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chandracerchionepeltier
Nashville, Tennessee
Figurative artist and freelance writer.
Interests: artdolls, Edward Gorey, stop-motion animation, the Symbolists, the Decadent Movement, The Pre-Raphaelites, Oscar Wilde, Victorian Fairy Artists such as John Anster Fitzgerald and Richard Dadd, Cirque du Soleil, antique glitter glass, Surrealist Movement, commedie dell'arte, vintage clothing, literature, reading, William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement, mythic fiction, Endicott Studio, mermaids and sirens, kindness and compassion, drawing, underground comics, Dadaism, environmental issues...
Recent Activity
Wishing Tilly and you a speedy recovery, lovely to see you all enjoying the sunshine! 💕☀️💕
Toggle Commented Sep 22, 2015 on Myth & Moor update at Myth & Moor
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Thanks so much, Terri, but it is actually very good news! Yes, we were all extremely worried about her, but the operation went well and she is already at home. On top of that, Mom reports that she believes her back to be stronger. Mom teaches sewing and fiber arts classes, and we are very hopeful that she will return to teaching with increased strength and energy, as well as a welcomed relief from years of pain. Wishing health and happiness to us all!
Toggle Commented Aug 20, 2015 on In the Word Wood at Myth & Moor
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So happy Tiilly is doing better! We have had our own health scare here, as my mom had an operation to remove part of one of her discs that was pressing on a nerve. She had suffered for more than 30 years because of this slipped disc, but the pain recently has become unbearable. I hope that in the year to come we are all pain free, enjoying the fullness of health!
Toggle Commented Aug 19, 2015 on In the Word Wood at Myth & Moor
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I love the Blue Ridge Mountains as well (as you can probably tell), a magical place. A marvelous ecosystem teeming with life!
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on The enclosure of childhood at Myth & Moor
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Thank you, Terri, it really was!
Toggle Commented Jun 15, 2015 on The enclosure of childhood at Myth & Moor
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Also, I remember building an elf village in one of the rhododendron tunnels, complete with a stone paved common area and fencing made of little twigs, making up stories as I created my tiny world! :)
Toggle Commented Jun 12, 2015 on The enclosure of childhood at Myth & Moor
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Thanks, Dona, I really do feel truly blessed, and try to get outside with my daughter as much as possible now.
Toggle Commented Jun 12, 2015 on The enclosure of childhood at Myth & Moor
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When I was twelve two things happened: I moved from just outside of DC to the wild mountains of North Carolina, and I received a copy of Froud/Lee's Faeries. I had enjoyed plenty of outdoor spaces in Reston. In walking distance from my townhouse I could find three playgrounds, two tennis courts, a volleyball court, two ponds, a lake, and three pools. There were groomed lawns and wooded walkways, and often neighborhood kids would get together to play kick the can or skateboard together. But outside life in the mountains of North Carolina was an altogether different experience. We moved in 1977 after my parents purchased 65 acres. The property was wild when we arrived, filled with lush raspberry and blackberry bushes, towering trees hundreds of years old, buffalo trails, and rhododendron so ancient that they had formed tunnels to explore. There were streams and creek beds lined with enormous limestone rocks, and filled with minnows, tadpoles, and waterbugs. One could hear a daily tattoo from pileated woodpeckers, and the nightly hoot of the owl. Sometimes I would sneak out in the middle of the night, and climb an enormous pine tree in order to listen to night noises and the wind. There were few neighbors and fewer kids, so I had to rely on my own imagination to keep me company. This was greatly aided by the Faeries book, a book as equally informed by the landscape as it was by faeries. Now the land I explored seemed inhabited by magical beings everywhere I looked! In the rhododendron tunnels, hiding under the limestone rocks, in the slanting light among the ancient trees, in the tap of a pileated woodpecker, from the call of an owl. Much of my creative life today was formed by those years rambling and exploring the North Carolina mountains. I cannot imagine how much poorer I would have been without my relationship to nature.
Toggle Commented Jun 12, 2015 on The enclosure of childhood at Myth & Moor
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Fantastic, excited to follow their adventures!
