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Camper English
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My visit to Domaine de Pellehaut armagnac was super quick, and so also is this post. Continue reading
Posted 3 hours ago at Alcademics.com
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Here are the new bottles of liquor hitting the market announced over the past few weeks. Continue reading
Posted yesterday at Alcademics.com
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The large wheel (tahona) at the Olmeca Altos distillery in Mexico is pulled by driver-free motor. They still need a guy to walk behind it and scrape up the crushed agave, so it's not all that high-tech. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted 2 days ago at Alcademics.com
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Maison Janneau armagnac is located near the town of Condom. It is the #1 exported brand of cognac. Continue reading
Posted 6 days ago at Alcademics.com
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A visit to the aging and blending facilities of the small armagnac brand Marquis de Montesquiou. Continue reading
Posted 7 days ago at Alcademics.com
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A look at the bars in Reykjavik, Iceland. Continue reading
Posted Mar 23, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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April 2012: Tabasco sauce ages in Louisiana for 3 years in ex-bourbon barrels: about 50,000 of them. Read more here. Continue reading
Posted Mar 22, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Single-grain whisky is trending so hard right now, but most people have no idea what it really is because it is *not* whisky made from a single grain. The "single" refers to a single distillery, and "grain" refers to, well, a bunch of other stuff. Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Making tonic water with purified quinine and extracts. Continue reading
Posted Mar 20, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Last week New York bar PDT's Jim Meehan launched an app called PDT Cocktails, containing 400 recipes. At the end of 2011, Jim Meehan published the beautiful PDT Cocktail Book, which contained 304 recipes. So I asked Meehan, "Is this just the book's recipes plus 100 additional recipes?" Continue reading
Posted Mar 19, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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If cognac is tequila, armagnac is mezcal: Smaller, wilder, and more rustic. In this post I'll cover some of the differences between these two French grape brandies. Continue reading
Posted Mar 18, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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Armagnac is a French grape brandy most similar to cognac, but ultimately very different in production and flavor profile. In this post I'll cover the basics of armagnac. Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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A report from the first annual Reykjavik Bar Summit. Continue reading
Posted Mar 16, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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November 2011: Oil Bar in Tokyo serves only two things: Jack Daniel's and Triangle Shochu. Read about my trip to Japan here. Continue reading
Posted Mar 15, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Yes it says to be permitted onboard the plane - kind of confusing language but it seems to mean it must be retail packaging whether that is checked or carry-on.
1 reply
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Here are some new spirits and liqueurs launching lately. Continue reading
Posted Mar 13, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Good question. I have not tried I believe that the alcohol will throw off the mix a bit as it's so liquid (it takes a lot of Campari to make that much Campari powder) and also alcohol is a solvent so it could push around the other ingredients. That said, I bet that if you just burn off the alcohol in Campari (heat it just to boiling and let it reduce by a lot) then you're left with a non-alcoholic Campari syrup, which might work in this recipe just fine.
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That's a really interesting way to do it! Thank you for posting it.
Toggle Commented Mar 12, 2015 on Balance in Cocktails at Alcademics.com
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Heh. I'm not sure a clip would work, as they fit into the insulated piece beneath them obscuring the lip. But maybe I was just sloppy with putting them together before, I'm having better results and I'm updating my numbers on the blog as I do. The ratio of success to failure seems to be getting better.
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I'm a bit behind in my New Booze posts about new spirits hitting the market, and boy howdy have there been a lot of them. Here are just the new whiskies. Continue reading
Posted Mar 12, 2015 at Alcademics.com
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A few of Zurich's best cocktail bars. Continue reading
Posted Mar 11, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Only in checked luggage. Carry-on bags are subject to the liquids rule just like shampoo, etc.
1 reply
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This limoncello is not like the others. A trip to the tiny island distillery where Limoncello Di Capri is made. Continue reading
Posted Mar 10, 2015 at Alcademics.com
Nice! Glad you got it figured out.
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Hi - Good questions. 1. Cognac and Armagnac producers do not like to add water all at once to the final brandy, as they believe this doesn't integrate well. They call it "breaking" the brandy when you do that. It is typical for producers to dilute with water very slowly, over a period of days, weeks, or even months for the very old stuff. Many producers also age a low-ABV water/brandy mixture "pete d'eau" in barrels alongside the brandy to use for dilution for similar reasons. 2. At each stage above the brandy from the barrels is put into a big vat, sometimes diluted, and then redistributed to barrels (probably different ones) in the new location. Part of the reason is so that the barrels stay full when refilled and do not dry out due to the angel's share. In the specific case of Hardy, I wasn't able to confirm that they go into larger and smaller barrels vs. staying in smaller barrels the same time. 3. Typically in Cognac/Armagnac the brandy is first aged for a short period of time (6 months or so) in a new (used for less than 3 years) barrel, then transferred to an older barrel (so that the wood tannins will not overtake the spirit flavor). For coganc that will be aged a super long time, they go into barrels that are "neutral", that don't really give much any flavor to the aging spirit. Hope that is helpful!
1 reply