. I thought they were just short batch column stills. When I revisited Hannum and Blumberg’s Brandies and Liqueurs of the World (1976), which has the best chapter on Armagnac, they had great descriptions of the stills. Something unique about these stills is they are noted for producing a spirit heavier than if a pot still was used. That is the opposite of every rule of thumb you’ll hear about every other spirits category. But these aren’t three story tall continuous vodka stills, they are very short and are not run to strip congeners as thoroughly as a vodka still. One reason they don’t have a traditional heads and tails cut is because as congeners are stacking up in the column in order of their volatility, the spirit is drawn off below the line of where the most volatile nasty stuff is accumulating. There is probably even a secondary vent to blow off some of this nasty stuff as it continues to accumulate. A healthy percentage of less volatile stuff makes it out before it starts to sink lower into the column. So concentration of each congener will be different in each part of the column and zones will start to form. How fast the spirit is drawn off, will shape how relatively at equilibrium congeners in the column are at and how many congeners are making it out. The relative equilibrium is implied by the distillation proof. The lower the proof the further from approaching equilibrium the column is, and the heavier the spirit will taste. The point on the column where spirit is drawn off also determines its character (above or below certain zones). The quickness of the continuous system means the spirit is probably less transformed in the still than other spirits and more transformed in post distillation aging. Now as far as methanol goes, it is far harder to separate by fractioning that many people think because methanol’s volatility is very similar to ethanol unlike other congeners where the volatilities are distinctly more different. In the Armagnac still, methanol would not exactly collect in any specific zone in the column. So with methanol, producers just do their best to avoid producing it in the first place. They only use sound fruit with no rot. They don’t use enzymes that would break down pectin producing methanol, and they are sensitive to how the fruit is juiced to limit pectin which is the source of methanol. So fruit based spirits have a permissible amount of methanol in them and they are tested for it. Grappa probably has the highest quantity because it is made from pectin heavy pomace and its probably up against the methanol limit. Some people wonder why we don’t have cider grappa and the reason is apple pomace has more pectin than grapes and the product of distilling it is over the permissible limit. Because the methanol can’t be practically separated, the apple pomace is simply discarded.
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Thank you for the research!
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I helped judge the Angostura rum/bitters Global Cocktail Challenge regionals in San Francisco last week, alongside Smuggler's Cove owner Martin Cate and Angostura brand ambassador David Delaney. Here's what happened. Continue reading
Posted Jul 1, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Nice! Glad you're getting the time off.
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October 2008: Rows of tiki mugs at Forbidden Island in Alameda. A bit about that day's tiki crawl here. Continue reading
Posted Jun 28, 2015 at Alcademics.com
It will definitely last longer that way.
Toggle Commented Jun 27, 2015 on Simple Syrup: It's Good to be Rich at Alcademics.com
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Tales of the Cocktail is a wonderful hellish nightmare of a cocktail convention held in New Orleans every year. I'm still filling out my schedule and may update this page, but here is where I am sure to be. Continue reading
Posted Jun 26, 2015 at Alcademics.com
I don't know the answer to this directly. My guess would be that it's just caramel coloring like in most scotch whisky, cognac, etc. to make it darker brown.
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Not sure - with high-proof alcohol I'd bet a very long time.
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So much new American and scotch whisky is being released that I can barely keep up with drinking it all. I do my best. Continue reading
Posted Jun 22, 2015 at Alcademics.com