Toggle Commented Oct 14, 2014 on Roll up! Roll up! at Myth & Moor
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Oh, thank you, Phyllis! Well, obviously I love dolls, too! ^_______^ And yes, I also spent countless hours as a child imagining stories for my dolls to stage. Thank you for your kind words!
Toggle Commented May 8, 2013 on Spring arrives in Chagford at Myth & Moor
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Wonderful post and Jane's poem gave me chills! For some reason your post made me think of the chapter "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from The Wind in the Willows. Welcome back, Terri! xoxo
Toggle Commented May 7, 2013 on Spring arrives in Chagford at Myth & Moor
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Love the poem, Ms. Yolen, describes my dear, departed dad to a T. (and while some might have been, we never felt embarrassed when he talked to the waitresses)! ^________^
Toggle Commented Oct 25, 2012 on T.H. White: a rescued mind at Myth & Moor
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White was one of my most dearly loved authors as a child, not only for The Once and Future King and The Book of Merlin, but also because of Mistress Masham's Repose. If he ever made a study of wildlife, he most certainly made a study of children and understood them more deeply than most authors because he addressed them and treated them as equals. That a child should transform into fish or fowl must have seemed the most natural thing in the world to White, and his gift to allow us to see things through the eyes of a wild creature gave his readers a particular sensitivity to the natural world. Thank you for posting this, and the wonderful image from Alan Lee.
Toggle Commented Oct 25, 2012 on T.H. White: a rescued mind at Myth & Moor
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Beautiful quotes and photos, and I especially loved the poem by Jane Yolen. It reminded of what Hildegard of Bingen called viriditas, or greening power, which means fecundity and growth not only in nature but also in creativity. Have a great week, Terri! ^_____^
Toggle Commented Aug 24, 2012 on Holding on to what's good at Myth & Moor
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Thanks for the link, Terri. While I have a lot of respect for Gore Vidal and am sorry that he died, like Theodora, I disagree with his lack of belief beyond the material world. Her comments about being on a path really resonated with me as well. As they say, Touch Magic... ^_____^
Toggle Commented Aug 15, 2012 on Recommended Reading at Myth & Moor
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Wonderful comments from everyone! Terri, I love your thought provoking posts. Janette, I want to be a rabbit child, too! ^______^
Toggle Commented Aug 14, 2012 on Animalness at Myth & Moor
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Kahlil Gibran wrote: “Trees are poems the earth writes upon the sky, We fell them down and turn them into paper, That we may record our emptiness.” While I agree with the first part, I do not necessarily agree with the latter. I prefer what Wilde had to say about Art: "Art finds her own perfection within, and not outside of, herself. She is not to be judged by any external standard of resemblance. She is a veil, rather than a mirror. She has flowers that no forests know of, birds that no woodland possesses. She makes and unmakes many worlds, and can draw the moon from heaven with a scarlet thread. Hers are the "forms more real than living man," and hers the great archetypes of which things that have existence are but unfinished copies. Nature has, in her eyes, no laws, no uniformity. She can work miracles at her will, and when she calls monsters from the deep they come. She can bid the almond tree blossom in winter, and send the snow upon the ripe cornfield. At her word the frost lays its silver finger on the burning mouth of June, and the winged lions creep out from the hollows of the Lydian hills. The dryads peer from the thicket as she passes by, and the brown fauns smile strangely at her when she comes near them. She has hawkfaced gods that worship her, and the centaurs gallop at her side."
Toggle Commented Aug 12, 2012 on Time and memory at Myth & Moor
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Lovely!! I join with you all in spirit! xoxo
Toggle Commented Mar 23, 2011 on Celebrating the Sun at Myth & Moor
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Thank you both so much, Francine and Alice!
Toggle Commented Dec 18, 2010 on The Mice of Squeaky Hollow at Chandra's Box of Stars
Hi Carolee! I am thrilled to have joined EHAG!! ^_^ I became a member of Southern Highlands in 2003, but my mother joined as a fiber artist all the way back in 1977! I haven't done one of their craft shows yet, but I have sold work through their Guild shops for a few years now.
Thank you, Rehana! I'm so glad that you like my work, and it is very gratifying to hear such positive feedback. Please stop by often!