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Camper English
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Potatoes originally come from Peru, but they're only the 18th largest producers of the crop. China and India, which are relatively new producers of potatoes, are the top growers. Then the US and Russia are nearly tied for third and fourth. Continue reading
Posted 6 hours ago at Alcademics.com
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April 2012: A field with rickhouses aging bourbon at the Heaven Hill distillery in Kentucky. Read more about my visit here. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Alcademics.com
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Super fun slow-motion videos of a new, cheap automatic cocktail shaker that stirs drinks for you. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Alcademics.com
It wouldn't come out as sugar crystals - just dehydrated fruit. It's fructose here, not sucrose, so the chemistry is probably different. I guess you'll have to search other places. Good luck!
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We have looked at what a potato is and the introduction of the potato to Europe. Now we'll look at the slow spread of potatoes around the continent, then talk about french fries, yum. Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Alcademics.com
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In today's history lesson, we'll look at how the potato came to Europe. Continue reading
Posted Sep 8, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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September 2009: The cellars at Cognac Tesseron. These are very old glass demijohn bottles, wrapped in something and covered in dust in basically a cave beneath the house. Read about the visit here. Continue reading
Posted Sep 7, 2014 at Alcademics.com
Linda - It looks like that letter is in line with their official policy as posted in the original post above. Leak-proof seems like overkill when combined with protective packaging requirements, but on the other hand you can't blame them for wanting to keep leaky luggage out of their planes. I did not know about TSA slitting the wine bags but that makes sense as they are suspicious of liquids in general. Yes it negates the airline requirement but at that point it's past the counter and into the TSA's hands I think. As a wine seller you'd be covered/beholden to: "Professional packaging by alcohol and wine suppliers (e.g., cruise lines, wineries, duty-free shops) is acceptable as long as the contents have adequate cushioning and the packaging prevents leakage." So you could put each bottle in a bag and then into the boxes; maybe even plastic wrap. (If clear then maybe the TSA is less likely to slit them?) It seems to me that this would be doing your best to be in full compliance, though ultimately it's up to the passenger not you to ensure that. I'm just a guy who brings booze on planes a lot; not an expert; but those are my thoughts.
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Thanks - That's where the page will be once they put something up.
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A story for Details.com of about 10 cocktail bars to get excited about opening around the country. Continue reading
Posted Sep 5, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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I bought a centrifuge and did a first set of experiments with tonic syrup. Continue reading
Posted Sep 4, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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Alcademics readers have come up with a method to make clear ice balls using plastic molds sitting atop an insulated container. Cheap and easy! Continue reading
Posted Sep 3, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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The potato is native to the Andes mountains in Peru, and was the most important crop of the Incas. There are about 5,000 potato varieties worldwide. Three thousand of them are found in the Andes alone, and all potatoes came from this single place of origin. Continue reading
Posted Sep 2, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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Rather than try to match the original gin exactly John took the existing botanicals (juniper, cholla cactus blossom, osha root, sage, and hops) and exercised some creative license to produce what he hopes truly matches the original vision of Wheeler’s: A gin that evokes the smell of the desert after a rain and seeks to highlight the unusual ingredients and their character. Continue reading
Posted Sep 1, 2014 at Alcademics.com
Here are the answers: 1. What was the bar near 3rd and Market where the 7-11 convenience store is today? The 711 Club 
 2. Which bar gave you Wet-Naps to accompany their unusual bar snacks? C. Bobby’s Owl Tree 
3. Which gay bar had a fence down the middle? The Detour
 4. What bar had a plastic deer frolicking in a winter scene as decoration? Sno-Drift 
5. Before Stompy was held there, which club had a pool and retractable roof? Oasis or V/SF 
6. Which place in the ghetto was known as *the* cocktail bar for bisexuals? Pow!
 7. Where did Mr. Mojito muddle? Enrico’s
 8. What club had the address 550? 550 Barneveld 
9. What was the legendary dance bar at the bottom of Haight Street? The Top
 10. What was the hotel bar named when it was named after a pool activity? Backflip
 11. The second bar was on Sixth Street. What was the name of the third one on Kearny? Gingers Trois
 12. What was the dance bar near Mission and Cesar Chavez? 26 Mix
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June 2012: Cuba's second most famous bar, La Bodeguita Del Medio. Continue reading
Posted Aug 31, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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Can you identify these 12 no-long-existing San Francisco watering holes? Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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Here are the new arrivals to Alcademics Global Headquarters this week. Continue reading
Posted Aug 29, 2014 at Alcademics.com
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Until last year there were only three Japanse whiskies on the US market, all of which are made by the company Suntory. In the years since, interest in these whiskies has increased and so has the number of them for sale stateside, available in a wide variety of prices and flavors. Now there are more than a dozen you can find if you look hard enough, ranging anywhere from $60 to $200 for standard bottlings and into the thousands for limited editions. Continue reading
Posted Aug 28, 2014 at Alcademics.com
It says the info will be on the website but I only see basic info. I'd check with their Facebook page. Good luck!
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Bubble caps go into the top of column stills to increase reflux and exposure to copper surfaces. This is a display at the Four Roses distillery of the inside of a bourbon column still. Read more about it here. Continue reading
Posted Aug 24, 2014 at Alcademics.com
At least on the front label there is no age statement on this one - I have the bottle at home and if there is one on the back I'll comment again but I kinda doubt it. There must be a movement going on - Bowmore Small Batch, Laphroaig Select, and this all coming out at the same time with no age statements...
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Dark Origins, a non-chill filtered single malt with an ABV of 46.8%,uses twice as many first fill sherry casks than in the classic Highland Park 12 year old resulting in a naturally darker, richer flavor. Continue reading
Posted Aug 21, 2014 at Alcademics.com
Hi - I had this same question from Kevin so I know the answer. The electrolyte solution is a concentrate. So first you make that. Then you add only 10g of that solution to the 1L of zero TDS water. I think it's confusing because we have a volume of of the electrolyte solution but then he specifies to use a weight of it. But he told me the reason is that it's easier to measure the electrolyte solution by weight at that small volume. Hopefully that answers your question!
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I'd love to try the hot wire foam cutter to see if it works for ice. I have tried with knives in boiling water but it hardly made a dent before it became too cold. Looking online they seem to go from cheap to really expensive pretty easily. Maybe I should try a cheap one for proof-of-concept...
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