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Molinari Sambuca is an anise liqueur originally created in Civitavecchia, a port city north of Rome. Much like Schiedam in the Netherlands where the spices that came on ships ended up in local spirits (juniper for genever and other ingredients for liqueurs in that case), star anise reaching Civitavecchia wound up in in local spirits and gave birth to the category of sambuca. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Alcademics.com
Yeah it's still a liqueur, so you have to substitute it for something sugary in a drink like a liqueur or simple syrup. Despite the sugar cane distillate base, it works really well with tequila and mezcal. So you have make a spicy margarita or Old Fashioned etc. I've had a ton of great drinks with it.
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Last fall I visited the growing, drying, and production facilities for Ancho Reyes chile liqueur near Puebla, Mexico. I learned a lot about chilies. Continue reading
Posted 3 days ago at Alcademics.com
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There is a new clear ice ball maker on the market, so I gave it a test run. Continue reading
Posted 4 days ago at Alcademics.com
Sounds like a good trick, thanks!
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May 2008: At a hotel near the Glenmorangie distillery in Scotland, a bag piper plays on the grounds. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted 5 days ago at Alcademics.com
Thanks. Well I don't believe they want any cask to go below 40% (as then it would no longer be cognac) but they can blend in higher-ABV cognacs before that point to balance it out. As things are always being blended and re-casked they have the opportunity to do that at any point. I would imagine (read: I don't know for sure) that if they think an eau de vie has particularly good chance for long aging they'd start it aging at a higher ABV and keep it in the cellars to minimize the angel's share throughout its life.
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As JC says below, a good illustration is here: http://www.alcademics.com/2013/05/perfectly-clear-ice-balls-a-clever-trick.html The only difference is that instead of a big pot of water, it's a small insulated mug around the ice ball.
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Yes - And just to add to this, one reader was having trouble as his freezer is very cold. So he had the ice ball nearly totally out of the water but it was freezing so fast that it froze the ice ball from the outside-in so fast and blocked the hole on the bottom of the mold. Perhaps in this case it would actually be preferable to have the ice ball mold lower into the water.
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Well I don't know for sure, but my guess is that it's the same as the Original Dry (label change? not sure) and the same as the international version. I do not think there is a difference between the international version and the Original Dry. Just guesses, but the yellowish color seems to lead us to this guess.
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HI - Every rule I've seen specifies that the bottles must be sealed/in original containers, which would mean no flasks.
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That would be fun to try for ice, if not the most practical method for home!
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I visited a bunch of cognac houses in the fall of 2014, and spent nearly a whole day with Cognac Hine at their vineyards, winery, distillery, and blending house. Continue reading
Posted Feb 25, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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In 2014 I visited several cognac houses, and had the pleasure to spend several hours with Benedicte Hardy of Cognac Hardy in their aging and blending facilities. We got really nerdy with specifics on aging cognac. But first, some background. Hardy specializes in luxury cognacs, and in general is blended in an "approachable" and "feminine" style. It's a very large operation, with 20,000 barrels aging at their warehouses valued at more than 50 million dollars worth of booze. It was Benedicte's father who made the company famous in recent years putting the emphasis on luxury. She herself has a law... Continue reading
Posted Feb 24, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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September 2008: Piles of pears to be made into eau de vie at St. George Spirits in Alameda, California. Read about it here. Continue reading
Posted Feb 22, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Thanks Amber - I literally just scheduled a post to go up about the new ice ball maker 5 minutes ago. I have only used the maker once and it worked fine but will look for the problems you experienced, then reschedule that post for later on after trying it a few more times. Thanks for the note!
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A quick tour of the house of Deau Cognac in France. Continue reading
Posted Feb 18, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Hi Mikkel - The Fernet Branca made in Argentina has a base spirit of sugar cane distillate. This fernet is sold in South and Latin America. http://www.alcademics.com/2013/06/a-visit-to-the-fernet-branca-distillery-in-buenos-aires-argentina.html Do you have a reference for where you heard that grapes are required? I have a copy of the EU laws and didn't see it there.
Toggle Commented Feb 17, 2015 on What is Fernet? at Alcademics.com
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The Merlet family has been distilling in France for 5 generations, but have only launched their own brand of cognac in recent years. They have a really interesting history that I learned on a visit to their chateau, vineyards, and distillery in 2014. Continue reading
Posted Feb 17, 2015 at Alcademics.com
While I am not positive, when I zoom way in on my pictures I think I see seeds.
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I believe that is true "before 1979 a Noilly Prat martini in the US would have been made with the "original dry" (yellow) formula." However this was all in the era of people not using very much vermouth at all (if we're talking post-Prohibition). Also I'm not sure the brand is making a claim that the recipe has been unaltered since its creation so if you're looking at specific historical points in time (as you tend to do) then we might have to ask about those time periods specifically.
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September 2010: This shot was taken at the Grupo Estevez bodega in the sherry region of Spain. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted Feb 15, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Thanks for the intel!
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For years I'd heard about the Islay Festival of Music and Malt aka Feis Ile, and last year I finally was able to attend courtesy of Bunnahabhain. (All pictures on this post of from Bunnahabhain's distillery day.) During Feis Ile, each of the distilleries on the island hosts a party one day, with live music, food, special tastings, demonstrations, and tours. Each distillery also puts out a special edition of whisky just for the festival and usually only available for purchase by attendees. During Bunnahabhain's distillery day, I had a chocolate and whisky tasting as well as a whisky and... Continue reading
Posted Feb 11, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Nice! I can imagine it would be dead quiet there at night- spoooky. I don't know if they still have that cabin, not that I've heard of but it might just not be open to the public.
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