This is Camper English's Typepad Profile.
Join Typepad and start following Camper English's activity
Join Now!
Already a member? Sign In
Camper English
Recent Activity
Interesting, thanks again!
Toggle Commented 3 days ago on Homemade Tonic Water Filtration at Alcademics.com
1 reply
Some pucks stay a little bit gloppy/wet and you can't smash them apart. Others are more like a hard candy. You can mostly smash them with a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, but the resulting stuff will stick back together right away. So you might be able to find interesting uses for it, but you won't really be able to use it like a dry sugar.
1 reply
My dehydrator only has 1 temperature setting. In the oven I put it on the lowest temperature.
1 reply
Do you think you get the same amount of tonic bitterness with this method? I continue to be unsure about if these methods extract quinine or just bark flavor *sigh*
Toggle Commented Apr 21, 2016 on Homemade Tonic Water Filtration at Alcademics.com
1 reply
Well, according to what I learned on my visit, Extra Dry should be clear - but all these reports on this and my other post have begun to make me question that. That said, if you've left it open for a little while it might turn light yellow after a bit.
1 reply
Image
I'll be giving two talks at the first Chicago Cocktail Summit on May 22 and 23, 2016. The summit is divided into two days: the first one for consumers and home enthusiasts, and the second for industry folk and bartenders. Continue reading
Posted Apr 21, 2016 at Alcademics.com
Image
For Departures.com I wrote a piece on new cocktail bars that have opened in the last 6 months. They named it "Best New Cocktail Bars" but I'd amend that to "Best New Cocktail Bars for the Readership of Departures," by which we mean fancy. Write-ups are for: Whitechapel, SF Americano, Portland Colombia Room, DC The Perennial, SF Himitsu, Atlanta Skyfall, Vegas The Sixth, Chicago Yvonne's, Boston Check 'em out. Related articles Winter's Weirdest Cocktail Flavor Trend Has Bartenders Going Bananas Continue reading
Posted Apr 19, 2016 at Alcademics.com
Image
I sat down for a video interview with Alan Kropf of Anchor Distilling. He denied me food and fed me lots of rum so that I'd spill all my secrets. Continue reading
Posted Apr 12, 2016 at Alcademics.com
Image
Directional Freezing is a simple method to make crystal clear ice by controlling the direction that water freezes. It was first explained here on Alcademics.com by Camper English in December 2009. The method has been written about in books, used in commercial products, and is employed in many small cocktail bars around the world. Continue reading
Posted Apr 11, 2016 at Alcademics.com
Image
In a recent post for Departures.com, I wrote about where to drink in a few US airports now, and a few announced plans for where you'll find better drinks in the future. Continue reading
Posted Apr 8, 2016 at Alcademics.com
My guess is that it's an extreme version of Ice Spikes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_spike With the interesting paragraph here: "Small ice spikes can be formed artificially on ice cubes produced in domestic refrigerators using distilled water in plastic ice cube trays. The formation of the spike is similar to that of the naturally occurring spike in that the expansion of interior water and the reduction of volume in the interior of the cube increase the pressure on the water pushing it upward through the hole. The growth of the tube ceases when the drop at the top of the tube freezes entirely, which is substantially before the rest of the water in the cube is frozen.[4] This method produces small spikes which are usually round or triangular in cross section with sharp tips. Experiments using this method have been carried out in laboratory settings but it has been found that spikes are less likely to form in ice cubes made from non-distilled water as impurities in the water inhibit spike formation.[nb 1][10] This poses the question of how naturally occurring ice spikes form in tapwater or rainwater and Libbrecht and Lui have suggested that, in the case of the small spikes grown in a refrigerator, impurities will become increasingly concentrated in the small unfrozen droplet at the top of the tube reducing the freezing rate and so the growth of the tube. However, they believe that on the rare occasions when exceptionally large spikes grow in natural, outdoor ice formations, some other mechanism must remove the impurities that build up at the top of the growing tube. Either impurities may be forced into pockets that freeze more slowly, or perhaps a convective flow, which would be insignificant in the smaller, artificially grown spikes, replaces the water at the top of the tube with fresh water from below.[3]" If CalTech hasn't figured it out yet, maybe we can :)
1 reply
Image
I have abandoned inferior ice picks in favor of these awesome new ones. Continue reading
Posted Apr 6, 2016 at Alcademics.com
http://www.alcademics.com/2012/03/packing-booze-airline-liquor-regulations.html
1 reply
Image
This year is the first (hopefully annual) Craft Bartender Summit, an online series of videos designed for (and free to) bartenders. There will be six videos, first streaming live on April 17th with the person in the video present in the chatroom alongside the showing. Then the videos will be available for viewing online for at least a couple of weeks. Continue reading
Posted Apr 5, 2016 at Alcademics.com
Thanks for the tip!
1 reply
Awesome, thanks for sharing your success.
1 reply
I do not know if by "traditional" stills in the EU regulation if they mean pot stills only, or if column/patent stills would qualify. So I guess I can't be helpful, sorry.
Toggle Commented Mar 29, 2016 on Gin Definitions at Alcademics.com
1 reply
While the cracking due to expansion is a sure thing, why do you say it's not trapped air also? The bottom of a cooler has very much lighter/airy-seeming ice in it. Just curious as to why you think it's not also air, as I've being going on that theory for a long time (in addition to cracking). And/or, can we think of a way to test that? I feel that when freezing in a conventional method from outside-in, the water remaining in the center sloshes around, showing increased air. I guess that would be a good way to test this; just to freeze something in a large enough non-insulated container to see if there is air in the inner bubble....
1 reply
Great idea - thanks!
1 reply
Image
A refinement of the method of making clear ice balls using a mold and a thermos. This method uses a beer koozie instead. Continue reading
Posted Mar 24, 2016 at Alcademics.com
I don't know the real/legal answer to this question, though I suspect as long as it meets the other requirements of packaging and such that it would be fine.
1 reply
I have answers! One person says when they put them back in the freezer he just leaves space between cubes at first, then moves them closer together after they've been in there a bit. A second person says he does "Nothing special, just a little tap tap tappy with the ice pick to separate." Two other people say to spray a little vodka on the cubes before storing them in the freezer and they'll not stick together. Which sounds like a cool experiment to try!
Toggle Commented Mar 17, 2016 on Ice Meets Chainsaw at Alcademics.com
1 reply
Image
The Craft Spirits Data Project, which was announced at ACSA’S 2016 Distillers Convention and Vendor Trade Show in Chicago earlier this month, is the beverage industry’s first-ever comprehensive craft distilling study. The Project will quantify the number, size, and impact of craft spirits producers in the United States. Continue reading
Posted Mar 17, 2016 at Alcademics.com
It should not 'spoil' or turn to vinegar like wine. If the seal was not good, alcohol may have evaporated, as well as some aromatics. I don't work for the company, but I don't think you're in any danger of having a bad product, just perhaps one that doesn't taste as bright as it used to.
1 reply
Image
A round-up of new bar tools and a few mixers hitting the market. Continue reading
Posted Mar 15, 2016 at Alcademics.com